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Matthew 8:22 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— But Jesus saith unto him, Follow me; and leave the dead to bury their own dead.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— But Jesus said unto him, Follow me; and let the dead bury their dead.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— But Jesus *said to him, “Follow Me, and allow the dead to bury their own dead.”
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— But Jesus said to him, Follow me; and let the dead bury their dead.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— But Jesus said to him, Follow me, and leave the dead to bury their own dead.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— But, Jesus, saith unto him,—Be following me, and leave, the dead, to bury, their own dead.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— and Jesus said to him, 'Follow me, and suffer the dead to bury their own dead.'
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— But Jesus said to him: Follow me, and let the dead bury their dead.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— But Iesus said vnto him, Follow me, & let the dead, bury their dead.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— But Jeshu said to him Come after me, and leave the dead ones burying their dead.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— But Jesus said to him: Follow thou me, and leave the dead to bury their dead.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
But 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
Jesus 2424
{2424} Prime
Ἰησοῦς
Iesous
{ee-ay-sooce'}
Of Hebrew origin [H3091]; Jesus (that is, Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites.
said 2036
{2036} Prime
ἔπω
epo
{ep'-o}
A primary verb (used only in the definite past tense, the others being borrowed from G2046, G4483 and G5346); to speak or say (by word or writting).
z5627
<5627> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2138 plus 1 in a variant reading in a footnote
unto him, 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
Follow 190
{0190} Prime
ἀκολουθέω
akoloutheo
{ak-ol-oo-theh'-o}
From G0001 (as a particle of union) and κέλευθος [[keleuthos]] (a road); properly to be in the same way with, that is, to accompany (specifically as a disciple).
z5720
<5720> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Imperative (See G5794)
Count - 592
me; 3427
{3427} Prime
μοί
moi
{moy}
The simpler form of G1698; to me.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
let 863
{0863} Prime
ἀφίημι
aphiemi
{af-ee'-ay-mee}
From G0575 and ἵημι [[hiemi]] (to send; an intensive form of εἶμι [[eimi]] (to go)); to send forth, in various applications.
z5628
<5628> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Imperative (See G5794)
Count - 459
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
dead 3498
{3498} Prime
νεκρός
nekros
{nek-ros'}
From an apparently primary word νέκυς [[nekus]] (a corpse); dead (literally or figuratively; also as noun).
bury 2290
{2290} Prime
θάπτω
thapto
{thap'-to}
A primary verb; to celebrate funeral rites, that is, inter.
z5658
<5658> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 516
their 1438
{1438} Prime
ἑαυτοῦ
heautou
{heh-ow-too'}
(Including all the other cases); from a reflexive pronoun otherwise obsolete and the genitive (dative or accusative) of G0846; him (her, it, them, also [in conjunction with the personal pronoun of the other persons] my, thy, our, your) -self (-selves), etc.
dead. 3498
{3498} Prime
νεκρός
nekros
{nek-ros'}
From an apparently primary word νέκυς [[nekus]] (a corpse); dead (literally or figuratively; also as noun).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

See commentary on Matthew 8:18-22.


Matthew 8:21-22

_ _ II. The procrastinating or entangled disciple.

_ _ As this is more fully given in Luke (Luke 9:59), we must take both together. “And He said unto another of His disciples, Follow Me. But he said,”

_ _ Lord, suffer me first to go and bury my father. But Jesus said unto him, Follow me; and let the dead bury their dead — or, as more definitely in Luke, “Let the dead bury their dead: but go thou and preach the kingdom of God” (Luke 9:60). This disciple did not, like the former, volunteer his services, but is called by the Lord Jesus, not only to follow, but to preach Him. And he is quite willing; only he is not ready just yet. “Lord, I will; but” — “There is a difficulty in the way just now; but that once removed, I am Thine.” What now is this difficulty? Was his father actually dead — lying a corpse — having only to be buried? Impossible. As it was the practice, as noticed on Luke 7:12, to bury on the day of death, it is not very likely that this disciple would have been here at all if his father had just breathed his last; nor would the Lord, if He was there, have hindered him discharging the last duties of a son to a father. No doubt it was the common case of a son having a frail or aged father, not likely to live long, whose head he thinks it his duty to see under the ground ere he goes abroad. “This aged father of mine will soon be removed; and if I might but delay till I see him decently interred, I should then be free to preach the kingdom of God wherever duty might call me.” This view of the case will explain the curt reply, “Let the dead bury their dead: but go thou and preach the kingdom of God.” Like all the other paradoxical sayings of our Lord, the key to it is the different senses — a higher and a lower — in which the same word “dead” is used: There are two kingdoms of God in existence upon earth; the kingdom of nature, and the kingdom of grace: To the one kingdom all the children of this world, even the most ungodly, are fully alive; to the other, only the children of light: The reigning irreligion consists not in indifference to the common humanities of social life, but to things spiritual and eternal: Fear not, therefore, that your father will in your absence be neglected, and that when he breathes his last there will not be relatives and friends ready enough to do to him the last offices of kindness. Your wish to discharge these yourself is natural, and to be allowed to do it a privilege not lightly to be foregone. But the kingdom of God lies now all neglected and needy: Its more exalted character few discern; to its paramount claims few are alive: and to “preach” it fewer still are qualified and called: But thou art: The Lord therefore hath need of thee: Leave, then, those claims of nature, high though they be, to those who are dead to the still higher claims of the kingdom of grace, which God is now erecting upon earth — Let the dead bury their dead; but go thou and preach the kingdom of God. And so have we here the genuine, but Procrastinating or Entangled Disciple.

