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Proverbs 3:7 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Be not wise in thine own eyes; Fear Jehovah, and depart from evil:
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Be not wise in thine own eyes: fear the LORD, and depart from evil.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Do not be wise in your own eyes; Fear the LORD and turn away from evil.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Be not wise in thy own eyes: fear the LORD, and depart from evil.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Be not wise in thine own eyes; fear Jehovah, and depart from evil:
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Do not become wise in thine own eyes, revere Yahweh, and avoid evil:
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— Be not wise in thine own eyes, Fear Jehovah, and turn aside from evil.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Be not wise in thy own conceit: fear God, and depart from evil:
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Be not wise in thine owne eyes: feare the LORD, and depart from euill.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— Be not wise in thine own conceit; but fear God, and depart from all evil.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— Be not wise in thine own eyes: fear Yahweh, and depart from evil.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Be x1961
(1961) Complement
הָיָה
hayah
{haw-yaw'}
A primitive root (compare H1933); to exist, that is, be or become, come to pass (always emphatic, and not a mere copula or auxiliary).
not x408
(0408) Complement
אַל
'al
{al}
A negative particle (akin to H3808); not (the qualified negation, used as a deprecative); once (Job 24:25) as a noun, nothing.
wise 2450
{2450} Prime
חָכָם
chakam
{khaw-kawm'}
From H2449; wise, (that is, intelligent, skilful or artful).
in thine own eyes: 5869
{5869} Prime
עַיִן
`ayin
{ah'-yin}
Probably a primitive word; an eye (literally or figuratively); by analogy a fountain (as the eye of the landscape).
fear 3372
{3372} Prime
יָרֵא
yare'
{yaw-ray'}
A primitive root; to fear; morally to revere; causatively to frighten.
z8798
<8798> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperative (See H8810)
Count - 2847
x853
(0853) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Apparently contracted from H0226 in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, even or namely).
Yhw יָהוֶה, 3068
{3068} Prime
יְהֹוָה
Y@hovah
{yeh-ho-vaw'}
From H1961; (the) self Existent or eternal; Jehovah, Jewish national name of God.
and depart 5493
{5493} Prime
סוּר
cuwr
{soor}
A primitive root; to turn off (literally or figuratively).
z8798
<8798> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperative (See H8810)
Count - 2847
from evil. 7451
{7451} Prime
רָע
ra`
{rah}
From H7489; bad or (as noun) evil (naturally or morally). This includes the second (feminine) form; as adjective or noun.
x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Proverbs 3:7

_ _ (Compare Proverbs 27:2; Romans 12:16).

_ _ fear ... evil — reverentially regarding His law.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Proverbs 3:7-12

_ _ We have here before us three exhortations, each of them enforced with a good reason: —

_ _ I. We must live in a humble and dutiful subjection to God and his government (Proverbs 3:7): “Fear the Lord, as your sovereign Lord and Master; be ruled in every thing by your religion and subject to the divine will.” This must be, 1. A humble subjection: Be not wise in thy own eyes. Note, There is not a greater enemy to the power of religion, and the fear of God in the heart, than conceitedness of our own wisdom. Those that have an opinion of their own sufficiency think it below them, and a disparagement to them, to take their measures from, much more to hamper themselves with, religion's rules. 2. A dutiful subjection: Fear the Lord, and depart from evil; take heed of doing any thing to offend him and to forfeit his care. To fear the Lord, so as to depart from evil, is true wisdom and understanding (Job 28:28); those that have it are truly wise, but self-denyingly so, and not wise in their own eyes. For our encouragement thus to live in the fear of God it is here promised (Proverbs 3:8) that it shall be as serviceable even to the outward man as our necessary food. It will be nourishing: It shall be health to thy navel. It will be strengthening: It shall be marrow to thy bones. The prudence, temperance, and sobriety, the calmness and composure of mind, and the good government of the appetites and passions, which religion teaches, tend very much not only to the health of the soul, but to a good habit of body, which is very desirable, and without which our other enjoyments in this world are insipid. Envy is the rottenness of the bones; the sorrow of the world dries them; but hope and joy in God are marrow to them.

_ _ II. We must make a good use of our estates, and that is the way to increase them, Proverbs 3:9, Proverbs 3:10. Here is,

_ _ 1. A precept which makes it our duty to serve God with our estates: Honour the Lord with thy substance. It is the end of our creation and redemption to honour God, to be to him for a name and a praise; we are no other way capable of serving him than in his honour. His honour we must show forth and the honour we have for him. We must honour him, not only with our bodies and spirits which are his, but with our estates too, for they also are his: we and all our appurtenances must be devoted to his glory. Worldly wealth is but poor substance, yet, such as it is, we must honour God with it, and then, if ever, it becomes substantial. We must honour God, (1.) With our increase. Where riches increase we are tempted to honour ourselves (Deuteronomy 8:17) and to set our hearts upon the world (Psalms 62:10); but the more God gives us the more we should study to honour him. It is meant of the increase of the earth, for we live upon annual products, to keep us in constant dependence on God. (2.) With all our increase. As God has prospered us in every thing, we must honour him. Our law will allow a prescription for a modus decimandia mode of tithing, but none de non decimandofor exemption from paying tithes. (3.) With the first-fruits of all, as Abel, Genesis 4:4. This was the law (Exodus 23:19), and the prophets, Malachi 3:10. God, who is the first and best, must have the first and best of every thing; his right is prior to all other, and therefore he must be served first. Note, It is our duty to make our worldly estates serviceable to our religion, to use them and the interest we have by them for the promoting of religion, to do good to the poor with what we have and abound in all works of piety and charity, devising liberal things.

