Parallel Bible VersionsGreek Bible Study Tools

Romans 15:14 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And I myself also am persuaded of you, my brethren, that ye yourselves are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And I myself also am persuaded of you, my brethren, that ye also are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— And concerning you, my brethren, I myself also am convinced that you yourselves are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge and able also to admonish one another.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And I myself also am persuaded concerning you, my brethren, that ye also are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— But I am persuaded, my brethren, I myself also, concerning you, that yourselves also are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— But I am persuaded my brethren,—even, I myself, concerning you: that, ye yourselves, also are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also, unto one another, to be ministering admonition:
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And I am persuaded, my brethren—I myself also—concerning you, that ye yourselves also are full of goodness, having been filled with all knowledge, able also one another to admonish;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And I myself also, my brethren, am assured of you that you also are full of love, replenished with all knowledge, so that you are able to admonish one another.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And I my selfe also am perswaded of you, my brethren, that ye also are full of goodnesse, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— BUT I am persuaded also concerning you, my brethren, that you are also full of good, and filled with all knowledge, and able also to instruct others.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— Now I am persuaded, my Brethren, even I, concerning you; that ye too are full of goodness, and are replenished with all knowledge, and are able also to instruct others.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
I 1473
{1473} Prime
ἐγώ
ego
{eg-o'}
A primary pronoun of the first person, 'I' (only expressed when emphatic).
myself y846
[0846] Standard
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
x848
(0848) Complement
αὑτοῦ
hautou
{how-too'}
Contraction for G1438; self (in some oblique case or reflexive relation).
also 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
am persuaded 3982
{3982} Prime
πείθω
peitho
{pi'-tho}
A primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty).
z5769
<5769> Grammar
Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 215
of 4012
{4012} Prime
περί
peri
{per-ee'}
From the base of G4008; properly through (all over), that is, around; figuratively with respect to; used in various applications, of place, cause or time (with the genitive case denoting the subject or occasion or superlative point; with the accusative case the locality, circuit, matter, circumstance or general period).
you, 5216
{5216} Prime
ὑμῶν
humon
{hoo-mone'}
Genitive case of G5210; of (from or concerning) you.
my 3450
{3450} Prime
μοῦ
mou
{moo}
The simpler from of G1700; of me.
brethren, 80
{0080} Prime
ἀδελφός
adelphos
{ad-el-fos'}
From G0001 (as a connective particle) and δελφύς [[delphus]] (the womb); a brother (literally or figuratively) near or remote (much like [H0001]).
that 3754
{3754} Prime
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
ye y846
[0846] Standard
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
x848
(0848) Complement
αὑτοῦ
hautou
{how-too'}
Contraction for G1438; self (in some oblique case or reflexive relation).
also 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
are 2075
{2075} Prime
ἐστέ
este
{es-teh'}
Second person plural present indicative of G1510; ye are.
z5748
<5748> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 1612
full 3324
{3324} Prime
μεστός
mestos
{mes-tos'}
Of uncertain derivative; replete (literally or figuratively).
of goodness, 19
{0019} Prime
ἀγαθωσύνη
agathosune
{ag-ath-o-soo'-nay}
From G0018; goodness, that is, virtue or beneficence.
filled 4137
{4137} Prime
πληρόω
pleroo
{play-ro'-o}
From G4134; to make replete, that is, (literally) to cram (a net), level up (a hollow), or (figuratively) to furnish (or imbue, diffuse, influence), satisfy, execute (an office), finish (a period or task), verify (or coincide with a prediction), etc.
z5772
<5772> Grammar
Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 463
with all 3956
{3956} Prime
πᾶς
pas
{pas}
Including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole.
knowledge, 1108
{1108} Prime
γνῶσις
gnosis
{gno'-sis}
From G1097; knowing (the act), that is, (by implication) knowledge.
able 1410
{1410} Prime
δύναμαι
dunamai
{doo'-nam-ahee}
Of uncertain affinity; to be able or possible.
z5740
<5740> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 544
also 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
to admonish 3560
{3560} Prime
νουθετέω
noutheteo
{noo-thet-eh'-o}
From the same as G3559; to put in mind, that is, (by implication) to caution or reprove gently.
z5721
<5721> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 647
one another. 240
{0240} Prime
ἀλλήλων
allelon
{al-lay'-lone}
Genitive plural from G0243 reduplicated; one another. (Sometimes with G3326 or G4314.).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Romans 15:14-15

_ _ Romans 15:14-33. Conclusion: in which the apostle apologizes for thus writing to the Roman Christians, explains why he had not yet visited them, announces his future plans, and asks their prayers for the completion of them.

_ _ And, etc. — rather, “Now I am persuaded, my brethren, even I myself, concerning you”

_ _ that ye also yourselves are full of goodness — of inclination to all I have been enjoining on you

_ _ filled with all knowledge — of the truth expounded

_ _ and able — without my intervention.

