Parallel Bible VersionsGreek Bible Study Tools

Matthew 16:21 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— From that time began Jesus to show unto his disciples, that he must go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and the third day be raised up.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— From that time forth began Jesus to shew unto his disciples, how that he must go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised again the third day.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— From that time Jesus began to show His disciples that He must go to Jerusalem, and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised up on the third day.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— From that time forth Jesus began to show to his disciples, that he must go to Jerusalem, and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and be raised again the third day.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— From that time Jesus began to shew to his disciples that he must go away to Jerusalem, and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and the third day be raised.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— From that time, began Jesus Christ to be pointing out to his disciples that he must needs, into Jerusalem, go away, and, many things, suffer, from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be slain,—and on, the third day, arise.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— From that time began Jesus to shew to his disciples that it is necessary for him to go away to Jerusalem, and to suffer many things from the elders, and chief priests, and scribes, and to be put to death, and the third day to rise.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— From that time Jesus began to shew to his disciples, that he must go to Jerusalem, and suffer many things from the ancients and scribes and chief priests, and be put to death, and the third day rise again.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— From that time foorth began Iesus to shew vnto his disciples, how that he must goe vnto Hierusalem, and suffer many things of the Elders and chiefe Priests & Scribes, and be killed, and be raised againe the third day.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— AND from that time began Jeshu to show to his disciples that it was to be that he should go to Urishlem, and suffer much from the elders and the chief priests and scribes, and be slain, and the third day arise again.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And from that time Jesus began to show to his disciples, that he was to go up to Jerusalem, and to suffer much from the Elders, and from the chief priests and Scribes, and be killed, and on the third day arise.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
From 575
{0575} Prime
ἀπό
apo
{ap-o'}
A primary particle; 'off', that is, away (from something near), in various senses (of place, time, or relation; literally or figuratively).
that time forth 5119
{5119} Prime
τότε
tote
{tot'-eh}
From (the neuter of) G3588 and G3753; the when, that is, at the time that (of the past or future, also in consecution).
began 756
{0756} Prime
ἄρχομαι
archomai
{ar'-khom-ahee}
Middle voice of G0757 (through the implication of precedence); to commence (in order of time).
z5662
<5662> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Middle Deponent (See G5788)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 352
Jesus 2424
{2424} Prime
Ἰησοῦς
Iesous
{ee-ay-sooce'}
Of Hebrew origin [H3091]; Jesus (that is, Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites.
to shew 1166
{1166} Prime
δείκνυω
deiknuo
{dike-noo'-o}
A prolonged form of an obsolete primary of the same meaning; to show (literally or figuratively).
z5721
<5721> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 647
unto his y846
[0846] Standard
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
x848
(0848) Complement
αὑτοῦ
hautou
{how-too'}
Contraction for G1438; self (in some oblique case or reflexive relation).
disciples, 3101
{3101} Prime
μαθητής
mathetes
{math-ay-tes'}
From G3129; a learner, that is, pupil.
how that 3754
{3754} Prime
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
he 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
must 1163
{1163} Prime
δεῖ
dei
{die}
Third person singular active present of G1210; also δεόν [[deon]], {deh-on'}; which is neuter active participle of the same; both used impersonally; it is (was, etc.) necessary (as binding).
z5748
<5748> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 1612
go 565
{0565} Prime
ἀπέρχομαι
aperchomai
{ap-erkh'-om-ahee}
From G0575 and G2064; to go off (that is, depart), aside (that is, apart) or behind (that is, follow), literally or figuratively.
z5629
<5629> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 454
unto 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
Jerusalem, 2414
{2414} Prime
Ἱεροσόλυμα
Hierosoluma
{hee-er-os-ol'-oo-mah}
Of Hebrew origin [H3389]; Hierosolyma (that is, Jerushalaim), the capital of Palestine.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
suffer 3958
{3958} Prime
πάσχω
pascho
{pas'-kho}
Apparently a primary verb (the third form used only in certain tenses for it); to experience a sensation or impression (usually painful).
z5629
<5629> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 454
many things 4183
{4183} Prime
πολύς
polus
{pol-oos'}
Including the forms from the alternate 'pollos'; (singular) much (in any respect) or (plural) many; neuter (singular) as adverb largely; neuter (plural) as adverb or noun often, mostly, largely.
of 575
{0575} Prime
ἀπό
apo
{ap-o'}
A primary particle; 'off', that is, away (from something near), in various senses (of place, time, or relation; literally or figuratively).
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
elders 4245
{4245} Prime
πρεσβύτερος
presbuteros
{pres-boo'-ter-os}
Comparative of πρέσβυς [[presbus]] (elderly); older; as noun, a senior; specifically an Israelite Sanhedrist (also figuratively, member of the celestial council) or Christian 'presbyter'.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
chief priests 749
{0749} Prime
ἀρχιερεύς
archiereus
{ar-khee-er-yuce'}
From G0746 and G2409; the high priest (literally of the Jews, typically Christ); by extension a chief priest.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
scribes, 1122
{1122} Prime
γραμματεύς
grammateus
{gram-mat-yooce'}
From G1121; a writer, that is, (professionally) scribe or secretary.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
be killed, 615
{0615} Prime
ἀποκτείνω
apokteino
{ap-ok-ti'-no}
From G0575 and κτείνω [[kteino]] (to slay); to kill outright; figuratively to destroy.
z5683
<5683> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 159
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
be raised again 1453
{1453} Prime
ἐγείρω
egeiro
{eg-i'-ro}
Probably akin to the base of G0058 (through the idea of collecting one's faculties); to waken (transitively or intransitively), that is, rouse (literally from sleep, from sitting or lying, from disease, from death; or figuratively from obscurity, inactivity, ruins, nonexistence).
z5683
<5683> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 159
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
third 5154
{5154} Prime
τρίτος
tritos
{tree'-tos}
From G5140; third; neuter (as noun) a third part, or (as adverb) a (or the) third time, thirdly.
day. 2250
{2250} Prime
ἡμέρα
hemera
{hay-mer'-ah}
Feminine (with G5610 implied) of a derivative of ἧμαι [[hemai]] (to sit; akin to the base of G1476) meaning tame, that is, gentle; day, that is, (literally) the time space between dawn and dark, or the whole 24 hours (but several days were usually reckoned by the Jews as inclusive of the parts of both extremes); figuratively a period (always defined more or less clearly by the context).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Matthew 16:21

