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Mark 8:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— In those days, when there was again a great multitude, and they had nothing to eat, he called unto him his disciples, and saith unto them,
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— In those days the multitude being very great, and having nothing to eat, Jesus called his disciples [unto him], and saith unto them,
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— In those days, when there was again a large crowd and they had nothing to eat, Jesus called His disciples and *said to them,
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— In those days the multitude being very great, and having nothing to eat, Jesus called his disciples, and saith to them,
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— In those days, there being again a great crowd, and they having nothing that they could eat, having called his disciples to [him], he says to them,
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— In those days, there being, again a large multitude, and they not having any thing to eat, calling near the disciples, he saith unto them—
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— In those days the multitude being very great, and not having what they may eat, Jesus having called near his disciples, saith to them,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— In those days again, when there was great multitude and they had nothing to eat; calling his disciples together, he saith to them:
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— In those dayes the multitude being very great, and hauing nothing to eat. Iesus called his disciples vnto him, & saith vnto them,
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— BUT in those days when the multitude was great and there was nothing for them to eat, he called his disciples, and said to them,
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And in those days, when the multitude was great, and had nothing to eat, he called his disciples, and said to them:

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
In 1722
{1722} Prime
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
those 1565
{1565} Prime
ἐκεῖνος
ekeinos
{ek-i'-nos}
From G1563; that one (or [neuter] thing); often intensified by the article prefixed.
days 2250
{2250} Prime
ἡμέρα
hemera
{hay-mer'-ah}
Feminine (with G5610 implied) of a derivative of ἧμαι [[hemai]] (to sit; akin to the base of G1476) meaning tame, that is, gentle; day, that is, (literally) the time space between dawn and dark, or the whole 24 hours (but several days were usually reckoned by the Jews as inclusive of the parts of both extremes); figuratively a period (always defined more or less clearly by the context).
the multitude 3793
{3793} Prime
ὄχλος
ochlos
{okh'-los}
From a derivative of G2192 (meaning a vehicle); a throng (as borne along); by implication the rabble; by extension a class of people; figuratively a riot.
being 5607
{5607} Prime
ὤν
on
{oan}
The feminine, the neuter and the present participle of G1510; being.
z5752
<5752> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 186
very great, 3827
{3827} Prime
πάμπολυς
pampolus
{pam'-pol-ooce}
From G3956 and G4183; full many, that is, immense.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
having 2192
{2192} Prime
ἔχω
echo
{ekh'-o}
A primary verb (including an alternate form σχέω [[scheo]], {skheh'-o}; used in certain tenses only); to hold (used in very various applications, literally or figuratively, direct or remote; such as possession, ability, contiguity, relation or condition).
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
nothing 3361
{3361} Prime
μή
me
{may}
A primary particle of qualified negation (whereas G3756 expresses an absolute denial); (adverbially) not, (conjugationally) lest; also (as interrogitive implying a negative answer [whereas G3756 expects an affirmative one]); whether.
5101
{5101} Prime
τίς
tis
{tis}
Probably emphatic of G5100; an interrogitive pronoun, who, which or what (in direct or indirect questions).
to eat, 5315
{5315} Prime
φάγω
phago
{fag'-o}
A primary verb (used as an alternate of G2068 in certain tenses); to eat (literally or figuratively).
z5632
<5632> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 449
Jesus 2424
{2424} Prime
Ἰησοῦς
Iesous
{ee-ay-sooce'}
Of Hebrew origin [H3091]; Jesus (that is, Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites.
called 4341
{4341} Prime
προσκαλέομαι
proskaleomai
{pros-kal-eh'-om-ahee}
Middle voice from G4314 and G2564; to call toward oneself, that is, summon, invite.
z5666
<5666> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Middle Deponent (See G5788)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 88
his y846
[0846] Standard
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
x848
(0848) Complement
αὑτοῦ
hautou
{how-too'}
Contraction for G1438; self (in some oblique case or reflexive relation).
disciples 3101
{3101} Prime
μαθητής
mathetes
{math-ay-tes'}
From G3129; a learner, that is, pupil.
[unto him], and x2532
(2532) Complement
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
saith 3004
{3004} Prime
λέγω
lego
{leg'-o}
A primary verb; properly to 'lay' forth, that is, (figuratively) relate (in words [usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas G2036 and G5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while G4483 is properly to break silence merely, and G2980 means an extended or random harangue]); by implication to mean.
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
unto them, 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Mark 8:1

_ _ Mark 8:1-26. Four thousand miraculously fed — A sign from heaven sought and refused — The leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees — A blind man at Bethsaida restored to sight. ( = Matthew 15:32-16:12).