_ _ to admonish one another.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Romans 15:14-16

_ _ Here, I. He commends these Christians with the highest characters that could be. He began his epistle with their praises (Romans 1:8), Your faith is spoken of throughout the world, thereby to make way for his discourse: and, because sometimes he had reproved them sharply, he now concludes with the like commendation, to qualify them, and to part friends. This he does like an orator. It was not a piece of idle flattery and compliment, but a due acknowledgment of their worth, and of the grace of God in them. We must be forward to observe and commend in others that which is excellent and praise-worthy; it is part of the present recompence of virtue and usefulness, and will be of use to quicken others to a holy emulation. It was a great credit to the Romans to be commended by Paul, a man of such great judgment and integrity, too skilful to be deceived and too honest to flatter. Paul had no personal acquaintance with these Christians, and yet he says he was persuaded of their excellencies, though he knew them only be hearsay. As we must not, on the one hand, be so simple as to believe every word; so, on the other hand, we must not be so skeptical as to believe nothing; but especially we must be forward to believe good concerning others: in this case charity hopeth all things, and believeth all things, and (if the probabilities be any way strong, as here they were) is persuaded. It is safer to err on this side. Now observe what it was that he commended them for. 1. That they were full of goodness; therefore the more likely to take in good part what he had written, and to account it a kindness; and not only so, but to comply with it, and to put it in practice, especially that which relates to their union and to the healing of their differences. A good understanding of one another, and a good will to one another, would soon put an end to strife. 2. Filled with all knowledge. Goodness and knowledge together! A very rare and an excellent conjunction; the head and the heart of the new man. All knowledge, all necessary knowledge, all the knowledge of those things which belong to their everlasting peace. 3. Able to admonish one another. To this there is a further gift requisite, even the gift of utterance. Those that have goodness and knowledge should communicate what they have for the use and benefit of others. “You that excel so much in good gifts may think you have no need of any instructions of mine.” It is a comfort to faithful ministers to see their work superseded by the gifts and graces of their people. How gladly would ministers leave off their admonishing work, if people were able and willing to admonish one another! Would to God that all the Lord's people were prophets. But that which is every body's work is nobody's work; and therefore,

_ _ II. He clears himself from the suspicion of intermeddling needlessly with that which did not belong to him, Romans 15:15. Observe how affectionately he speaks to them: My brethren (Romans 15:14), and again, brethren, Romans 15:15. He had himself, and taught others, the art of obliging. He calls them all his brethren, to teach them brotherly love one to another. Probably he wrote the more courteously to them because, being Roman citizens living near the court, they were more genteel, and made a better figure; and therefore Paul, who became all things to all men, was willing, by the respectfulness of his style, to please them for their good. He acknowledges he had written boldly in some sorttolmroteron apo merous, in a manner that looked like boldness and presumption, and for which some might perhaps charge him with taking too much upon him. But then consider,

_ _ 1. He did it only as their remembrancer: As putting you in mind. such humble thoughts had Paul of himself, though he excelled in knowledge, that he would not pretend to tell them that which they did not know before, but only to remind them of that in which they had formerly been by others instructed. So Peter, 2 Peter 1:12; 2 Peter 3:1. People commonly excuse themselves from hearing the word with this, that the minister can tell them nothing but what they knew before. If it be so, yet have they not need to know it better, and to be put in mind of it?

_ _ 2. He did it as the apostle of the Gentiles. It was in pursuance of his office: Because of the grace (that is, the apostleship, Romans 1:5) given to me of God, to be the minister of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles, Romans 15:16. Paul reckoned it a great favour, and an honour that God had put upon him, in putting him into that office, Romans 1:13. Now, because of this grace given to him, he thus laid out himself among the Gentiles, that he might not receive that grace of God in vain. Christ received that he might give; so did Paul; so have we talents which must not be buried. Places and offices must be filled up with duty. It is good for ministers to be often remembering the grace that is given unto them of God. Minister verbi es, hoc age — You are a minister of the word; give yourself wholly to it, was Mr. Perkins's motto. Paul was a minister. Observe here, (1.) Whose minister he was: the minister of Jesus Christ, 1 Corinthians 4:1. He is our Master; his we are, and him we serve. (2.) To whom: to the Gentiles. So God had appointed him, Acts 22:21. So Peter and he had agreed, Galatians 2:7-9. These Romans were Gentiles: “Now,” says he, “I do not thrust myself upon you, nor seek any lordship over you; I am appointed to it: if you think I am rude and bold, my commission is my warrant, and must bear me out.” (3.) What he ministered: the gospel of God; hierourgounta to euangelionministering as about holy things (so the word signifies), executing the office of a Christian priest, more spiritual, and therefore more excellent, than the Levitical priesthood. (4.) For what end: that the offering up (or sacrificing) of the Gentiles might be acceptable — that god might have the glory which would redound to his name by the conversion of the Gentiles. Paul laid out himself thus to bring about something that might be acceptable to God. Observe how the conversion of the Gentiles is expressed: it is the offering up of the Gentiles; it is prosphora tn ethnnthe oblation of the Gentiles, in which the Gentiles are looked upon either, [1.] As the priests, offering the oblation of prayer and praise and other acts of religion. Long had the Jews been the holy nation, the kingdom of priests, but now the Gentiles are made priests unto God (Revelation 5:10), by their conversion to the Christian faith consecrated to the service of God, that the scripture may be fulfilled, In ever place incense shall be offered, and a pure offering, Malachi 1:11. The converted Gentiles are said to be made nigh (Ephesians 2:13) — the periphrasis of priests. Or, [2.] The Gentiles are themselves the sacrifice offered up to God by Paul, in the name of Christ, a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, Romans 12:1. A sanctified soul is offered up to God in the flames of love, upon Christ the altar. Paul gathered in souls by his preaching, not to keep them to himself, but to offer them up to God: Behold, I, and the children that God hath given me. And it is an acceptable offering, being sanctified by the Holy Ghost. Paul preached to them, and dealt with them; but that which made them sacrifices to God was their sanctification; and this was not his work, but the work of the Holy Ghost. None are acceptably offered to God but those that are sanctified: unholy things can never be pleasing to the holy God.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Romans 15:14