_ _ Matthew 16:21-28. Announcement of His approaching death and rebuke of Peter.

_ _ The occasion here is evidently the same.

_ _ From that time forth began Jesus to show unto his disciples — that is, with an explicitness and frequency He had never observed before.

_ _ how that he must go unto Jerusalem and suffer many things — “and be rejected,” (Mark 8:31; Luke 9:22).

_ _ of the elders and chief priests and scribes — not as before, merely by not receiving Him, but by formal deeds.

_ _ and be killed, and be raised again the third day — Mark (Mark 8:32) adds, that “He spake that saying openly” — “explicitly,” or “without disguise.”

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Matthew 16:21-23

_ _ We have here Christ's discourse with his disciples concerning his own sufferings; in which observe,

_ _ I. Christ's foretelling of his sufferings. Now he began to do it, and from this time he frequently spake of them. Some hints he had already given of his sufferings, as when he said, Destroy this temple: when he spake of the Son of man being lifted up, and of eating his flesh, and drinking his blood: but now he began to show it, to speak plainly and expressly of it. Hitherto he had not touched upon this, because the disciples were weak, and could not well bear the notice of a thing so very strange, and so very melancholy; but now that they were more ripe in knowledge, and strong in faith, he began to tell them this. Note, Christ reveals his mind to his people gradually, and lets in light as they can bear it, and are fit to receive it.

_ _ From that time, when they had made that full confession of Christ, that he was the Son of God, then he began to show them this. When he found them knowing in one truth, he taught them another; for to him that has, shall be given. Let them first be established in the principles of the doctrine of Christ, and then go on to perfection, Hebrews 6:1. If they had not been well grounded in the belief of Christ's being the Son of God, it would have been a great shaking to their faith. All truths are not to be spoken to all persons at all times, but such as are proper and suitable to their present state. Now observe,

_ _ 1. What he foretold concerning his sufferings, the particulars and circumstances of them, and all surprising.

_ _ (1.) The place where he should suffer. He must go to Jerusalem, the head city, the holy city, and suffer there. Though he lived most of his time in Galilee, he must die at Jerusalem; there all the sacrifices were offered, there therefore he must die, who is the great sacrifice.

_ _ (2.) The persons by whom he should suffer; the elders, and chief priests, and scribes; these made up the great sanhedrim, which sat at Jerusalem, and was had in veneration by the people. Those that should have been most forward in owning and admiring Christ, were the most bitter in persecuting him. It was strange that men of knowledge in the scripture, who professed to expect the Messiah's coming, and pretended to have something sacred in their character, should use him thus barbarously when he did come. It was the Roman power that condemned and crucified Christ, but he lays it at the door of the chief priests and scribes, who were the first movers.

