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Mark 6:45 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And straightway he constrained his disciples to enter into the boat, and to go before [him] unto the other side to Bethsaida, while he himself sendeth the multitude away.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And straightway he constrained his disciples to get into the ship, and to go to the other side before unto Bethsaida, while he sent away the people.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Immediately Jesus made His disciples get into the boat and go ahead of [Him] to the other side to Bethsaida, while He Himself was sending the crowd away.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And immediately he constrained his disciples to get into the boat, and to go to the other side before to Bethsaida, while he sent away the people.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And immediately he compelled his disciples to go on board ship, and to go on before to the other side to Bethsaida, while *he* sends the crowd away.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And, straightway, constrained he his disciples to enter into the boat, and be going forward to the other side, unto Bethsaida,—while, he, was dismissing the multitude.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And immediately he constrained his disciples to go into the boat, and to go before to the other side, unto Bethsaida, till he may let the multitude away,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And immediately he obliged his disciples to go up into the ship, that they might go before him over the water to Bethsaida, whilst he dismissed the people.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And straightway he constrained his disciples to get into the ship, and to goe to the other side before vnto Bethsaida, while he sent away the people.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And immediately he constrained his disciples to ascend into the bark, and to go before him across to Beth-tsaida, while he dismissed the assemblies;
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And he immediately constrained his disciples to take ship, and go before him to the other side, to Bethsaida, while he dismissed the multitudes.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
straightway 2112
{2112} Prime
εὐθέως
eutheos
{yoo-theh'-oce}
Adverb from G2117; directly, that is, at once or soon.
he constrained 315
{0315} Prime
ἀναγκάζω
anagkazo
{an-ang-kad'-zo}
From G0318; to necessitate.
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
his y846
[0846] Standard
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
x848
(0848) Complement
αὑτοῦ
hautou
{how-too'}
Contraction for G1438; self (in some oblique case or reflexive relation).
disciples 3101
{3101} Prime
μαθητής
mathetes
{math-ay-tes'}
From G3129; a learner, that is, pupil.
to get 1684
{1684} Prime
ἐμβαίνω
embaino
{em-ba'-hee-no}
From G1722 and the base of G0939; to walk on, that is, embark (aboard a vessel), reach (a pool).
z5629
<5629> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 454
into 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
ship, 4143
{4143} Prime
πλοῖον
ploion
{ploy'-on}
From G4126; a sailer, that is, vessel.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
to go y4254
[4254] Standard
προάγω
proago
{pro-ag'-o}
From G4253 and G0071; to lead forward (magisterially); intransitively to precede (in place or time [participle previous]).
z0
<0000> Grammar
The original word in the Greek or Hebrew is translated by more than one word in the English. The English translation is separated by one or more other words from the original.
to y1519
[1519] Standard
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
the other side 4008
{4008} Prime
πέραν
peran
{per'-an}
Apparently the accusative case of an obsolete derivation of πείρω [[peiro]] (to 'pierce'); through (as adverb or preposition), that is, across.
x4254
(4254) Complement
προάγω
proago
{pro-ag'-o}
From G4253 and G0071; to lead forward (magisterially); intransitively to precede (in place or time [participle previous]).
x1519
(1519) Complement
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
before y4254
[4254] Standard
προάγω
proago
{pro-ag'-o}
From G4253 and G0071; to lead forward (magisterially); intransitively to precede (in place or time [participle previous]).
z5721
<5721> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 647
x4314
(4314) Complement
πρός
pros
{pros}
A strengthened form of G4253; a preposition of direction; forward to, that is, toward (with the genitive case the side of, that is, pertaining to; with the dative case by the side of, that is, near to; usually with the accusative case the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, that is, whither or for which it is predicated).
unto y4314
[4314] Standard
πρός
pros
{pros}
A strengthened form of G4253; a preposition of direction; forward to, that is, toward (with the genitive case the side of, that is, pertaining to; with the dative case by the side of, that is, near to; usually with the accusative case the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, that is, whither or for which it is predicated).
Bethsaida, 966
{0966} Prime
Βηθσαϊδά[ν]
Bethsaida
{bayth-sahee-dah'}
Of Chaldee origin (compare [H1004] and [H6719]); fishing house; Bethsaida, a place in Palestine.
while 2193
{2193} Prime
ἕως
heos
{heh'-oce}
Of uncertain affinity; a conjugation, preposition and adverb of continuance, until (of time and place).
he 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
sent away 630
{0630} Prime
ἀπολύω
apoluo
{ap-ol-oo'-o}
From G0575 and G3089; to free fully, that is, (literally) relieve, release, dismiss (reflexively depart), or (figuratively) let die, pardon, or (specifically) divorce.
z5661
<5661> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 512
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
people. 3793
{3793} Prime
ὄχλος
ochlos
{okh'-los}
From a derivative of G2192 (meaning a vehicle); a throng (as borne along); by implication the rabble; by extension a class of people; figuratively a riot.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Mark 6:45

