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Mark 8:22 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And they come unto Bethsaida. And they bring to him a blind man, and beseech him to touch him.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And he cometh to Bethsaida; and they bring a blind man unto him, and besought him to touch him.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— And they *came to Bethsaida. And they *brought a blind man to Jesus and *implored Him to touch him.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And he cometh to Bethsaida; and they bring a blind man to him, and besought him to touch him.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And he comes to Bethsaida; and they bring him a blind man, and beseech him that he might touch him.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And they come into Bethsaida. And they bring unto him one blind, and beseech him that him, he would touch.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And he cometh to Bethsaida, and they bring to him one blind, and call upon him that he may touch him,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And they came to Bethsaida: and they bring to him a blind man. And they besought him that he would touch him.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And he commeth to Bethsaida, and they bring a blind man vnto him, and besought him to touch him:
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And he came to Beth-tsaida; and they brought to him a blind man, and prayed of him to touch him.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And he came to Bethsaida: and they brought to him a blind man, and besought him to touch him.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
he cometh 2064
{2064} Prime
ἔρχομαι
erchomai
{er'-khom-ahee}
Middle voice of a primary verb (used only in the present and imperfect tenses, the others being supplied by a kindred [middle voice] word, ἐλεύθομαι [[eleuthomai]], {el-yoo'-thom-ahee}; or [active] ἔλθω [[eltho]], {el'-tho}; which do not otherwise occur); to come or go (in a great variety of applications, literally and figuratively).
z5736
<5736> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 618
to 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
Bethsaida; 966
{0966} Prime
Βηθσαϊδά[ν]
Bethsaida
{bayth-sahee-dah'}
Of Chaldee origin (compare [H1004] and [H6719]); fishing house; Bethsaida, a place in Palestine.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
they bring 5342
{5342} Prime
φέρω
phero
{fer'-o}
A primary verb (for which other and apparently not cognate ones are used in certain tenses only; namely οἴω [[oio]], {oy'-o}; and ἐνέγκω [[enegko]], {en-eng'-ko}); to 'bear' or carry (in a very wide application, literally and figuratively.
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
a blind man 5185
{5185} Prime
τυφλός
tuphlos
{toof-los'}
From G5187; opaque (as if smoky), that is, (by analogy) blind (physically or mentally).
unto him, 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
besought 3870
{3870} Prime
παρακαλέω
parakaleo
{par-ak-al-eh'-o}
From G3844 and G2564; to call near, that is, invite, invoke (by imploration, hortation or consolation).
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
him 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
to 2443
{2443} Prime
ἵνα
hina
{hin'-ah}
Probably from the same as the former part of G1438 (through the demonstrative idea; compare G3588); in order that (denoting the purpose or the result).
touch 680
{0680} Prime
ἅπτομαι
haptomai
{hap'-tom-ahee}
Reflexive of G0681; properly to attach oneself to, that is, to touch (in many implied relations).
z5672
<5672> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Middle (See G5785)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 43
him. 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Mark 8:22

_ _ Mark 8:22-26. Blind man at Bethsaida restored to sight.

_ _ And he cometh to Bethsaida — Bethsaida Julias, on the northeast side of the lake, whence after this He proceeded to Caesarea Philippi (Mark 8:27).

_ _ and they bring a blind man unto him, and besought him to touch him — See on Mark 7:32.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Mark 8:22-26

_ _ This cure is related only by this evangelist, and there is something singular in the circumstances.

_ _ I. Here is a blind man brought to Christ by his friends, with a desire that he would touch him, Mark 8:22. Here appears the faith of those that brought him — they doubted not but that one touch of Christ's hand would recover him his sight; but the man himself showed not that earnestness for, or expectation of, a cure that other blind men did. If those that are spiritually blind, do not pray for themselves, yet let their friends and relations pray for them, that Christ would be pleased to touch them.

_ _ II. Here is Christ leading this blind man, Mark 8:23. He did not bid his friends lead him, but (which bespeaks his wonderful condescension) he himself took him by the hand, and led him, to teach us to be as Job was, eyes to the blind, Job 29:15. Never had poor blind man such a Leader. He led him out of the town. Had he herein only designed privacy, he might have led him into a house, into an inner chamber, and have cured him there; but he intended hereby to upbraid Bethsaida with the mighty works that had in vain been done in her (Matthew 11:21), and was telling her, in effect, she was unworthy to have any more done within her walls. Perhaps Christ took the blind man out of the town, that he might have a larger prospect in the open fields, to try his sight with, than he could have in the close streets.