_ _ (3.) What he should suffer; he must suffer many things, and be killed. His enemies' insatiable malice, and his own invincible patience, appear in the variety and multiplicity of his sufferings (he suffered many things) and in the extremity of them; nothing less than his death would satisfy them, he must be killed. The suffering of many things, if not unto death, is more tolerable; for while there is life, there is hope; and death, without such prefaces, would be less terrible; but he must first suffer many things, and then be killed.

_ _ (4.) What should be the happy issue of all his sufferings; he shall be raised again the third day. As the prophets, so Christ himself, when he testified beforehand his sufferings, testified withal the glory that should follow, 1 Peter 1:11. His rising again the third day proved him to be the Son of God, notwithstanding his sufferings; and therefore he mentions that, to keep up their faith. When he spoke of the cross and the shame, he spoke in the same breath of the joy set before him, in the prospect of which he endured the cross, and despised the shame. Thus we must look upon Christ's suffering for us, trace in it the way to his glory; and thus we must look upon our suffering for Christ, look through it to the recompence of reward. If we suffer with him, we shall reign with him.

_ _ 2. Why he foretold his sufferings. (1.) To show that they were the product of an eternal counsel and consent; were agreed upon between the Father and the Son from eternity; Thus is behoved Christ to suffer. The matter was settled in the determinate counsel and foreknowledge, in pursuance of his own voluntary susception and undertaking for our salvation; his sufferings were no surprise to him, did not come upon him as a snare, but he had a distinct and certain foresight of them, which greatly magnifies his love, John 18:4. (2.) To rectify the mistakes which his disciples had imbibed concerning the external pomp and power of his kingdom. Believing him to be the Messiah, they counted upon nothing but dignity and authority in the world; but here Christ reads them another lesson, tells them of the cross and sufferings; nay, that the chief priests and the elders, whom, it is likely, they expected to be the supports of the Messiah's kingdom, should be its great enemies and persecutors; this would give them quite another idea of that kingdom which they themselves had preached the approach of; and it was requisite that this mistake should be rectified. Those that follow Christ must be dealt plainly with, and warned not to expect great things in this world. (3.) It was to prepare them for the share, at least, of sorrow and fear, which they must have in his sufferings. When he suffered many things, the disciples could not but suffer some; if their Master be killed, they will be seized with terror; let them know it before, that they may provide accordingly, and, being fore-warned, may be fore-armed.

_ _ II. The offence which Peter took at this he said, Be it far from thee, Lord: probably he spake the sense of the rest of the disciples, as before, for he was chief speaker. He took him, and began to rebuke him. Perhaps Peter was a little elevated with the great things Christ had how said unto him, which made him more bold with Christ than did become him; so hard is it to keep the spirit low and humble in the midst of great advancements!

_ _ 1. It did not become Peter to contradict his Master, or take upon him to advise him; he might have wished, that, if it were possible, this cup might pass away, without saying so peremptorily, This shall not be, when Christ had said, It must be. Shall any teach God knowledge? He that reproveth God, let him answer it. Note, When God's dispensations are either intricate or cross to us, it becomes us silently to acquiesce in, and not to prescribe to, the divine will; God knows what he has to do, without our teaching. Unless we know the mind of the Lord, it is not for us to be his counsellors, Romans 11:34.

_ _ 2. It savoured much of fleshly wisdom, for him to appear so warmly against suffering, and to startle thus at the offence of the cross. It is the corrupt part of us, that is thus solicitous to sleep in a whole skin. We are apt to look upon sufferings as they relate to this present life, to which they are uneasy; but there are other rules to measure them by, which, if duly observed, will enable us cheerfully to bear them, Romans 8:18. See how passionately Peter speaks: “Be it far from thee, Lord. God forbid, that thou shouldst suffer and be killed; we cannot bear the thoughts of it.” Master, spare thyself: so it might be read; hiles so kurie — “Be merciful to thyself, and then no one else can be cruel to thee; pity thyself, and then this shall not be to thee.” He would have Christ to dread suffering as much as he did; but we mistake, if we measure Christ's love and patience by our own. He intimates, likewise, the improbability of the thing, humanly speaking; “This shall not be unto thee. It is impossible that one who hath so great an interest in the people as thou hast, should be crushed by the elders, who fear the people: this can never be; we that have followed thee, will fight for thee, if occasion be; and there are thousands that will stand by us.”

