Parallel Bible VersionsGreek Bible Study Tools

Matthew 6:5 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And when ye pray, ye shall not be as the hypocrites: for they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have received their reward.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites [are]: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— “When you pray, you are not to be like the hypocrites; for they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and on the street corners so that they may be seen by men. Truly I say to you, they have their reward in full.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites [are]: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues, and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen by men. Verily, I say to you, they have their reward.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites; for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets so that they should appear to men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And, when ye may be praying, ye shall not be as the hypocrites, because they love, in the synagogues, and at the corners of the broad ways, to take their stand and pray, that they may shine before men; Verily, I say unto you, they are getting back their reward.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— 'And when thou mayest pray, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites, because they love in the synagogues, and in the corners of the broad places—standing—to pray, that they may be seen of men; verily I say to you, that they have their reward.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And when ye pray, you shall not be as the hypocrites, that love to stand and pray in the synagogues and corners of the streets, that they may be seen by men: Amen I say to you, they have received their reward.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they loue to pray standing in the Synagogues, and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seene of men. Uerily I say vnto you, they haue their reward.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And when thou prayest, be not as the face-takers, who love to stand in the assemblies and at the corners of the streets to pray, that they may be seen of men; and truly I say to you that they receive their reward.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And when thou prayest. thou shalt not be like the hypocrites, who are fond of standing up in the synagogues and at the corners of streets to pray, so that they may be seen by people. Verily I say to you, they have gotten their reward.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
when 3752
{3752} Prime
ὅταν
hotan
{hot'-an}
From G3753 and G0302; whenever (implying hypothesis or more or less uncertainty); also causative (conjugationally) inasmuch as.
thou prayest, 4336
{4336} Prime
προσεύχομαι
proseuchomai
{pros-yoo'-khom-ahee}
From G4314 and G2172; to pray to God, that is, supplicate, worship.
z5741
<5741> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 40
thou shalt y2071
[2071] Standard
ἔσομαι
esomai
{es'-om-ahee}
Future tense of G1510; will be.
z0
<0000> Grammar
The original word in the Greek or Hebrew is translated by more than one word in the English. The English translation is separated by one or more other words from the original.
not 3756
{3756} Prime
οὐ
ou
{oo}
A primary word; the absolutely negative (compare G3361) adverb; no or not.
be 2071
{2071} Prime
ἔσομαι
esomai
{es'-om-ahee}
Future tense of G1510; will be.
z5704
<5704> Grammar
Tense - Future (See G5776)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 188
as 5618
{5618} Prime
ὥσπερ
hosper
{hoce'-per}
From G5613 and G4007; just as, that is, exactly like.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
hypocrites 5273
{5273} Prime
ὑποκριτής
hupokrites
{hoop-ok-ree-tace'}
From G5271; an actor under an assumed character (stage player), that is, (figuratively) a dissembler ('hypocrite').
[are]: for 3754
{3754} Prime
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
they love 5368
{5368} Prime
φιλέω