_ _ III. Here is the cure of the blind man, by that blessed Oculist, who came into the world to preach the recovering of sight to the blind (Luke 4:18), and to give what he preached. In this cure we may observe, 1. That Christ used a sign; he spat on his eyes (spat into them, so some), and put his hand upon him. He could have cured him, as he did others, with a word speaking, but thus he was pleased to assist his faith which was very weak, and to help him against his unbelief. And this spittle signified the eye-salve wherewith Christ anoints the eyes of those that are spiritually blind, Revelation 3:18. 2. That the cure was wrought gradually, which was not usual in Christ's miracles. He asked him if he saw aught, Mark 8:23. Let him tell what condition his sight was in, for the satisfaction of those about him. And he looked up; so far he recovered his sight, that he could open his eyes, and he said, I see men as trees walking; he could not distinguish men from trees, otherwise than he could discern them to move. He had some glimmerings of sight, and betwixt him and the sky could perceive a man erect like a tree, but could not discern the form thereof, Job 4:16. But, 3. It was soon completed; Christ never doeth his work by the halves, nor leaves it till he can say, It is finished. He put his hands again upon his eyes, to disperse the remaining darkness, and then bade him look up again, and he saw every man clearly, Mark 8:25. Now Christ took this way, (1.) Because he would not tie himself to a method, but would show with what liberty he acted in all he did. He did not cure by rote, as I may say, and in a road, but varied as he thought fit. Providence gains the same end in different ways, that men may attend its motions with an implicit faith. (2.) Because it should be to the patient according to his faith; and perhaps this man's faith was at first very weak, but afterward gathered strength, and accordingly his cure was. Not that Christ always went by this rule, but thus he would sometimes put a rebuke upon those who came to him, doubting. (3.) Thus Christ would show how, and in what method, those are healed by his grace, who by nature are spiritually blind; at first, their knowledge is confused, they see men as trees walking; but, like the light of the morning, it shines more and more to the perfect day, and then they see all things clearly, Proverbs 4:18. Let us enquire then, if we see aught of those things which faith is the substance and evidence of; and if through grace we see any thing of them, we may hope that we shall see yet more and more, for Jesus Christ will perfect for ever those that are sanctified.

_ _ IV. The directions Christ gave the man he had cured, not to tell it to any in the town of Bethsaida, nor so much as to go into the town, where probably there were some expecting him to come back, who had seen Christ lead him out of the town, but, having been eyewitnesses of so many miracles, had not so much as the curiosity to follow him: let not those be gratified with the sight of him when he was cured, who would not show so much respect to Christ as to go a step out of the town, to see this cure wrought. Christ doth not forbid him to tell it to others, but he must not tell it to any in the town. Slighting Christ's favours is forfeiting them; and Christ will make those know the worth of their privileges by the want of them, that would not know them otherwise. Bethsaida, in the day of her visitation, would not know the things that belonged to her peace, and now they are hid from her eyes. They will not see, and therefore shall not see.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

[[no comment]]

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Mark 8:22

(4) And he cometh to Bethsaida; and they bring a blind man unto him, and besought him to touch him.

(4) A true image of our regeneration, which Christ, separating us from the world, works and accomplishes in us gradually.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
Bethsaida:

Mark 6:45 And straightway he constrained his disciples to get into the ship, and to go to the other side before unto Bethsaida, while he sent away the people.
Matthew 11:21 Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works, which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.
Luke 9:10 And the apostles, when they were returned, told him all that they had done. And he took them, and went aside privately into a desert place belonging to the city called Bethsaida.
Luke 10:13 Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon, which have been done in you, they had a great while ago repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.
John 1:44 Now Philip was of Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter.
John 12:21 The same came therefore to Philip, which was of Bethsaida of Galilee, and desired him, saying, Sir, we would see Jesus.

they bring:

Mark 2:3 And they come unto him, bringing one sick of the palsy, which was borne of four.
Mark 6:55-56 And ran through that whole region round about, and began to carry about in beds those that were sick, where they heard he was. ... And whithersoever he entered, into villages, or cities, or country, they laid the sick in the streets, and besought him that they might touch if it were but the border of his garment: and as many as touched him were made whole.

to touch:

Mark 5:27-29 When she had heard of Jesus, came in the press behind, and touched his garment. ... And straightway the fountain of her blood was dried up; and she felt in [her] body that she was healed of that plague.
Matthew 8:3 And Jesus put forth [his] hand, and touched him, saying, I will; be thou clean. And immediately his leprosy was cleansed.
Matthew 8:15 And he touched her hand, and the fever left her: and she arose, and ministered unto them.
Matthew 9:29 Then touched he their eyes, saying, According to your faith be it unto you.
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Mt 8:3, 15; 9:29; 11:21. Mk 2:3; 5:27; 6:45, 55. Lk 9:10; 10:13. Jn 1:44; 12:21.

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