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Mark 7:31 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And again he went out from the borders of Tyre, and came through Sidon unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the borders of Decapolis.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Again He went out from the region of Tyre, and came through Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, within the region of Decapolis.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And again, departing from the borders of Tyre and Sidon, he came to the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the borders of Decapolis.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And again having left the borders of Tyre and Sidon, he came to the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And, again coming forth out of the bounds of Tyre, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the bounds of Decapolis.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And again, having gone forth from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And again going out of the coasts of Tyre, he came by Sidon to the sea of Galilee, through the midst the of the coasts of Decapolis.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And againe departing from the coastes of Tyre and Sidon, he came vnto the sea of Galilee, thorow the midst of the coasts of Decapolis.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— Jeshu again departed from the confine of Tsur and of Tsaidon, and came to the sea of Galila, on the confine of the Ten Cities;
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— Again Jesus departed from the border of Tyre and Sidon, and came to the sea of Galilee, to the border of Decapolis.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
again, 3825
{3825} Prime
πάλιν
palin
{pal'-in}
Probably from the same as G3823 (through the idea of oscillatory repetition); (adverbially) anew, that is, (of place) back, (of time) once more, or (conjugationally) furthermore or on the other hand.
departing 1831
{1831} Prime
ἐξέρχομαι
exerchomai
{ex-er'-khom-ahee}
From G1537 and G2064; to issue (literally or figuratively).
z5631
<5631> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 889
from 1537
{1537} Prime
ἐκ
ek
{ek}
A primary preposition denoting origin (the point whence motion or action proceeds), from, out (of place, time or cause; literally or figuratively; direct or remote).
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
coasts 3725
{3725} Prime
ὅριον
horion
{hor'-ee-on}
Neuter of a derivative of an apparently primary word ὅρος [[horos]] (a bound or limit); a boundary line, that is, (by implication) a frontier (region).
of Tyre 5184
{5184} Prime
Τύρος
Turos
{too'-ros}
Of Hebrew origin [H6865]; Tyrus (that is, Tsor), a place in Palestine.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
Sidon, 4605
{4605} Prime
Σιδών
Sidon
{sid-one'}
Of Hebrew origin [H6721]; Sidon (that is, Tsidon), a place in Palestine.
he came 2064
{2064} Prime
ἔρχομαι
erchomai
{er'-khom-ahee}
Middle voice of a primary verb (used only in the present and imperfect tenses, the others being supplied by a kindred [middle voice] word, ἐλεύθομαι [[eleuthomai]], {el-yoo'-thom-ahee}; or [active] ἔλθω [[eltho]], {el'-tho}; which do not otherwise occur); to come or go (in a great variety of applications, literally and figuratively).
z5627
<5627> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2138 plus 1 in a variant reading in a footnote
unto 4314
{4314} Prime
πρός
pros
{pros}
A strengthened form of G4253; a preposition of direction; forward to, that is, toward (with the genitive case the side of, that is, pertaining to; with the dative case by the side of, that is, near to; usually with the accusative case the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, that is, whither or for which it is predicated).
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
sea 2281
{2281} Prime
θάλασσα
thalassa
{thal'-as-sah}
Probably prolonged from G0251; the sea (generally or specifically).
of Galilee, 1056
{1056} Prime
Γαλιλαία
Galilaia
{gal-il-ah'-yah}
Of hebrew origin [H1551]; Galilaea (that is, the heathen circle), a region of Palestine.
through 303
{0303} Prime
ἀνά
ana
{an-ah'}
A primary preposition and adverb; properly up; but (by extension) used (distributively) severally, or (locally) at (etc.).
the midst 3319
{3319} Prime
μέσος
mesos
{mes'-os}
From G3326; middle (as adjective or [neuter] noun).
of the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
coasts 3725
{3725} Prime
ὅριον
horion
{hor'-ee-on}
Neuter of a derivative of an apparently primary word ὅρος [[horos]] (a bound or limit); a boundary line, that is, (by implication) a frontier (region).
of Decapolis. 1179
{1179} Prime
Δεκάπολις
Dekapolis
{dek-ap'-ol-is}
From G1176 and G4172; the ten city region; the Decapolis, a district in Syria.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Mark 7:31

_ _ Mark 7:31-37. Deaf and dumb man healed.

