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Romans 15:4 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that through patience and through comfort of the scriptures we might have hope.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— For whatever was written in earlier times was written for our instruction, so that through perseverance and the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— For whatever things were written formerly, were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— For as many things as have been written before have been written for our instruction, that through endurance and through encouragement of the scriptures we might have hope.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Whatsoever things, in fact, were written aforetime, [all] for our own instruction were written,—in order that, through endurance and through the encouragement of the Scriptures, we might have their hope.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— for, as many things as were written before, for our instruction were written before, that through the endurance, and the exhortation of the Writings, we might have the hope.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— For what things soever were written were written for our learning: that, through patience and the comfort of the scriptures, we might have hope.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— For whatsoeuer things were written aforetime, were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the Scriptures might haue hope.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— For every thing that hath before been written for our instruction was written, that by the patience and consolation of the scriptures we might have hope.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— For every thing written of old, was written for our instruction; that we, by patience and by the consolation of the scriptures, might possess hope.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
For 1063
{1063} Prime
γάρ
gar
{gar}
A primary particle; properly assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles).
whatsoever things 3745
{3745} Prime
ὅσος
hosos
{hos'-os}
By reduplication from G3739; as (much, great, long, etc.) as.
were written aforetime 4270
{4270} Prime
προγράφω
prographo
{prog-raf'-o}
From G4253 and G1125; to write previously; figuratively to announce, prescribe.
z5648
<5648> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 72
were written 4270
{4270} Prime
προγράφω
prographo
{prog-raf'-o}
From G4253 and G1125; to write previously; figuratively to announce, prescribe.
z5648
<5648> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 72
for 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
our 2251
{2251} Prime
ἡμέτερος
hemeteros
{hay-met'-er-os}
From G2349; our. (Or your by a different reading.).
learning, 1319
{1319} Prime
διδασκαλία
didaskalia
{did-as-kal-ee'-ah}
From G1320; instruction (the function or the information).
that 2443
{2443} Prime
ἵνα
hina
{hin'-ah}
Probably from the same as the former part of G1438 (through the demonstrative idea; compare G3588); in order that (denoting the purpose or the result).
we y2192
[2192] Standard
ἔχω
echo
{ekh'-o}
A primary verb (including an alternate form σχέω [[scheo]], {skheh'-o}; used in certain tenses only); to hold (used in very various applications, literally or figuratively, direct or remote; such as possession, ability, contiguity, relation or condition).
z0
<0000> Grammar
The original word in the Greek or Hebrew is translated by more than one word in the English. The English translation is separated by one or more other words from the original.
through 1223
{1223} Prime
διά
dia
{dee-ah'}
A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through (in very wide applications, local, causal or occasional). In composition it retains the same general import.
patience 5281
{5281} Prime
ὑπομονή
hupomone
{hoop-om-on-ay'}
From G5278; cheerful (or hopeful) endurance, constancy.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
comfort 3874
{3874} Prime
παράκλησις
paraklesis
{par-ak'-lay-sis}
From G3870; imploration, hortation, solace.
of the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
scriptures 1124
{1124} Prime
γραφή
graphe
{graf-ay'}
From G1125; a document, that is, holy Writ (or its contents or a statement in it).
might have 2192
{2192} Prime
ἔχω
echo
{ekh'-o}
A primary verb (including an alternate form σχέω [[scheo]], {skheh'-o}; used in certain tenses only); to hold (used in very various applications, literally or figuratively, direct or remote; such as possession, ability, contiguity, relation or condition).
z5725
<5725> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 352
hope. 1680
{1680} Prime
ἐλπίς
elpis
{el-pece'}
From ἔλπω [[elpo]] which is a primary word (to anticipate, usually with pleasure); expectation (abstract or concrete) or confidence.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Romans 15:4

_ _ For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning — “instruction”

_ _ through, etc. — “through the comfort and the patience of the Scriptures”

_ _ might have hope — that is, “Think not that because such portions of Scripture relate immediately to Christ, they are inapplicable to you; for though Christ’s sufferings, as a Savior, were exclusively His own, the motives that prompted them, the spirit in which they were endured, and the general principle involved in His whole work — self-sacrifice for the good of others — furnish our most perfect and beautiful model; and so all Scripture relating to these is for our instruction; and since the duty of forbearance, the strong with the weak, requires ‘patience,’ and this again needs ‘comfort,’ all those Scriptures which tell of patience and consolation, particularly of the patience of Christ, and of the consolation which sustained Him under it, are our appointed and appropriate nutriment, ministering to us ‘hope’ of that blessed day when these shall no more be needed.” See on Romans 4:25, Note 7. (For the same connection between “patience and hope” see on Romans 12:12, and see on 1 Thessalonians 1:3).

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Romans 15:1-4.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Romans 15:4

Aforetime — In the Old Testament. That we through patience and consolation of the scriptures may have hope — That through the consolation which God gives us by these, we may have patience and a joyful hope.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Romans 15:4

(3) For whatsoever things were written (c) aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the (d) scriptures might have hope.

(3) The preventing of an objection: such things as are cited out of the examples of the ancients, are propounded unto us to this end and purpose, that according to the example of our fathers we should in patience and hope bear one with another.

(c) By Moses and the prophets.

(d) The scriptures are said to teach and comfort, because God uses them to teach and comfort his people with them.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
whatsoever:

Romans 4:23-24 Now it was not written for his sake alone, that it was imputed to him; ... But for us also, to whom it shall be imputed, if we believe on him that raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead;
1 Corinthians 9:9-10 For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn. Doth God take care for oxen? ... Or saith he [it] altogether for our sakes? For our sakes, no doubt, [this] is written: that he that ploweth should plow in hope; and that he that thresheth in hope should be partaker of his hope.
1 Corinthians 10:11 Now all these things happened unto them for ensamples: and they are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come.
2 Timothy 3:16-17 All scripture [is] given by inspiration of God, and [is] profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: ... That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.
2 Peter 1:20-21 Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. ... For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake [as they were] moved by the Holy Ghost.

for our learning:
Rather, "for our instruction."

that:

Romans 5:3-5 And not only [so], but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience; ... And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.
Romans 8:24-25 For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for? ... But if we hope for that we see not, [then] do we with patience wait for [it].
Romans 12:12 Rejoicing in hope; patient in tribulation; continuing instant in prayer;
Psalms 119:81-83 CAPH. My soul fainteth for thy salvation: [but] I hope in thy word. ... For I am become like a bottle in the smoke; [yet] do I not forget thy statutes.
Hebrews 6:10-19 For God [is] not unrighteous to forget your work and labour of love, which ye have shewed toward his name, in that ye have ministered to the saints, and do minister. ... Which [hope] we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil;
Hebrews 10:35-36 Cast not away therefore your confidence, which hath great recompence of reward. ... For ye have need of patience, that, after ye have done the will of God, ye might receive the promise.
James 5:7-11 Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain. ... Behold, we count them happy which endure. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy.
1 Peter 1:13 Wherefore gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and hope to the end for the grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ;
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Chain-Reference Bible Search

Ps 119:81. Ro 4:23; 5:3; 8:24; 12:12. 1Co 9:9; 10:11. 2Ti 3:16. He 6:10; 10:35. Jm 5:7. 1P 1:13. 2P 1:20.

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