phileo
{fil-eh'-o}
From G5384; to be a friend to (fond of [an individual or an object]), that is, have affection for (denoting personal attachment, as a matter of sentiment or feeling; while G0025 is wider, embracing especially the judgment and the deliberate assent of the will as a matter of principle, duty and propriety: the two thus stand related very much as G2309 and G1014, or as G2372 and G3563 respectively; the former being chiefly of the heart and the latter of the head); specifically to kiss (as a mark of tenderness).
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
to pray 4336
{4336} Prime
προσεύχομαι
proseuchomai
{pros-yoo'-khom-ahee}
From G4314 and G2172; to pray to God, that is, supplicate, worship.
z5738
<5738> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 109
standing 2476
{2476} Prime
ἵστημι
histemi
{his'-tay-mee}
A prolonged form of a primary word στάω [[stao]], {stah'-o} (of the same meaning, and used for it in certain tenses); to stand (transitively or intransitively), used in various applications (literally or figuratively).
z5761
<5761> Grammar
Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 193
in 1722
{1722} Prime
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
synagogues 4864
{4864} Prime
συναγωγή
sunagoge
{soon-ag-o-gay'}
From (the reduplicated form of) G4863; an assemblage of persons; specifically a Jewish 'synagogue' (the meeting or the place); by analogy a Christian church.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
in 1722
{1722} Prime
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
corners 1137
{1137} Prime
γωνία
gonia
{go-nee'-ah}
Probably akin to G1119; an angle.
of the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
streets, 4113
{4113} Prime
πλατεῖα
plateia
{plat-i'-ah}
Feminine of G4116; a wide 'plat' or 'place', that is, open square.
that 3704
{3704} Prime
ὅπως
hopos
{hop'-oce}
From G3739 and G4459; what (-ever) how, that is, in the manner that (as adverb or conjugation of coincidence, intentional or actual).
they may y302
[0302] Standard
ἄν
an
{an}
A primary particle, denoting a supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty.
be seen 5316
{5316} Prime
φαίνω
phaino
{fah'-ee-no}
Prolongation for the base of G5457; to lighten (shine), that is, show (transitive or intransitive, literal or figurative).
z5652
<5652> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 20
x302
(0302) Complement
ἄν
an
{an}
A primary particle, denoting a supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty.
of men. 444
{0444} Prime
ἄνθρωπος
anthropos
{anth'-ro-pos}
From G0435 and ὤψ [[ops]] (the countenance; from G3700); manfaced, that is, a human being.
Verily 281
{0281} Prime
ἀμήν
amen
{am-ane'}
Of Hebrew origin [H0543]; properly firm, that is, (figuratively) trustworthy; adverbially surely (often as interjection so be it).
I say 3004
{3004} Prime
λέγω
lego
{leg'-o}
A primary verb; properly to 'lay' forth, that is, (figuratively) relate (in words [usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas G2036 and G5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while G4483 is properly to break silence merely, and G2980 means an extended or random harangue]); by implication to mean.
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
unto you, 5213
{5213} Prime
ὑμῖν
humin
{hoo-min'}
Irregular dative case of G5210; to (with or by) you.
y3754
[3754] Standard
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
They have 568
{0568} Prime
ἀπέχω
apecho
{ap-ekh'-o}
From G0575 and G2192; (active) to have out, that is, receive in full; (intransitive) to keep (oneself) away, that is, be distant (literally or figuratively).
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
their y846
[0846] Standard
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
x848
(0848) Complement
αὑτοῦ
hautou
{how-too'}
Contraction for G1438; self (in some oblique case or reflexive relation).
reward. 3408
{3408} Prime
μισθός
misthos
{mis-thos'}
Apparently a primary word; pay for service (literally or figuratively), good or bad.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Matthew 6:5