_ _ III. Christ's displeasure against Peter for this suggestion of his, Matthew 16:23. We do not read of any thing said or done by any of his disciples, at any time, that he resented so much as this, though they often offended.

_ _ Observe, 1. How he expressed his displeasure: He turned upon Peter, and (we may suppose) with a frown said, Get thee behind me, Satan. He did not so much as take time to deliberate upon it, but gave an immediate reply to the temptation, which was such as made it to appear how ill he took it. Just now, he had said, Blessed art thou, Simon, and had even laid him in his bosom; but here, Get thee behind me, Satan; and there was cause for both. Note, A good man may by a surprise of temptation soon grow very unlike himself. He answered him as he did Satan himself, Matthew 4:10. Note, (1.) It is the subtlety of Satan, to send temptations to us by the unsuspected hands of our best and dearest friends. Thus he assaulted Adam by Eve, Job by his wife, and here Christ by his beloved Peter. It concerns us therefore not to be ignorant of his devices, but to stand against his wiles and depths, by standing always upon our guard against sin, whoever moves us to it. Even the kindnesses of our friends are often abused by Satan, and made use of as temptations to us. (2.) Those who have their spiritual senses exercised, will be aware of the voice of Satan, even in a friend, a disciple, a minister, that dissuades them from their duty. We must not regard who speaks, so much as what is spoken; we should learn to know the devil's voice when he speaks in a saint as well as when he speaks in a serpent. Whoever takes us off from that which is good, and would have us afraid of doing too much for God, speaks Satan's language. (3.) We must be free and faithful in reproving the dearest friend we have, that saith or doth amiss, though it may be under colour of kindness to us. We must not compliment, but rebuke, mistaken courtesies. Faithful are the wounds of a friend. Such smitings must be accounted kindnesses, Psalms 141:5. (4.) Whatever appears to be a temptation to sin, must be resisted with abhorrence, and not parleyed with.

_ _ 2. What was the ground of this displeasure; why did Christ thus resent a motion that seemed not only harmless, but kind? Two reasons are given:

_ _ (1.) Thou art an offence to meSkandalon mou eiThou art my hindrance (so it may be read); “thou standest in my way.” Christ was hastening on in the work of our salvation, and his heart was so much upon it, that he took it ill to be hindered, or tempted to start back from the hardest and most discouraging part of his undertaking. So strongly was he engaged for our redemption, that they who but indirectly endeavoured to divert him from it, touched him in a very tender and sensible part. Peter was not so sharply reproved for disowning and denying his Master in his sufferings as he was for dissuading him from them; though that was the defect, this the excess, of kindness. It argues a very great firmness and resolution of mind in any business, when it is an offence to be dissuaded, and a man will not endure to hear any thing to the contrary; like that of Ruth, Entreat me not to leave thee. Note, Our Lord Jesus preferred our salvation before his own ease and safety; for even Christ pleased not himself (Romans 15:3); he came into the world, not to spare himself, as Peter advised, but to spend himself.

_ _ See why he called Peter Satan, when he suggested this to him; because, whatever stood in the way of our salvation, he looked upon as coming from the devil, who is a sworn enemy to it. The same Satan that afterward entered into Judas, maliciously to destroy him in his undertaking, here prompted Peter plausibly to divert him from it. Thus he changes himself into an angel of light.

_ _ Thou art an offence to me. Note, [1.] Those that engage in any great good work must expect to meet with hindrance and opposition from friends and foes, from within and from without. [2.] Those that obstruct our progress in any duty must be looked upon as an offence to us. Then we do the will of God as Christ did, whose meat and drink it was to do it, when it is a trouble to us to be solicited from our duty. Those that hinder us from doing or suffering for God, when we are called to it, whatever they are in other things in that they are Satans, adversaries to us.

