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Revelation 9:14 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— one saying to the sixth angel that had one trumpet, Loose the four angels that are bound at the great river Euphrates.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Saying to the sixth angel which had the trumpet, Loose the four angels which are bound in the great river Euphrates.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— one saying to the sixth angel who had the trumpet, “Release the four angels who are bound at the great river Euphrates.”
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Saying to the sixth angel who had the trumpet, Loose the four angels who are bound in the great river Euphrates.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— saying to the sixth angel that had the trumpet, Loose the four angels which are bound at the great river Euphrates.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— saying unto the sixth messenger, who was holding the trumpet—Loose the four messengers, who are bound at the great river Euphrates.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— saying to the sixth messenger who had the trumpet, 'Loose the four messengers who are bound at the great river Euphrates;'
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Saying to the sixth angel who had the trumpet: Loose the four angels who are bound in the great river Euphrates.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Saying to the sixt Angel which had the trumpet, Loose the foure Angels which are bound in the great riuer Euphrates.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— saying to the sixth angel who had the trumpet, Release the four angels which are bound in the great river Phraat.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— that said to the sixth angel having a trumpet: Loose the four angels that are bound at the great river Euphrates.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Saying 3004
{3004} Prime
λέγω
lego
{leg'-o}
A primary verb; properly to 'lay' forth, that is, (figuratively) relate (in words [usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas G2036 and G5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while G4483 is properly to break silence merely, and G2980 means an extended or random harangue]); by implication to mean.
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
to the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
sixth 1623
{1623} Prime
ἕκτος
hektos
{hek'-tos}
Ordinal from G1803; sixth.
angel 32
{0032} Prime
ἄγγελος
aggelos
{ang'-el-os}
From ἀγγέλλω [[aggello]] (probably derived from G0071; compare G0034; to bring tidings); a messenger; especially an 'angel'; by implication a pastor.
which 3739
{3739} Prime
ὅς
hos
{hos}
Probably a primary word (or perhaps a form of the article G3588); the relative (sometimes demonstrative) pronoun, who, which, what, that.
had 2192
{2192} Prime
ἔχω
echo
{ekh'-o}
A primary verb (including an alternate form σχέω [[scheo]], {skheh'-o}; used in certain tenses only); to hold (used in very various applications, literally or figuratively, direct or remote; such as possession, ability, contiguity, relation or condition).
z5707
<5707> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 855
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
trumpet, 4536
{4536} Prime
σάλπιγξ
salpigx
{sal'-pinx}
Perhaps from G4535 (through the idea of quavering or reverberation); a trumpet.
Loose 3089
{3089} Prime
λύω
luo
{loo'-o}
A primary verb; to 'loosen' (literally or figuratively).
z5657
<5657> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Imperative (See G5794)
Count - 376
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
four 5064
{5064} Prime
τέσσαρες
tessares
{tes'-sar-es}
Neuter and a plural number; four.
angels 32
{0032} Prime
ἄγγελος
aggelos
{ang'-el-os}
From ἀγγέλλω [[aggello]] (probably derived from G0071; compare G0034; to bring tidings); a messenger; especially an 'angel'; by implication a pastor.
which y3588
[3588] Standard

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
are bound 1210
{1210} Prime
δέω
deo
{deh'-o}
A primary verb; to bind (in various applications, literally or figuratively).
z5772
<5772> Grammar
Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 463
in 1909
{1909} Prime
ἐπί
epi
{ep-ee'}
A primary preposition properly meaning superimposition (of time, place, order, etc.), as a relation of distribution [with the genitive case], that is, over, upon, etc.; of rest (with the dative case) at, on, etc.; of direction (with the accusative case) towards, upon, etc.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
great 3173
{3173} Prime
μέγας
megas
{meg'-as}
Including the prolonged forms, feminine μεγάλη [[megale]], plural μέγάλοι [[megaloi]], etc.; compare also G3176, G3187], big (literally or figuratively, in a very wide application).
river 4215
{4215} Prime
ποταμός
potamos
{pot-am-os'}
Probably from a derivative of the alternate of G4095 (compare G4224); a current, brook or freshet (as drinkable), that is, running water.
Euphrates. 2166
{2166} Prime
Εὐφράτης
Euphrates
{yoo-frat'-ace}
Of foreign origin (compare [H6578]); Euphrates, a river of Asia.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Revelation 9:14

_ _ in, etc. — Greek,epi to potamo”; “on,” or “at the great river.”

_ _ Euphrates — (Compare Revelation 16:12). The river whereat Babylon, the ancient foe of God’s people was situated. Again, whether from the literal region of the Euphrates, or from the spiritual Babylon (the apostate Church, especially ROME), four angelic ministers of God’s judgments shall go forth, assembling an army of horsemen throughout the four quarters of the earth, to slay a third of men, the brunt of the visitation shall be on Palestine.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Revelation 9:13-21.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Revelation 9:14

Loose the four angels — To go every way; to the four quarters. These were evil angels, or they would not have been bound. Why, or how long, they were bound we know not.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Revelation 9:14

Saying to the sixth angel which had the trumpet, (12) Loose the four angels which are bound in the great river Euphrates.

(12) As if he should have said, these till now have been bound by the power of God, that they could not freely run over all men as they lusted, but were held and restrained at that great river of Euphrates, that is, in their spiritual Babylon (or this is a paraphrase of the spiritual Babylon, by the limits of the visible Babylon long since overthrown) that they might not commit those horrible slaughters, which they long breathed after. Now go to it, let loose those four angels, that is, administers of the wrath of God, in that number that is convenient to the slaughtering of the four quarters of the world: stir them up and give them the bridle, that rushing out of that Babylon of theirs, which is the seat of the wicked ones, they may fly over all the world, therein to rage, and most licentiously to practise their tyranny, as God has ordained. This was done when Gregory the ninth by public authority established as Law, his own Decretals, by which he might freely lay traps for the life of simple men. For who is it that sees not that the laws of Decretal, most of them are snares to catch souls with? Since that time (O good God) how many great slaughters have there been? How many great massacres? All history is full of them: and this our age abounds with most horrible and monstrous examples of the these.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
to the:

Revelation 8:2 And I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpets.
Revelation 8:6 And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.

loose:

Revelation 9:15 And the four angels were loosed, which were prepared for an hour, and a day, and a month, and a year, for to slay the third part of men.
Revelation 16:12 And the sixth angel poured out his vial upon the great river Euphrates; and the water thereof was dried up, that the way of the kings of the east might be prepared.

the great:

Genesis 2:14 And the name of the third river [is] Hiddekel: that [is] it which goeth toward the east of Assyria. And the fourth river [is] Euphrates.
2 Samuel 8:3 David smote also Hadadezer, the son of Rehob, king of Zobah, as he went to recover his border at the river Euphrates.
Jeremiah 51:63 And it shall be, when thou hast made an end of reading this book, [that] thou shalt bind a stone to it, and cast it into the midst of Euphrates:
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Gn 2:14. 2S 8:3. Jr 51:63. Rv 8:2, 6; 9:15; 16:12.

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