_ _ Matthew 6:5-6. Prayer.

_ _ And when thou prayest, thou shalt — or, preferably, “when ye pray ye shall.”

_ _ not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets — (See on Matthew 6:2).

_ _ that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have, etc. — The standing posture in prayer was the ancient practice, alike in the Jewish and in the early Christian Church. But of course this conspicuous posture opened the way for the ostentatious.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Matthew 6:5-8

_ _ In prayer we have more immediately to do with God than in giving alms, and therefore are yet more concerned to be sincere, which is what we are here directed to. When thou prayest (Matthew 6:5). It is taken for granted that all the disciples of Christ pray. As soon as ever Paul was converted, behold he prayeth. You may as soon find a living man that does not breathe, as a living Christian that does not pray. For this shall every one that is godly pray. If prayerless, then graceless. “Now, when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are, nor do as they do,” Matthew 6:2. Note, Those who would not do as the hypocrites do in their ways and actions must not be as the hypocrites are in their frame and temper. He names nobody, but it appears by Matthew 23:13, that by the hypocrites here he means especially the scribes and Pharisees.

_ _ Now there were two great faults they were guilty of in prayer, against each of which we are here cautioned — vain-glory (Matthew 6:5, Matthew 6:6); and vain repetitions, Matthew 6:7, Matthew 6:8.

_ _ I. We must not be proud and vain-glorious in prayer, nor aim at the praise of men. And here observe,

_ _ 1. What was the way and practice of the hypocrites. In all their exercises of devotion, it was plain, the chief thing they aimed at was to be commended by their neighbours, and thereby to make an interest for themselves. When they seemed to soar upwards in prayer (and if it be right, it is the soul's ascent toward God), yet even then their eye was downwards upon this as their prey. Observe,

_ _ (1.) What the places were which they chose for their devotions; they prayed in the synagogues, which were indeed proper places for public prayer, but not for personal. They pretended hereby to do honour to the place of their assemblies, but intended to do honour to themselves. They prayed in the corners of the streets, the broad streets (so the word signifies), which were most frequented. They withdrew thither, as if they were under a pious impulse which would not admit delay, but really it was to cause themselves to be taken notice of. There, where two streets met, they were not only within view of both, but every passenger turning close upon them would observe them, and hear what they said.

_ _ (2.) The posture they used in prayer; they prayed standing; this is a lawful and proper posture for prayer (Mark 11:25, When ye stand praying), but kneeling being the more humble and reverent gesture, Luke 22:41; Acts 7:60; Ephesians 3:14, their standing seemed to savour of pride and confidence in themselves (Luke 18:11), The Pharisee stood and prayed.

_ _ (3.) Their pride in choosing these public places, which is expressed in two things: [1.] They love to pray there. They did not love prayer for its own sake, but they loved it when it gave them an opportunity of making themselves noticed. Circumstances may be such, that our good deeds must needs be done openly, so as to fall under the observation of others, and be commended by them; but the sin and danger is when we love it, and are pleased with it, because it feeds the proud humour. [2.] It is that they may be seen of men; not that God might accept them, but that men might admire and applaud them; and that they might easily get the estates of widows and orphans into their hands (who would not trust such devout, praying men?) and that, when they had them, they might devour them without being suspected (Matthew 23:14); and effectually carry on their public designs to enslave the people.

_ _ (4.) The product of all this, they have their reward; they have all the recompence they must ever expect from God for their service, and a poor recompence it is. What will it avail us to have the good word of our fellow-servants, if our Master do not say, Well done? But if in so great a transaction as is between us and God, when we are at prayer, we can take in so poor a consideration as the praise of men is, it is just that that should be all our reward. They did it to be seen of men, and they are so; and much good may it do them. Note, Those that would approve themselves to God by their integrity in their religion, must have to regard to the praise of men; it is not to men that we pray, nor from them that we expect an answer; they are not to be our judges, they are dust and ashes like ourselves, and therefore we must not have our eye to them: what passes between God and our own souls must be out of sight. In our synagogue-worship, we must avoid every thing that tends to make our personal devotion remarkable, as they that caused their voice to be heard on high, Isaiah 58:4. Public places are not proper for private solemn prayer.

_ _ 2. What is the will of Jesus Christ in opposition to this. Humility and sincerity are the two great lessons that Christ teaches us; Thou, when thou prayest, do so and so (Matthew 6:6); thou in particular by thyself, and for thyself. Personal prayer is here supposed to be the duty and practice of all Christ's disciples.

_ _ Observe, (1.) The directions here given about it.

_ _ [1.] Instead of praying in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, enter into thy closet, into some place of privacy and retirement. Isaac went into the field (Genesis 24:63), Christ to a mountain, Peter to a housetop. No place amiss in point of ceremony, if it do but answer the end. Note, Secret prayer is to be performed in retirement, that we may be unobserved, and so may avoid ostentation; undisturbed, and so may avoid distraction; unheard, and so may use greater freedom; yet if the circumstances be such that we cannot possibly avoid being taken notice of, we must not therefore neglect the duty, lest the omission be a greater scandal than the observation of it.