_ _ The next case is recorded only by Luke:

_ _ III. The irresolute or wavering disciple (Luke 9:61, Luke 9:62).

_ _ Luke 9:61 :
_ _ And another also said, Lord, I will follow thee; but let me first go bid them farewell which are at home at my house.
_ _ Luke 9:62 :
_ _ And Jesus said unto him, No man, having put his hand to the plough, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God. But for the very different replies given, we should hardly have discerned the difference between this and the second case: the one man called, indeed, and the other volunteering, as did the first; but both seemingly alike willing, and only having a difficulty in their way just at that moment. But, by help of what is said respectively to each, we perceive the great difference between the two cases. From the warning given against “looking back,” it is evident that this man’s discipleship was not yet thorough, his separation from the world not entire. It is not a case of going back, but of looking back; and as there is here a manifest reference to the case of “Lot’s wife” (Genesis 19:26; and see on Luke 17:32), we see that it is not actual return to the world that we have here to deal with, but a reluctance to break with it. The figure of putting one’s hand to the plough and looking back is an exceedingly vivid one, and to an agricultural people most impressive. As ploughing requires an eye intent on the furrow to be made, and is marred the instant one turns about, so will they come short of salvation who prosecute the work of God with a distracted attention, a divided heart. The reference may be chiefly to ministers; but the application at least is general. As the image seems plainly to have been suggested by the case of Elijah and Elisha, a difficulty may be raised, requiring a moment’s attention. When Elijah cast his mantle about Elisha, which the youth quite understood to mean appointing him his successor, he was ploughing with twelve yoke of oxen, the last pair held by himself. Leaving his oxen, he ran after the prophet, and said, “Let me, I pray thee, kiss my father and my mother, and [then] I will follow thee.” Was this said in the same spirit with the same speech uttered by our disciple? Let us see. “And Elijah said unto him, Go back again: for what have I done to thee.” Commentators take this to mean that Elijah had really done nothing to hinder him from going on with all his ordinary duties. But to us it seems clear that Elijah’s intention was to try what manner of spirit the youth was of: — “Kiss thy father and mother? And why not? By all means, go home and stay with them; for what have I done to thee? I did but throw a mantle about thee; but what of that?” If this was his meaning, Elisha thoroughly apprehended and nobly met it. “He returned back from him, and took a yoke of oxen, and slew them, and boiled their flesh with the instruments of the oxen (the wood of his ploughing implements), and gave unto the people, and they did eat: then he arose, and went after Elijah, and ministered unto him” (1 Kings 19:19-21). We know not if even his father and mother had time to be called to this hasty feast. But this much is plain, that, though in affluent circumstances, he gave up his lower calling, with all its prospects, for the higher and at that time perilous, office to which he was called. What now is the bearing of these two cases? Did Elisha do wrong in bidding them farewell with whom he was associated in his early calling? Or, if not, would this disciple have done wrong if he had done the same thing, and in the same spirit, with Elisha? Clearly not. Elisha’s doing it proved that he could with safety do it; and our Lord’s warning is not against bidding them farewell which were at home at his house, but against the probable fatal consequences of that step; lest the embraces of earthly relationship should prove too strong for him, and he should never return to follow Christ. Accordingly, we have called this the Irresolute or Wavering Disciple.
Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Matthew 8:18-22.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Matthew 8:22

But Jesus said — When God calls, leave the business of the world to them who are dead to God.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

[[no comment]]

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
follow:

Matthew 4:18-22 And Jesus, walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brethren, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea: for they were fishers. ... And they immediately left the ship and their father, and followed him.
Matthew 9:9 And as Jesus passed forth from thence, he saw a man, named Matthew, sitting at the receipt of custom: and he saith unto him, Follow me. And he arose, and followed him.
John 1:43 The day following Jesus would go forth into Galilee, and findeth Philip, and saith unto him, Follow me.

and:

Luke 15:32 It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.
Ephesians 2:1 And you [hath he quickened], who were dead in trespasses and sins;
Ephesians 2:5 Even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved;)
Ephesians 5:14 Wherefore he saith, Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light.
Colossians 2:13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
1 Timothy 5:6 But she that liveth in pleasure is dead while she liveth.
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Mt 4:18; 9:9. Lk 15:32. Jn 1:43. Ep 2:1, 5; 5:14. Col 2:13. 1Ti 5:6.

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