_ _ Mark 6:45-56. Jesus recrosses to the western side of the lake walking on the sea.

_ _ One very important particular given by John alone (John 6:15) introduces this portion: “When Jesus therefore perceived that they would take Him by force, to make Him a king, He departed again into a mountain Himself alone.”

_ _ And straightway he constrained his disciples to get into the ship, and to go to the other side before — Him.

_ _ unto Bethsaida — Bethsaida of Galilee (John 12:21). John (John 6:17) says they “went over the sea towards Capernaum” — the wind, probably, occasioning this slight deviation from the direction of Bethsaida.

_ _ while he sent away the people — “the multitude.” His object in this was to put an end to the misdirected excitement in His favor (John 6:15), into which the disciples themselves may have been somewhat drawn. The word “constrained” implies reluctance on their part, perhaps from unwillingness to part with their Master and embark at night, leaving Him alone on the mountain.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Mark 6:45-56

_ _ This passage of story we had Matthew 14:22, etc., only what was there related concerning Peter, is omitted here. Here we have,

_ _ I. The dispersing of the assembly; Christ constrained his disciples to go before by ship to Bethsaida, intending to follow them, as they supposed, by land. The people were loth to scatter, so that it cost him some time and pains to send them away. For now that they had got a good supper, they were in no haste to leave him. But as long as we are here in this world, we have no continuing city, no not in communion with Christ. The everlasting feast is reserved for the future state.

_ _ II. Christ departed into a mountain, to pray. Observe, 1. He prayed; though he had so much preaching-work upon his hands, yet he was much in prayer; he prayed often, and prayed long, which is an encouragement to us to depend upon the intercession he is making for us at the right hand of the Father, that continual intercession. 2. He went alone, to pray; though he needed not to retire for the avoiding either of distraction or of ostentation, yet, to set us an example, and to encourage us in our secret addresses to God, he prayed alone, and, for want of a closet, went up into a mountain, to pray. A good man is never less alone than when alone with God.

_ _ III. The disciples were in distress at sea; The wind was contrary (Mark 6:48), so that they toiled in rowing, and could not get forward. This was a specimen of the hardships they were to expect, when hereafter he should send them abroad to preach the gospel; it would be like sending them to sea at this time with the wind in their teeth: they must expect to toil in rowing, they must work hard to strive against so strong a stream; they must likewise expect to be tossed with waves, to be persecuted by their enemies; and by exposing them now he intended to train them up for such difficulties, that they might learn to endure hardness. The church is often like a ship at sea, tossed with tempests, and not comforted we may have Christ for us, and yet wind and tide against us; but it is a comfort to Christ's disciples in a storm, that their Master is in the heavenly mount, interceding for them.

_ _ IV. Christ made them a kind visit upon the water. He could have checked the winds, where he was, or have sent an angel to their relief; but he chose to help them in the most endearing manner possible, and therefore came to them himself.