_ _ [2.] Instead of doing it to be seen of men, pray to thy Father who is in secret; to me, even to me, Zechariah 7:5, Zechariah 7:6. The Pharisees prayed rather to men than to God; whatever was the form of their prayer, the scope of it was to beg the applause of men, and court their favours. “Well, do thou pray to God, and let that be enough for thee. Pray to him as a Father, as thy Father, ready to hear and answer, graciously inclined to pity, help, and succour thee. Pray to thy Father who is in secret.” Note, In secret prayer we must have an eye to God, as present in all places; he is there in thy closet when no one else is there; there especially nigh to thee in what thou callest upon him for. By secret prayer we give God the glory of his universal presence (Acts 17:24), and may take to ourselves the comfort of it.

_ _ (2.) The encouragements here given us to it.

_ _ [1.] Thy Father seeth in secret; his eye is upon thee to accept thee, when the eye of no man is upon thee to applaud thee; under the fig-tree, I saw thee, said Christ to Nathaniel, John 1:48. He saw Paul at prayer in such a street, at such a house, Acts 9:11. There is not a secret, sudden breathing after God, but he observes it.

_ _ [2.] He will reward thee openly; they have their reward that do it openly, and thou shalt not lose thine for thy doing it in secret. It is called a reward, but it is of grace, not of debt; what merit can there be in begging? The reward will be open; they shall not only have it, but have it honourably: the open reward is that which hypocrites are fond of, but they have not patience to stay for it; it is that which the sincere are dead to, and they shall have it over and above. Sometimes secret prayers are rewarded openly in this world by signal answers to them, which manifests God's praying people in the consciences of their adversaries; however, at the great day there will be an open reward, when all praying people shall appear in glory with the great Intercessor. The Pharisees ha their reward before all the town, and it was a mere flash and shadow; true Christians shall have theirs before all the world, angels and men, and it shall be a weight of glory.

_ _ II. We must not use vain repetitions in prayer, Matthew 6:7, Matthew 6:8. Though the life of prayer lies in lifting up the soul and pouring out the heart, yet there is some interest which words have in prayer, especially in joint prayer; for in that, words are necessary, and it should seem that our Saviour speaks here especially of that; for before he said, when thou prayest, he here, when ye pray; and the Lord's prayer which follows is a joint prayer, and in that, he that is the mouth of others is most tempted to an ostentation of language and expression, against which we are here warned; use not vain repetitions, either alone or with others: the Pharisees affected this, they made long prayers (Matthew 23:14), all their care was to make them long. Now observe,

_ _ 1. What the fault is that is here reproved and condemned; it is making a mere lip-labour of the duty of prayer, the service of the tongue, when it is not the service of the soul. This is expressed here by two words, Battologia, polulogia. (1.) Vain repetitions — tautology, battology, idle babbling over the same words again and again to no purpose, like Battus, Sub illis montibus erant, erant sub montibus illis; like that imitation of the wordiness of a fool, Ecclesiastes 10:14, A man cannot tell what shall be; and what shall be after him who can tell? which is indecent and nauseous in any discourse, much more in speaking to God. It is not all repetition in prayer that is here condemned, but vain repetitions. Christ himself prayed, saying the same words (Matthew 26:44), out of more than ordinary fervour and zeal, Luke 22:44. So Daniel, Daniel 9:18, Daniel 9:19. And there is a very elegant repetition of the same words, Ps. 136. It may be of use both to express our own affections, and to excite the affections of others. But the superstitious rehearsing of a tale of words, without regard to the sense of them, as the papists saying by their beads so many Ave-Marys and Paternosters; or the barren and dry going over of the same things again and again, merely to drill out the prayer to such a length, and to make a show of affection when really there is none; these are the vain repetitions here condemned. When we would fain say much, but cannot say much to the purpose; this is displeasing to God and all wise men. (2.) Much speaking, an affectation of prolixity in prayer, either out of pride or superstition, or an opinion that God needs either to be informed or argued with by us, or out of mere folly and impertinence, because men love to hear themselves talk. Not that all long prayers are forbidden; Christ prayed all night, Luke 6:12. Solomon's was a long prayer. There is sometimes need of long prayers when our errands and our affections are extraordinary; but merely to prolong the prayer, as if it would make it more pleasing or more prevailing with God, is that which is here condemned; it is not much praying that is condemned; no, we are bid to pray always, but much speaking; the danger of this error is when we only say our prayers, and not when we pray them. This caution is explained by that of Solomon (Ecclesiastes 5:2), Let thy words be few, considerate and well weighed; take with you words (Hosea 14:2), choose out words (Job 9:14), and do not say every thing that comes uppermost.

