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Romans 1:32 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— who, knowing the ordinance of God, that they that practise such things are worthy of death, not only do the same, but also consent with them that practise them.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Who knowing the judgment of God, that they which commit such things are worthy of death, not only do the same, but have pleasure in them that do them.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— and although they know the ordinance of God, that those who practice such things are worthy of death, they not only do the same, but also give hearty approval to those who practice them.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Who, knowing the judgment of God, that they who commit such things are worthy of death; not only do the same, but have pleasure in them that do them.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— who knowing the righteous judgment of God, that they who do such things are worthy of death, not only practise them, but have fellow delight in those who do [them].
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Who, indeed, having acknowledged the righteous sentence of God,—that, they who such things as these do practise, are worthy of death, not only, the same things, are doing, but are even delighting together with them who are practising [them].
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— who the righteous judgment of God having known—that those practising such things are worthy of death—not only do them, but also have delight with those practising them.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Who, having known the justice of God, did not understand that they who do such things, are worthy of death: and not only they that do them, but they also that consent to them that do them.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Who knowing the iudgement of God, (that they which commit such things, are worthy of death) not onely do the same, but haue pleasure in them that doe them.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— who, knowing the judgment of Aloha, that they who these things do, unto death are condemned, (yet) not only do them, but also participate with those who do them.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— These, while they know the judgment of God, that he condemneth those to death who perpetrate such things, are not only doers of them, but the companions of such as do them.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Who 3748
{3748} Prime
ὅστις
hostis
{hos'-tis}
From G3739 and G5100; which some, that is, any that; also (definitely) which same.
knowing 1921
{1921} Prime
ἐπιγινώσκω
epiginosko
{ep-ig-in-oce'-ko}
From G1909 and G1097; to know upon some mark, that is, recognise; by implication to become fully acquainted with, to acknowledge.
z5631
<5631> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 889
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
judgment 1345
{1345} Prime
δικαίωμα
dikaioma
{dik-ah'-yo-mah}
From G1344; an equitable deed; by implication a statute or decision.
of God, 2316
{2316} Prime
θεός
theos
{theh'-os}
Of uncertain affinity; a deity, especially (with G3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively a magistrate; by Hebraism very.
that 3754
{3754} Prime
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
they which commit 4238
{4238} Prime
πράσσω
prasso
{pras'-so}
A primary verb; to 'practise', that is, perform repeatedly or habitually (thus differing from G4160, which properly refers to a single act); by implication to execute, accomplish, etc.; specifically to collect (dues), fare (personally).
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
such things 5108
{5108} Prime
τοιοῦτος
toioutos
{toy-oo'-tos}
(Including the other inflections); from G5104 and G3778; truly this, that is, of this sort (to denote character or individuality).
are 1526
{1526} Prime
εἰσί
eisi
{i-see'}
Third person plural present indicative of G1510; they are.
z5748
<5748> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 1612
worthy 514
{0514} Prime
ἄξιος
axios
{ax'-ee-os}
Probably from G0071; deserving, comparable or suitable (as if drawing praise).
of death, 2288
{2288} Prime
θάνατος
thanatos
{than'-at-os}
From G2348; (properly an adjective used as a noun) death (literally or figuratively).
not 3756
{3756} Prime
οὐ
ou
{oo}
A primary word; the absolutely negative (compare G3361) adverb; no or not.
only 3440
{3440} Prime
μόνον
monon
{mon'-on}
Neuter of G3441 as adverb; merely.
do 4160
{4160} Prime
ποιέω
poieo
{poy-eh'-o}
Apparently a prolonged form of an obsolete primary; to make or do (in a very wide application, more or less direct).
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
the same, 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
but 235
{0235} Prime
ἀλλά
alla
{al-lah'}
Neuter plural of G0243; properly other things, that is, (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations).
2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
have pleasure 4909
{4909} Prime
συνευδοκέω
suneudokeo
{soon-yoo-dok-eh'-o}
From G4862 and G2106; to think well of in common, that is, assent to, feel gratified with.
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
in them that do 4238
{4238} Prime
πράσσω
prasso
{pras'-so}
A primary verb; to 'practise', that is, perform repeatedly or habitually (thus differing from G4160, which properly refers to a single act); by implication to execute, accomplish, etc.; specifically to collect (dues), fare (personally).
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
them.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Romans 1:32