_ _ 2. A promise, which makes it our interest to serve God with our estates. It is the way to make a little much, and much more; it is the surest and safest method of thriving: So shall thy barns be filled with plenty. He does not say thy bags, but thy barns, not thy wardrobe replenished, but thy presses: “God shall bless thee with an increase of that which is for use, not for show or ornament — for spending and laying out, not for hoarding and laying up.” Those that do good with what they have shall have more to do more good with. Note, If we make our worldly estates serviceable to our religion we shall find our religion very serviceable to the prosperity of our worldly affairs. Godliness has the promise of the life that now is and most of the comfort of it. We mistake if we think that giving will undo us and make us poor. No, giving for God's honour will make us rich, Haggai 2:19. What we gave we have.

_ _ III. We must conduct ourselves aright under our afflictions, Proverbs 3:11, Proverbs 3:12. This the apostle quotes (Hebrews 12:5), and calls it an exhortation which speaks unto us as unto children, with the authority and affection of a father. We are here in a world of troubles. Now observe,

_ _ 1. What must be our care when we are in affliction. We must neither despise it nor be weary of it. His exhortation, before, was to those that are rich and in prosperity, here to those that are poor and in adversity. (1.) We must not despise an affliction, be it ever so light and short, as if it were not worth taking notice of, or as if it were not sent on an errand and therefore required no answer. We must not be stocks, and stones, and stoics, under our afflictions, insensible of them, hardening ourselves under them, and concluding we can easily get through them without God. (2.) We must not be weary of an affliction, be it ever so heavy and long, not faint under it, so the apostle renders it, not be dispirited, dispossessed of our own souls, or driven to despair, or to use any indirect means for our relief and the redress of our grievances. We must not think that the affliction either presses harder or continues longer than is meet, not conclude that deliverance will never come because it does not come so soon as we expect it.

_ _ 2. What will be our comfort when we are in affliction. (1.) That it is a divine correction; it is the chastening of the Lord, which, as it is a reason why we should submit to it (for it is folly to contend with a God of incontestable sovereignty and irresistible power), so it is a reason why we should be satisfied in it; for we may be sure that a God of unspotted purity does us no wrong and that a God of infinite goodness means us no hurt. It is from God, and therefore must not be despised; for a slight put upon the messenger is an affront to him that sends him. It is from God, and therefore we must not be weary of it, for he knows our frame, both what we need and what we can bear. (2.) That it is a fatherly correction; it comes not from his vindictive justice as a Judge, but his wise affection as a Father. The father corrects the son whom he loves, nay, and because he loves him and desires he may be wise and good. He delights in that in his son which is amiable and agreeable, and therefore corrects him for the prevention and cure of that which would be a deformity to him, and an alloy to his delight in him. Thus God hath said, As many as I love I rebuke and chasten, Revelation 3:19. This is a great comfort to God's children, under their afflictions, [1.] That they not only consist with, but flow from, covenant-love. [2.] That they are so far from doing them any real hurt that, by the grace of God working with them, they do a great deal of good, and are happy means of their satisfaction.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

[[no comment]]

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

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Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
Be:

Proverbs 26:12 Seest thou a man wise in his own conceit? [there is] more hope of a fool than of him.
Isaiah 5:21 Woe unto [them that are] wise in their own eyes, and prudent in their own sight!
Romans 11:25 For I would not, brethren, that ye should be ignorant of this mystery, lest ye should be wise in your own conceits; that blindness in part is happened to Israel, until the fulness of the Gentiles be come in.
Romans 12:16 [Be] of the same mind one toward another. Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate. Be not wise in your own conceits.

fear:

Proverbs 14:27 The fear of the LORD [is] a fountain of life, to depart from the snares of death.
Proverbs 16:6 By mercy and truth iniquity is purged: and by the fear of the LORD [men] depart from evil.
Nehemiah 5:15 But the former governors that [had been] before me were chargeable unto the people, and had taken of them bread and wine, beside forty shekels of silver; yea, even their servants bare rule over the people: but so did not I, because of the fear of God.
Job 1:1 There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name [was] Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil.
Job 28:28 And unto man he said, Behold, the fear of the Lord, that [is] wisdom; and to depart from evil [is] understanding.
Psalms 34:11-14 Come, ye children, hearken unto me: I will teach you the fear of the LORD. ... Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.
Ecclesiastes 12:13 Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter: Fear God, and keep his commandments: for this [is] the whole [duty] of man.
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Chain-Reference Bible Search

Ne 5:15. Jb 1:1; 28:28. Ps 34:11. Pv 14:27; 16:6; 26:12. Ec 12:13. Is 5:21. Ro 11:25; 12:16.

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