_ _ 2. What reasons are given against this.

_ _ (1.) This is the way of the heathen, as the heathen do; and it ill becomes Christians to worship their God as the Gentiles worship theirs. The heathen were taught by the light of nature to worship God; but becoming vain in their imaginations concerning the object of their worship, no wonder they became so concerning the manner of it, and particularly in this instance; thinking God altogether such a one as themselves, they thought he needed many words to make him understand what was said to him, or to bring him to comply with their requests; as if he were weak and ignorant, and hard to be entreated. Thus Baal's priests were hard at it from morning till almost night with their vain repetitions; O Baal, hear us; O Baal, hear us; and vain petitions they were; but Elijah, in a grave, composed frame, with a very concise prayer, prevailed for fire from heaven first, and then water, 1 Kings 18:26, 1 Kings 18:36. Lip-labour in prayer, though ever so well laboured, if that be all, is but lost labour.

_ _ (2.) “It need not be your way, for your Father in heaven knoweth what things ye have need of before ye ask him, and therefore there is no occasion for such abundance of words. It does not follow that therefore ye need not pray; for God requires you by prayer to own your need of him and dependence on him, and to please his promises; but therefore you are to open your case, and pour out your hearts before him, and then leave it with him.” Consider, [1.] The God we pray to is our Father by creation, by covenant; and therefore our addresses to him should be easy, natural, and unaffected; children do not use to make long speeches to their parents when they want any thing; it is enough to say, my head, my head. Let us come to him with the disposition of children, with love, reverence, and dependence; and then they need not say many words, that are taught by the Spirit of adoption to say that one aright, Abba, Father. [2.] He is a Father that knows our case and knows our wants better than we do ourselves. He knows what things we have need of; his eyes run to and fro through the earth, to observe the necessities of his people (2 Chronicles 16:9), and he often gives before we call (Isaiah 65:24), and more than we ask for (Ephesians 3:20), and if he do not give his people what they ask, it is because he knows they do not need it, and that it is not for their good; and of that he is fitter to judge for us than we for ourselves. We need not be long, nor use many words in representing our case; God knows it better than we can tell him, only he will know it from us (what will ye that I should do unto you?); and when we have told him what it is, we must refer ourselves to him, Lord, all my desire is before thee, Psalms 38:9. So far is God from being wrought upon by the length or language of our prayers, that the most powerful intercessions are those which are made with groanings that cannot be uttered, Romans 8:26. We are not to prescribe, but subscribe to God.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Matthew 6:5

The synagogues — These were properly the places where the people assembled for public prayer, and hearing the Scriptures read and expounded. They were in every city from the time of the Babylonish captivity, and had service in them thrice a day on three days in the week. In every synagogue was a council of grave and wise persons, over whom was a president, called the ruler of the synagogue. But the word here, as well as in many other texts, signifies any place of public concourse.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Matthew 6:5

(2) And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites [are]: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.