_ _ And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the Sea of Galilee — or, according to what has very strong claims to be regarded as the true text here, “And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre, He came through Sidon to the Sea of Galilee.” The manuscripts in favor of this reading, though not the most numerous, are weighty, while the versions agreeing with it are among the most ancient; and all the best critical editors and commentators adopt it. In this case we must understand that our Lord, having once gone out of the Holy Land the length of Tyre, proceeded as far north as Sidon, though without ministering, so far as appears, in those parts, and then bent His steps in a southeasterly direction. There is certainly a difficulty in the supposition of so long a detour without any missionary object: and some may think this sufficient to cast the balance in favor of the received reading. Be this as it may, on returning from these coasts of Tyre, He passed

_ _ through the midst of the coasts — frontiers.

_ _ of Decapolis — crossing the Jordan, therefore, and approaching the lake on its east side. Here Matthew, who omits the details of the cure of this deaf and dumb man, introduces some particulars, from which we learn that it was only one of a great number. “And Jesus,” says that Evangelist (Matthew 15:29-31), “departed from thence, and came nigh unto the Sea of Galilee, and went up into a mountain” — the mountain range bounding the lake on the northeast, in Decapolis: “And great multitudes came unto Him, having with them lame, blind, dumb, maimed” — not “mutilated,” which is but a secondary sense of the word, but “deformed” — “and many others, and cast them down at Jesus’ feet; and He healed them: insomuch that the multitude [multitudes] wondered, when they saw the dumb to speak, the maimed to be whole, the lame to walk, and the blind to see; and they glorified the God of Israel” — who after so long and dreary an absence of visible manifestation, had returned to bless His people as of old (compare Luke 7:16). Beyond this it is not clear from the Evangelist’s language that the people saw into the claims of Jesus. Well, of these cases Mark here singles out one, whose cure had something peculiar in it.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Mark 7:31-37

_ _ Our Lord Jesus seldom staid long in a place, for he knew where his work lay, and attended the changes of it. When he had cured the woman of Canaan's daughter, he had done what he had to do in that place, and therefore presently left those parts, and returned to the sea of Galilee, whereabout his usual residence was; yet he did not come directly thither, but fetched a compass through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis, which lay mostly on the other side Jordan; such long walks did our Lord Jesus take, when he went about doing good.

_ _ Now here we have the story of a cure that Christ wrought, which is not recorded by any other of the evangelists; it is of one that was deaf and dumb.

_ _ I. His case was sad, Mark 7:32. There were those that brought to him one that was deaf; some think, born deaf, and then he must be dumb of course; others think that by some distemper or disaster he was become deaf, or, at least, thick of hearing; and he had an impediment in his speech. He was mogilalos; some think that he was quite dumb; others, that he could not speak but with great difficulty to himself, and so as scarcely to be understood by those that heard him. He was tongue-tied, so that he was perfectly unfit for conversation, and deprived both of the pleasure and of the profit of it; he had not the satisfaction either of hearing other people talk, or of telling his own mind. Let us take occasion from hence to give thanks to God for preserving to us the sense of hearing, especially that we may be capable of hearing the word of God; and the faculty of speech, especially that we may be capable of speaking God's praises; and let us look with compassion upon those that are deaf or dumb, and treat them with great tenderness. They that brought this poor man to Christ, besought him that he would put his hand upon him, as the prophets did upon those whom they blessed in the name of the Lord. It is not said, They besought him to cure him, but to put his hand upon him, to take cognizance of his case, and put forth his power to do to him as he pleased.

_ _ II. His cure was solemn, and some of the circumstances of it were singular.

_ _ 1. Christ took him aside from the multitude, Mark 7:33. Ordinarily, he wrought his miracles publicly before all the people, to show that they would bear the strictest scrutiny and inspection; but this he did privately, to show that he did not seek his own glory, and to teach us to avoid every thing that savours of ostentation. Let us learn of Christ to be humble, and to do good where no eye sees, but his that is all eye.

_ _ 2. He used more significant actions, in the doing of this cure, than usual. (1.) He put his fingers into his ears, as if he would syringe them, and fetch out that which stopped them up. (2.) He spit upon his own finger, and then touched his tongue, as if he would moisten his mouth, and so loosen that with which his tongue was tied; these were no causes that could in the least contribute to his cure, but only signs of the exerting of that power which Christ had in himself to cure him, for the encouraging of his faith, and theirs that brought him. The application was all from himself, it was his own fingers that he put into his ears, and his own spittle that he put upon his tongue; for he alone heals.

_ _ 3. He looked up to heaven, to give his Father the praise of what he did; for he sought his praise, and did his will, and, as Mediator, acted in dependence on him, and with an eye to him. Thus he signified that it was by a divine power, a power her had as the Lord from heaven, and brought with him thence, that he did this; for the hearing ear and the seeing eye the Lord has made, and can remake even both of them. He also hereby directed his patient who could see, though he could not hear, to look up to heaven for relief. Moses with his stammering tongue is directed to look that way (Exodus 4:11); Who hath made man's mouth? Or who maketh the dumb or deaf, or the seeing or the blind? Have not I the Lord?