_ _ This section of miscellaneous matter evidently follows the preceding one in point of time, as will be seen by observing how it is introduced by Matthew.

_ _ Feeding of the four thousand (Mark 8:1-9).

_ _ In those days the multitude being very great, etc.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Mark 8:1-9

_ _ We had the story of a miracle very like this before, in this gospel (Mark 6:35), and of this same miracle (Matthew 15:32), and here is little or no addition or alternation as to the circumstances. Yet observe,

_ _ 1. That our Lord Jesus was greatly followed; The multitude was very great (Mark 8:1); notwithstanding the wicked arts of the scribes and Pharisees to blemish him, and to blast his interest, the common people, who had more honesty, and therefore more true wisdom, than their leaders, kept up their high thoughts of him. We may suppose that this multitude were generally of the meaner sort of people, with such Christ conversed, and was familiar; for thus he humbled himself, and made himself of no reputation, and thus encouraged the meanest to come to him for life and grace.

_ _ 2. Those that followed him, underwent a great deal of difficulty in following him; They were with him three days, and had nothing to eat, that was hard service. Never let the Pharisee say, that Christ's disciples fast not. There were those, probably, that brought some food with them from home; but by this time it was all spent, and they had a great way home; and yet they continued with Christ, and did not speak of leaving him till he spoke of dismissing them. Note, True zeal makes nothing of hardships in the way of duty. They that have a full feast for their souls may be content with slender provision for their bodies. It was an old saying among the Puritans, Grown bread and the gospel are good fare.

_ _ 3. As Christ has a compassion for all that are in wants and straits, so he has a special concern for those that are reduced to straits by their zeal and diligence in attending on him. Christ said, I have compassion on the multitude. Whom the proud Pharisees looked upon with disdain, the humble Jesus looked upon with pity and tenderness; and thus must we honour all men. But that which he chiefly considers, is, They have been with me three days, and have nothing to eat. Whatever losses we sustain, or hardships we go through, for Christ's sake, and in love to him, he will take care that they shall be made up to us one way or other. They that seek the Lord, shall not long want any good thing, Psalms 34:10. Observe with what sympathy Christ saith (Mark 8:3), If I send them away fasting to their own houses, they will faint by the way, for hunger. Christ knows and considers our frame; and he is for the body, if we glorify him, verily we shall be fed. He considered that many of them came from afar, and had a great way home. When we see multitudes attending upon the word preached, it is comfortable to think that Christ knows whence they all come, though we do not. I know thy works, and where thou dwellest, Revelation 2:13. Christ would by no means have them go home fasting, for it is not his manner to send those empty way from him, that in a right manner attend on him.

_ _ 4. The doubts of Christians are sometimes made to work for the magnifying of the power of Christ. The disciples could not imagine whence so many men should be satisfied with bread here in the wilderness, Mark 8:4. That therefore must needs be wonderful, and appear so much the more so, which the disciples looked upon as impossible.

_ _ 5. Christ's time to act for the relief of his people, is, when things are brought to the last extremity; when they were ready to faint, Christ provided for them. That he might not invite them to follow him for the loaves, he did not supply them but when they were utterly reduced, and then he sent them away.

_ _ 6. The bounty of Christ is inexhaustible, and, to evidence that, Christ repeated this miracle, to show that he is still the same for the succour and supply of his people that attend upon him. His favours are renewed, as our wants and necessities are. In the former miracle, Christ used all the bread he had, which was five loaves, and fed all the guests he had, which were five thousand, and so he did now; though he might have said, “If five loaves would feed five thousand, four may feed four thousand;” he took all the seven loaves, and fed with them the four thousand; for he would teach us to take things as they are, and accommodate ourselves to them; to use what we have, and make the best of that which is. Here it was, as in the dispensing of manna, He that gathered much had nothing over, and he that gathered little had no lack.

_ _ 7. In our Father's house, in our Master's house, there is bread enough, and to spare; there is a fulness in Christ, which he communicates to all that passes through his hands; so that from it we receive, and grace for grace, John 1:16. Those need not fear wanting, that have Christ to live upon.

_ _ 8. It is good for those that follow Christ, to keep together; these followers of Christ continued in a body, four thousand of them together, and Christ fed them all. Christ's sheep must abide by the flock, and go forth by their footsteps, and verily they shall be fed.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Mark 8:1

Matthew 15:32.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

[[no comment]]

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance

Matthew 15:32-39 Then Jesus called his disciples [unto him], and said, I have compassion on the multitude, because they continue with me now three days, and have nothing to eat: and I will not send them away fasting, lest they faint in the way. ... And he sent away the multitude, and took ship, and came into the coasts of Magdala.
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Mt 15:32.

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