(2) He rebukes two revolting faults in prayer, ambition, and vain babbling.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
when:

Matthew 7:7-8 Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you: ... For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.
Matthew 9:38 Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth labourers into his harvest.
Matthew 21:22 And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive.
Psalms 5:2 Hearken unto the voice of my cry, my King, and my God: for unto thee will I pray.
Psalms 55:17 Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray, and cry aloud: and he shall hear my voice.
Proverbs 15:8 The sacrifice of the wicked [is] an abomination to the LORD: but the prayer of the upright [is] his delight.
Isaiah 55:6-7 Seek ye the LORD while he may be found, call ye upon him while he is near: ... Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts: and let him return unto the LORD, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.
Jeremiah 29:12 Then shall ye call upon me, and ye shall go and pray unto me, and I will hearken unto you.
Daniel 6:10 Now when Daniel knew that the writing was signed, he went into his house; and his windows being open in his chamber toward Jerusalem, he kneeled upon his knees three times a day, and prayed, and gave thanks before his God, as he did aforetime.
Daniel 9:4-19 And I prayed unto the LORD my God, and made my confession, and said, O Lord, the great and dreadful God, keeping the covenant and mercy to them that love him, and to them that keep his commandments; ... O Lord, hear; O Lord, forgive; O Lord, hearken and do; defer not, for thine own sake, O my God: for thy city and thy people are called by thy name.
Luke 18:1 And he spake a parable unto them [to this end], that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;
John 16:24 Hitherto have ye asked nothing in my name: ask, and ye shall receive, that your joy may be full.
Ephesians 6:18 Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints;
Colossians 4:2-3 Continue in prayer, and watch in the same with thanksgiving; ... Withal praying also for us, that God would open unto us a door of utterance, to speak the mystery of Christ, for which I am also in bonds:
1 Thessalonians 5:17 Pray without ceasing.
James 5:15-16 And the prayer of faith shall save the sick, and the Lord shall raise him up; and if he have committed sins, they shall be forgiven him. ... Confess [your] faults one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed. The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much.

thou shalt not:

Matthew 6:2 Therefore when thou doest [thine] alms, do not sound a trumpet before thee, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may have glory of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.
Matthew 23:14 Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye devour widows' houses, and for a pretence make long prayer: therefore ye shall receive the greater damnation.
Job 27:8-10 For what [is] the hope of the hypocrite, though he hath gained, when God taketh away his soul? ... Will he delight himself in the Almighty? will he always call upon God?
Isaiah 1:15 And when ye spread forth your hands, I will hide mine eyes from you: yea, when ye make many prayers, I will not hear: your hands are full of blood.
Luke 18:10-11 Two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. ... The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men [are], extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican.
Luke 20:47 Which devour widows' houses, and for a shew make long prayers: the same shall receive greater damnation.

for:

Matthew 23:6 And love the uppermost rooms at feasts, and the chief seats in the synagogues,
Mark 12:38 And he said unto them in his doctrine, Beware of the scribes, which love to go in long clothing, and [love] salutations in the marketplaces,
Luke 11:43 Woe unto you, Pharisees! for ye love the uppermost seats in the synagogues, and greetings in the markets.

Verily:

Matthew 6:2 Therefore when thou doest [thine] alms, do not sound a trumpet before thee, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may have glory of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.
Proverbs 16:5 Every one [that is] proud in heart [is] an abomination to the LORD: [though] hand [join] in hand, he shall not be unpunished.
Luke 14:12-14 Then said he also to him that bade him, When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor [thy] rich neighbours; lest they also bid thee again, and a recompence be made thee. ... And thou shalt be blessed; for they cannot recompense thee: for thou shalt be recompensed at the resurrection of the just.
James 4:6 But he giveth more grace. Wherefore he saith, God resisteth the proud, but giveth grace unto the humble.
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Jb 27:8. Ps 5:2; 55:17. Pv 15:8; 16:5. Is 1:15; 55:6. Jr 29:12. Dn 6:10; 9:4. Mt 6:2; 7:7; 9:38; 21:22; 23:6, 14. Mk 12:38. Lk 11:43; 14:12; 18:1, 10; 20:47. Jn 16:24. Ep 6:18. Col 4:2. 1Th 5:17. Jm 4:6; 5:15.

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