_ _ 1. He did not come till the fourth watch of the night, not till after three o'clock in the morning; but then he came. Note, If Christ's visits to his people be deferred long, yet at length he will come; and their extremity is his opportunity to appear for them so much the more seasonably. Though the salvation tarry, yet we must wait for it; at the end it shall speak, in the fourth watch of the night, and not lie.

_ _ 2. He came, walking upon the waters. The sea was now tossed with waves, and yet Christ came, walking upon it; for though the floods lift up their voice, the Lord on high is mightier, Psalms 93:3, Psalms 93:4. No difficulties can obstruct Christ's gracious appearances for his people, when the set time is come. He will either find, or force, a way through the most tempestuous sea, for their deliverance, Psalms 42:7, Psalms 42:8,

_ _ 3. He would have passed by them, that is, he set his face and steered his course, as if he would have gone further, and took no notice of them; this he did, to awaken them to call to him. Note, Providence, when it is acting designedly and directly for the succour of God's people, yet sometimes seems as if it were giving them the go-by, and regarded not their case. They thought that he would, but we may be sure that he would not, have passed by them.

_ _ 4. They were frightened at the sight of him, supposing him to have been an apparition; They all saw him, and were troubled (Mark 6:50), thinking it had been some daemon, or evil genius, that haunted them, and raised this storm. We often perplex and frighten ourselves with phantasms, the creatures of our own fancy and imagination.

_ _ 5. He encouraged them, and silenced their fears, by making himself known to them; he talked familiarly with them, saying, Be of good cheer, it is I; be not afraid. Note, (1.) We know not Christ till he is pleased to reveal himself to us. “It is I; I your Master, I your friend, I your Redeemer and Saviour. It is I, that came to a troublesome earth, and now to a tempestuous sea, to look after you.” (2.) The knowledge of Christ, as he is in himself, and near to us, is enough to make the disciples of Christ cheerful even in a storm, and no longer fearful. If it be so, why am I thus? If it is Christ that is with thee, be of good cheer, be not afraid. Our fears are soon satisfied, if our mistakes be but rectified, especially our mistakes concerning Christ. See Genesis 21:19; 2 Kings 6:15-17. Christ's presence with us in a stormy day, is enough to make us of good cheer, though clouds and darkness be round about us. He said, It is I. He doth not tell them who he was (there was no occasion), they knew his voice, as the sheep know the voice of their own shepherd, John 10:4. How readily doth the spouse say, once and again, It is the voice of my beloved! Song of Songs 2:8; Song of Songs 5:2. He said, eg eimiI am he; or I am; it is God's name, when he comes to deliver Israel, Exodus 3:14. So it is Christ's, now that he comes to deliver his disciples. When Christ said to those that came to apprehend him by force, I am he, they were struck down by it, John 18:6. When he saith to those that come to apprehend him by faith, I am he, they are raised up by it, and comforted.

_ _ 6. He went up to them into the ship, embarked in the same bottom with them, and so made them perfectly easy. Let them but have their Master with them, and all is well. And as soon as he was come into the ship, the wind ceased. In the former storm that they were in, it is said, He arose, and rebuked the winds, and said to the sea, Peace, be still (Mark 4:39); but here we read of no such formal command given, only the wind ceased all of a sudden. note, Our Lord Jesus will be sure to do his own work always effectually, though not always alike solemnly, and with observation. Though we hear not the command given, yet, if thus the wind cease, and we have the comfort of a calm, say, It is because Christ is in the ship, and his decree is gone forth or ever we are aware, Song of Songs 6:12. When we come with Christ to heaven, the wind ceaseth presently; there are no storms in the upper region.