There are several conclusions of this Epistle.

The first begins at this verse;

the second, Romans 16:1;

the third, Romans 16:17;

the fourth, Romans 16:21;

and the fifth, Romans 16:25;

Ye are full of goodness — By being created anew. And filled with all knowledge — By long experience of the things of God. To admonish — To instruct and confirm.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Romans 15:14

(8) And I myself also am persuaded of you, my brethren, that (l) ye also are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another.

(8) The conclusion of the epistle, in which he first excuses himself, that he has written somewhat at length to them, rather to warn them than to teach them, and that of necessity, by reason of his calling, which binds him in a special way to the Gentiles.

(l) Of your own accord, and by yourselves.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
I:

Philippians 1:7 Even as it is meet for me to think this of you all, because I have you in my heart; inasmuch as both in my bonds, and in the defence and confirmation of the gospel, ye all are partakers of my grace.
2 Timothy 1:5 When I call to remembrance the unfeigned faith that is in thee, which dwelt first in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice; and I am persuaded that in thee also.
Philemon 1:21 Having confidence in thy obedience I wrote unto thee, knowing that thou wilt also do more than I say.
Hebrews 6:9 But, beloved, we are persuaded better things of you, and things that accompany salvation, though we thus speak.
2 Peter 1:12 Wherefore I will not be negligent to put you always in remembrance of these things, though ye know [them], and be established in the present truth.
1 John 2:21 I have not written unto you because ye know not the truth, but because ye know it, and that no lie is of the truth.

full:

Philippians 1:11 Being filled with the fruits of righteousness, which are by Jesus Christ, unto the glory and praise of God.
Colossians 1:8-10 Who also declared unto us your love in the Spirit. ... That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God;
2 Peter 1:5-8 And beside this, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge; ... For if these things be in you, and abound, they make [you that ye shall] neither [be] barren nor unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.

filled:

1 Corinthians 8:1 Now as touching things offered unto idols, we know that we all have knowledge. Knowledge puffeth up, but charity edifieth.
1 Corinthians 8:7 Howbeit [there is] not in every man that knowledge: for some with conscience of the idol unto this hour eat [it] as a thing offered unto an idol; and their conscience being weak is defiled.
1 Corinthians 8:10 For if any man see thee which hast knowledge sit at meat in the idol's temple, shall not the conscience of him which is weak be emboldened to eat those things which are offered to idols;

able:

Colossians 3:16 Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.
1 Thessalonians 5:11 Wherefore comfort yourselves together, and edify one another, even as also ye do.
1 Thessalonians 5:14 Now we exhort you, brethren, warn them that are unruly, comfort the feebleminded, support the weak, be patient toward all [men].
Titus 2:3-4 The aged women likewise, that [they be] in behaviour as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things; ... That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,
Hebrews 5:12 For when for the time ye ought to be teachers, ye have need that one teach you again which [be] the first principles of the oracles of God; and are become such as have need of milk, and not of strong meat.
Hebrews 10:24-25 And let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works: ... Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some [is]; but exhorting [one another]: and so much the more, as ye see the day approaching.
Jude 1:20-23 But ye, beloved, building up yourselves on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Ghost, ... And others save with fear, pulling [them] out of the fire; hating even the garment spotted by the flesh.
Random Bible VersesNew Quotes



Chain-Reference Bible Search

1Co 8:1, 7, 10. Php 1:7, 11. Col 1:8; 3:16. 1Th 5:11, 14. 2Ti 1:5. Tit 2:3. Phm 1:21. He 5:12; 6:9; 10:24. 2P 1:5, 12. 1Jn 2:21. Jde 1:20.

Newest Chat Bible Comment
Comment HereComplete Biblical ResearchComplete Chat Bible Commentary
Please post your comment on Romans 15:14.
Name:

WWW Chat Bible Commentary

User-Posted Comments on Romans 15:14


Recent Chat Bible Comments