_ _ Who knowing — from the voice of conscience, Romans 2:14, Romans 2:15

_ _ the judgment of God — the stern law of divine procedure.

_ _ that they which commit such things are worthy of death — here used in its widest known sense, as the uttermost of divine vengeance against sin: see Acts 28:4.

_ _ not only do the same — which they might do under the pressure of temptation and in the heat of passion.

_ _ but have pleasure in them that do them — deliberately set their seal to such actions by encouraging and applauding the doing of them in others. This is the climax of our apostle’s charges against the heathen; and certainly, if the things are in themselves as black as possible, this settled and unblushing satisfaction at the practice of them, apart from all the blinding effects of present passion, must be regarded as the darkest feature of human depravity.

_ _ On this section, Note

_ _ (1). “The wrath of God” against sin has all the dread reality of a “revelation from heaven” sounding in the consciences of men, in the self-inflicted miseries of the wicked, and in the vengeance which God’s moral government, sooner or later, takes upon all who outrage it; so this “wrath of God” is not confined to high-handed crimes, or the grosser manifestations of human depravity, but is “revealed” against all violations of divine law of whatever nature — “against all ungodliness” as well as “unrighteousness of men,” against all disregard of God in the conduct of life as well as against all deviations from moral rectitude; and therefore, since no child of Adam can plead guiltless either of “ungodliness” or of “unrighteousness,” to a greater or less extent, it follows that every human being is involved in the awful sweep of “the wrath of God” (Romans 1:18). The apostle places this terrible truth in the forefront of his argument on justification by faith, that upon the basis of universal condemnation he might rear the edifice of a free, world-wide salvation; nor can the Gospel be scripturally preached or embraced, save as the good news of salvation to those that are all equally “lost.”

_ _ (2). We must not magnify the supernatural revelation which God has been pleased to make of Himself, through Abraham’s family to the human race, at the expense of that older, and, in itself, lustrous revelation which He has made to the whole family of man through the medium of their own nature and the creation around them. Without the latter, the former would have been impossible, and those who have not been favored with the former will be without excuse, if they are deaf to the voice and blind to the glory of the latter (Romans 1:19, Romans 1:20).

_ _ (3). Willful resistance of light has a retributive tendency to blunt the moral perceptions and weaken the capacity to apprehend and approve of truth and goodness; and thus is the soul prepared to surrender itself, to an indefinite extent, to error and sin (Romans 1:21, etc.).

_ _ (4). Pride of wisdom, as it is a convincing evidence of the want of it, so it makes the attainment of it impossible (Romans 1:22; and compare Matthew 11:25; 1 Corinthians 3:18-20).

_ _ (5). As idolatry, even in its most plausible forms, is the fruit of unworthy views of the Godhead, so its natural effect is to vitiate and debase still further the religious conceptions; nor is there any depth of degradation too low and too revolting for men’s ideas of the Godhead to sink to, if only their natural temperament and the circumstances they are placed in be favorable to their unrestrained development (Romans 1:23, Romans 1:25). The apostle had Greece and Egypt in his eye when he penned this description. But all the paganisms of the East at this day attest its accuracy, from the more elaborate idolatry of India and the simpler and more stupid idolatry of China down to the childish rudiments of nature worship prevalent among the savage tribes. Alas! Christendom itself furnishes a melancholy illustration of this truth; the constant use of material images in the Church of Rome and the materialistic and sensuous character of its entire service (to say nothing of the less offensive but more stupid service of the Greek Church,) debasing the religious ideas of millions of nominal Christians, and lowering the whole character and tone of Christianity as represented within their immense pale.