_ _ 4. He sighed; not as if he found any difficulty in working this miracle, or obtaining power to do it from his father; but thus he expressed his pity for the miseries of human life, and his sympathy with the afflicted in their afflictions, as one that was himself touched with the feeling of their infirmities. And as to this man, he sighed, not because he was loth to do him this kindness, or did it with reluctancy; but because of the many temptations which he would be exposed to, and the sins he would be in danger of, the tongue-sins, after the restoring of his speech to him, which before he was free from. He had better be tongue-tied still, unless he have grace to keep his mouth as with a bridle, Psalms 39:1.

_ _ 5. He said, Ephphatha; that is, Be opened. This was nothing that looked like spell or charm, such as they used, who had familiar spirits, who peeped and muttered, Isaiah 8:19. Christ speaks as one having authority, and power went along with the word. Be opened, served both parts of the cure; “Let the ears be opened, let the lips be opened, let him hear and speak freely, and let the restraint be taken off;” and the effect was answerable (Mark 7:35); Straightway his ears were opened, and the string of his tongue was loosed, and all was well: and happy he who, as soon as he had his hearing and speech, had the blessed Jesus so near him to converse with.

_ _ Now this cure was, (1.) A proof of Christ's being the Messiah; for it was foretold that by his power the ears of the deaf should be unstopped, and the tongue of the dumb should be made to sing, Isaiah 35:5, Isaiah 35:6. (2.) It was a specimen of the operations of his gospel upon the minds of men. The great command of the gospel, and grace of Christ to poor sinners, is Ephphatha — Be opened. Grotius applies it thus, that the internal impediments of the mind are removed by the Spirit of Christ, as those bodily impediments were by the word of his power. He opens the heart, as he did Lydia's, and thereby opens the ear to receive the word of God, and opens the mouth in prayer and praises.

_ _ 6. He ordered it to be kept very private, but it was made very public (1.) It was his humility, that he charged them they should tell no man, Mark 7:36. Most men will proclaim their own goodness, or, at least, desire that others should proclaim it; but Christ, though he was himself in no danger of being puffed up with it, knowing that we are, would thus set us an example of self-denial, as in other things, so especially in praise and applause. We should take pleasure in doing good, but not in its being known. (2.) It was their zeal, that, though he charged them to say nothing of it, yet they published it, before Christ would have had it published. But they meant honestly, and therefore it is to be reckoned rather an act of indiscretion than an act of disobedience, Mark 7:36. But they that told it, and they that heard it, were beyond measure astonished, huperperisssmore than above measure; they were exceedingly affected with it, and this was said by every body, it was the common verdict, He hath done all things well (Mark 7:37); whereas there were those that hated and persecuted him as an evil-doer, they are ready to witness for him, not only that he has done no evil, but that he has done a great deal of good, and has done it well, modestly and humbly, and very devoutly, and all gratis, without money and without price, which added much to the lustre of his good works. He maketh both the deaf to hear, and the dumb to speak; and that is well, it is well for them, it is well for their relations, to whom they had been a burthen; and therefore they are inexcusable who speak ill of him.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Mark 7:31

Matthew 15:29.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Mark 7:31

(7) And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of (q) Decapolis.

(7) As the Father created us to this life in the beginning in his only son, so does he also in him alone renew us into everlasting life.

(q) It was a little country, and it was so called because it consisted of ten cities under the jurisdiction of four surrounding governments; Pliny, book 3, chap. 8.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
from:

Mark 7:24 And from thence he arose, and went into the borders of Tyre and Sidon, and entered into an house, and would have no man know [it]: but he could not be hid.
Matthew 15:29-31 And Jesus departed from thence, and came nigh unto the sea of Galilee; and went up into a mountain, and sat down there. ... Insomuch that the multitude wondered, when they saw the dumb to speak, the maimed to be whole, the lame to walk, and the blind to see: and they glorified the God of Israel.

Decapolis:

Mark 5:20 And he departed, and began to publish in Decapolis how great things Jesus had done for him: and all [men] did marvel.
Matthew 4:25 And there followed him great multitudes of people from Galilee, and [from] Decapolis, and [from] Jerusalem, and [from] Judaea, and [from] beyond Jordan.
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Mt 4:25; 15:29. Mk 5:20; 7:24.

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