_ _ (2.) Thou savourest not the things that are of God, but those that are of men. Note, [1.] The things that are of God, that is, the concerns of his will and glory, often clash and interfere with the things that are of men, that is, with our own wealth, pleasure, and reputation. While we mind Christian duty as out way and work, and the divine favour as our end and portion, we savour the things of God; but if these be minded, the flesh must be denied, hazards must be run and hardships borne; and here is the trial which of the two we savour. [2.] Those that inordinately fear, and industriously decline suffering for Christ, when they are called to it, savour more of the things of man than of the things of God; they relish those things more themselves, and make it appear to others that they do so.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Matthew 16:21

From that time Jesus began to tell his disciples, that he must suffer many things — Perhaps this expression, began, always implied his entering on a set and solemn discourse. Hitherto he had mainly taught them only one point, That he was the Christ. From this time he taught them another, That Christ must through sufferings and death enter into his glory. From the elders — The most honourable and experienced men; the chief priests — Accounted the most religious; and the scribes — The most learned body of men in the nation. Would not one have expected, that these should have been the very first to receive him? But not many wise, not many noble were called. Favour thyself — The advice of the world, the flesh, and the devil, to every one of our Lord's followers. Mark 8:31; Luke 9:22.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Matthew 16:21

(8) From that time forth began Jesus to shew unto his disciples, how that he must go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the (p) elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised again the third day.

(8) The minds of men are at this time to be prepared and made ready against the stumbling block of persecution.

(p) It was a name of dignity and not of age: and it is used for those who were the judges, whom the Hebrews call the Sanhedrin.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
began:

Matthew 17:22-23 And while they abode in Galilee, Jesus said unto them, The Son of man shall be betrayed into the hands of men: ... And they shall kill him, and the third day he shall be raised again. And they were exceeding sorry.
Matthew 20:17-19 And Jesus going up to Jerusalem took the twelve disciples apart in the way, and said unto them, ... And shall deliver him to the Gentiles to mock, and to scourge, and to crucify [him]: and the third day he shall rise again.
Matthew 20:28 Even as the Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many.
Matthew 26:2 Ye know that after two days is [the feast of] the passover, and the Son of man is betrayed to be crucified.
Mark 8:31 And he began to teach them, that the Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected of the elders, and [of] the chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again.
Mark 9:31-32 For he taught his disciples, and said unto them, The Son of man is delivered into the hands of men, and they shall kill him; and after that he is killed, he shall rise the third day. ... But they understood not that saying, and were afraid to ask him.
Mark 10:32-34 And they were in the way going up to Jerusalem; and Jesus went before them: and they were amazed; and as they followed, they were afraid. And he took again the twelve, and began to tell them what things should happen unto him, ... And they shall mock him, and shall scourge him, and shall spit upon him, and shall kill him: and the third day he shall rise again.
Luke 9:22 Saying, The Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be slain, and be raised the third day.
Luke 9:31 Who appeared in glory, and spake of his decease which he should accomplish at Jerusalem.
Luke 9:44-45 Let these sayings sink down into your ears: for the Son of man shall be delivered into the hands of men. ... But they understood not this saying, and it was hid from them, that they perceived it not: and they feared to ask him of that saying.
Luke 18:31-34 Then he took [unto him] the twelve, and said unto them, Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and all things that are written by the prophets concerning the Son of man shall be accomplished. ... And they understood none of these things: and this saying was hid from them, neither knew they the things which were spoken.
Luke 24:6-7 He is not here, but is risen: remember how he spake unto you when he was yet in Galilee, ... Saying, The Son of man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again.
Luke 24:26-27 Ought not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory? ... And beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself.
Luke 24:46 And said unto them, Thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day:
1 Corinthians 15:3-4 For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; ... And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:

chief priests:

Matthew 26:47 And while he yet spake, lo, Judas, one of the twelve, came, and with him a great multitude with swords and staves, from the chief priests and elders of the people.
Matthew 27:12 And when he was accused of the chief priests and elders, he answered nothing.
1 Chronicles 24:1-19 Now [these are] the divisions of the sons of Aaron. The sons of Aaron; Nadab, and Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar. ... These [were] the orderings of them in their service to come into the house of the LORD, according to their manner, under Aaron their father, as the LORD God of Israel had commanded him.
Nehemiah 12:7 Sallu, Amok, Hilkiah, Jedaiah. These [were] the chief of the priests and of their brethren in the days of Jeshua.

and be:

Matthew 27:63 Saying, Sir, we remember that that deceiver said, while he was yet alive, After three days I will rise again.
John 2:19-21 Jesus answered and said unto them, Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up. ... But he spake of the temple of his body.
Acts 2:23-32 Him, being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain: ... This Jesus hath God raised up, whereof we all are witnesses.
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1Ch 24:1. Ne 12:7. Mt 17:22; 20:17, 28; 26:2, 47; 27:12, 63. Mk 8:31; 9:31; 10:32. Lk 9:22, 31, 44; 18:31; 24:6, 26, 46. Jn 2:19. Ac 2:23. 1Co 15:3.

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