_ _ (6). Moral corruption invariably follows religious debasement. The grossness of pagan idolatry is only equaled by the revolting character and frightful extent of the immoralities which it fostered and consecrated (Romans 1:24, Romans 1:26, Romans 1:27). And so strikingly is this to be seen in all its essential features in the East at this day, that (as Hodge says) the missionaries have frequently been accused by the natives of having forged the whole of the latter part of this chapter, as they could not believe that so accurate a description of themselves could have been written eighteen centuries ago. The kingdoms of Israel and Judah furnish a striking illustration of the inseparable connection between religion and morals. Israel corrupted and debased the worship of Jehovah, and the sins with which they were charged were mostly of the grosser kind — intemperance and sensuality: the people of Judah, remaining faithful to the pure worship, were for a long time charged mostly with formality and hypocrisy; and only as they fell into the idolatries of the heathen around them, did they sink into their vices. And may not a like distinction be observed between the two great divisions of Christendom, the Popish and the Protestant? To test this, we must not look to Popery, surrounded with, and more or less influenced by, the presence and power of Protestantism; nor to Protestantism under every sort of disadvantage, internal and external. But look at Romanism where it has unrestrained liberty to develop its true character, and see whether impurity does not there taint society to its core, pervading alike the highest and the lowest classes; and then look at Protestantism where it enjoys the same advantages, and see whether it be not marked by a comparatively high standard of social virtue.

_ _ (7). To take pleasure in what is sinful and vicious for its own sake, and knowing it to be such, is the last and lowest stage of human recklessness (Romans 1:32). But

_ _ (8). this knowledge can never be wholly extinguished in the breast of men. So long as reason remains to them, there is still a small voice in the worst of men, protesting, in the name of the Power that implanted it, “that they which do such things are worthy of death” (Romans 1:32).

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Romans 1:19-32.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Romans 1:32

Not only do the same, but have pleasure in those that practise them — This is the highest degree of wickedness. A man may be hurried by his passions to do the thing he hates; but he that has pleasure in those that do evil, loves wickedness for wickedness' sake. And hereby he encourages them in sin, and heaps the guilt of others upon his own head.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Romans 1:32

Who knowing the (o) judgment of God, that they which commit such things are worthy of death, not only do the same, but (p) have pleasure in them that do them.

(o) By the "judgment of God" he means that which the philosophers called the "law of nature", and the lawyers themselves termed the "law of nations".

(p) Are companions and partakers with them in their wickedness, and beside that, commend those who do wrong.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
knowing:

Romans 1:18 For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who hold the truth in unrighteousness;
Romans 1:21 Because that, when they knew God, they glorified [him] not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened.
Romans 2:1-5 Therefore thou art inexcusable, O man, whosoever thou art that judgest: for wherein thou judgest another, thou condemnest thyself; for thou that judgest doest the same things. ... But after thy hardness and impenitent heart treasurest up unto thyself wrath against the day of wrath and revelation of the righteous judgment of God;
Romans 2:21-23 Thou therefore which teachest another, teachest thou not thyself? thou that preachest a man should not steal, dost thou steal? ... Thou that makest thy boast of the law, through breaking the law dishonourest thou God?

worthy:

Romans 6:21 What fruit had ye then in those things whereof ye are now ashamed? for the end of those things [is] death.

have pleasure in them:
or, consent with them,
Psalms 50:18 When thou sawest a thief, then thou consentedst with him, and hast been partaker with adulterers.
Hosea 7:3 They make the king glad with their wickedness, and the princes with their lies.
Mark 14:10-11 And Judas Iscariot, one of the twelve, went unto the chief priests, to betray him unto them. ... And when they heard [it], they were glad, and promised to give him money. And he sought how he might conveniently betray him.
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