_ _ 7. They were more surprised and astonished at this miracle than did become them, and there was that at the bottom of their astonishment, which was really culpable; They were sore amazed in themselves, were in a perfect ecstasy; as if it were a new and unaccountable thing, as if Christ had never done the like before, and they had no reason to expect he should do it now; they ought to admire the power of Christ, and to be confirmed hereby in their belief of his being the Son of God: but why all this confusion about it? It was because they considered not the miracle of the loaves; had they given that its due weight, they would not have been so much surprised at this; for his multiplying the bread was as great an instance of his power as his walking on the water. They were strangely stupid and unthinking, and their heart was hardened, or else they would not have thought it a thing incredible that Christ should command a calm. It is for want of a right understanding of Christ's former works, that we are transported at the thought of his present works, as if there never were the like before.

_ _ V. When they came to the land of Gennesaret, which lay between Bethsaida and Capernaum, the people bid them very welcome; The men of that place presently knew Jesus (Mark 6:54), and knew what mighty works he did wherever he came, what a universal Healer he was; they knew likewise that he used to stay but a little while at a place, and therefore they were concerned to improve the opportunity of this kind visit which he made them; They ran through that whole region round about, with all possible expedition, and began to carry about in beds those that were sick, and not able to go themselves; there was no danger of their getting cold when they hoped to get a cure, Mark 6:55. Let him go where he would, he was crowded with patients — in towns, in the cities, in the villages about the cities; they laid the sick in the streets, to be in his way, and begged leave for them to touch if it were but the border of his garment, as the woman with the bloody issue did, by whom, it should seem, this method of application was first brought in; and as many as touched, were made whole. We do not find that they were desirous to be taught by him, only to be healed. If ministers could not cure people's bodily diseases, what multitudes would attend them! But it is sad to think how much more concerned the most of men are about their bodies than about their souls.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Mark 6:45

He constrained his disciples — Who did not care to go without him. Matthew 14:22.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Mark 6:45

(7) And straightway he constrained his disciples to get into the ship, and to go to the other side before unto Bethsaida, while he sent away the people.

(7) The faithful servants of God after their little labour are subject to a great tempest which Christ, being present in power although absent in body, moderates in such a way that he brings them to a happy haven, at such time and by such means as they did not expect: A graphic image of the Church tossed to and fro in this world.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
straightway:

Matthew 14:22-33 And straightway Jesus constrained his disciples to get into a ship, and to go before him unto the other side, while he sent the multitudes away. ... Then they that were in the ship came and worshipped him, saying, Of a truth thou art the Son of God.
John 6:15-17 When Jesus therefore perceived that they would come and take him by force, to make him a king, he departed again into a mountain himself alone. ... And entered into a ship, and went over the sea toward Capernaum. And it was now dark, and Jesus was not come to them.
John 6:18-21 And the sea arose by reason of a great wind that blew. ... Then they willingly received him into the ship: and immediately the ship was at the land whither they went.

unto Bethsaida:
or, over against Bethsaida, Bethsaida, according to Josephus, was situated on the sea of Gennesaret, in the lower Gaulonitis (consequently on the east of the lake, as Pliny states), and at the beginning of the mountainous country; and it was raised from a village to the honour of a city by Philip, and called Julias in honour of the emperor's daughter. Some learned men, however, are of opinion that the Bethsaida mentioned in the gospels was a different place; and that it was situated on the western shore of the sea of Tiberias, in Galilee, near Chorazin and Capernaum, with which it is associated (
Matthew 11:21 Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works, which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.
Matthew 11:23 And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.
John 12:21 The same came therefore to Philip, which was of Bethsaida of Galilee, and desired him, saying, Sir, we would see Jesus.
); and Bishop Pococke mentions the ruins of a town or large village in the plain of Huttin, about two miles west of the lake, still bearing the name of Baitsida, which he thinks occupies its site.
Mark 8:22 And he cometh to Bethsaida; and they bring a blind man unto him, and besought him to touch him.
Luke 10:13 Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon, which have been done in you, they had a great while ago repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.
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Mt 11:21, 23; 14:22. Mk 8:22. Lk 10:13. Jn 6:15, 18; 12:21.

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