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Mark 14:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Now after two days was [the feast of] the passover and the unleavened bread: and the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might take him with subtlety, and kill him:
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— After two days was [the feast of] the passover, and of unleavened bread: and the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might take him by craft, and put [him] to death.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Now the Passover and Unleavened Bread were two days away; and the chief priests and the scribes were seeking how to seize Him by stealth and kill [Him];
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— After two days was [the feast of] the passover, and of unleavened bread: and the chief priests, and the scribes, sought how they might take him by craft, and put [him] to death.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Now the passover and the [feast of] unleavened bread was after two days. And the chief priests and the scribes were seeking how they might seize him by subtlety and kill him.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Now it was the Passover and the Unleavened [cakes], after two days. And the High-priests and Scribes were seeking, how, with guile, they might secure, and lay him;
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And the passover and the unleavened food were after two days, and the chief priests and the scribes were seeking how, by guile, having taken hold of him, they might kill him;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Now the feast of the pasch and of the Azymes was after two days: and the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might by some wile lay hold on him and kill him.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— After two dayes was [the feast of] the Passeouer, and of vnleauened bread: and the chiefe Priests, and the Scribes sought how they might take him by craft, and put him to death.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— BUT after two days was the Petscha of unleavened cakes: and the chief priests and the Sophree sought how with guile they might apprehend and kill him.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And after two days, was the passover of unleavened cakes. And the chief priests and the Scribes sought how they might take him by stratagem, and kill him.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
After y1161
[1161] Standard
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
x3326
(3326) Complement
μετά
meta
{met-ah'}
A primary preposition (often used adverbially); properly denoting accompaniment; 'amid' (local or causal); modified variously according to the case (genitive case association, or accusative case succession) with which it is joined; occupying an intermediate position between G0575 or G1537 and G1519 or G4314; less intimate than G1722, and less close than G4862).
two 1417
{1417} Prime
δύο
duo
{doo'-o}
A primary numeral; 'two'.
days 2250
{2250} Prime
ἡμέρα
hemera
{hay-mer'-ah}
Feminine (with G5610 implied) of a derivative of ἧμαι [[hemai]] (to sit; akin to the base of G1476) meaning tame, that is, gentle; day, that is, (literally) the time space between dawn and dark, or the whole 24 hours (but several days were usually reckoned by the Jews as inclusive of the parts of both extremes); figuratively a period (always defined more or less clearly by the context).
was 2258
{2258} Prime
ἦν
en
{ane}
Imperfect of G1510; I (thou, etc.) was (wast or were).
z5713
<5713> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 532
[the feast of] the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
passover, 3957
{3957} Prime
πάσχα
pascha
{pas'-khah}
Of Chaldee origin (compare [H6453]); the Passover (the meal, the day, the festival or the special sacrifices connected with it).
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
of y3326
[3326] Standard
μετά
meta
{met-ah'}
A primary preposition (often used adverbially); properly denoting accompaniment; 'amid' (local or causal); modified variously according to the case (genitive case association, or accusative case succession) with which it is joined; occupying an intermediate position between G0575 or G1537 and G1519 or G4314; less intimate than G1722, and less close than G4862).
unleavened bread: 106
{0106} Prime
ἄζυμος
azumos
{ad'-zoo-mos}
From G0001 (as a negative particle) and G2219; unleavened, that is, (figuratively) uncorrupted; (in the neuter plural) specifically (by implication) the Passover week.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
chief priests 749
{0749} Prime
ἀρχιερεύς
archiereus
{ar-khee-er-yuce'}
From G0746 and G2409; the high priest (literally of the Jews, typically Christ); by extension a chief priest.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
scribes 1122
{1122} Prime
γραμματεύς
grammateus
{gram-mat-yooce'}
From G1121; a writer, that is, (professionally) scribe or secretary.
sought 2212
{2212} Prime
ζητέω
zeteo
{dzay-teh'-o}
Of uncertain affinity; to seek (literally or figuratively); specifically (by Hebraism) to worship (God), or (in a bad sense) to plot (against life).
z5707
<5707> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 855
how 4459
{4459} Prime
πῶς
pos
{poce}
Adverb from the base of G4226; an interrogitive particle of manner; in what way? (sometimes the question is indirect, how?); also as exclamation, how much!.
they might take 2902
{2902} Prime
κρατέω
krateo
{krat-eh'-o}
From G2904; to use strength, that is, seize or retain (literally or figuratively).
z5660
<5660> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 714
him 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
by 1722
{1722} Prime
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
craft, 1388
{1388} Prime
δόλος
dolos
{dol'-os}
From δέλλω [[dello]] (an obsolete primary probably meaning to decoy; compare G1185); a trick (bait), that is, (figuratively) wile.
and put [him] to death. 615
{0615} Prime
ἀποκτείνω
apokteino
{ap-ok-ti'-no}
From G0575 and κτείνω [[kteino]] (to slay); to kill outright; figuratively to destroy.
z5725
<5725> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 352
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Mark 14:1

_ _ Mark 14:1-11. The conspiracy of the Jewish authorities to put Jesus to death — The supper and the anointing at Bethany — Judas agrees with the chief priests to betray his Lord. ( = Matthew 26:1-16; Luke 22:1-6; John 12:1-11).

_ _ The events of this section appeared to have occurred on the fourth day (Wednesday) of the Redeemer’s Last Week.

_ _ Conspiracy of the Jewish authorities to put Jesus to death (Mark 14:1, Mark 14:2).

_ _ After two days was the feast of the passover, and of unleavened bread — The meaning is, that two days after what is about to be mentioned the passover would arrive; in other words, what follows occurred two days before the feast.

_ _ and the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might take him by craft, and put him to death — From Matthew’s fuller account (Matthew 26:1-75) we learn that our Lord announced this to the Twelve as follows, being the first announcement to them of the precise time: “And it came to pass, when Jesus had finished all these sayings” (Matthew 26:1) — referring to the contents of Matthew 24:1-25:46, which He delivered to His disciples; His public ministry being now closed: from His prophetical He is now passing into His priestly office, although all along He Himself took our infirmities and bare our sicknesses — “He said unto His disciples, Ye know that after two days is [the feast of] the passover, and the Son of man is betrayed to be crucified.” The first and the last steps of His final sufferings are brought together in this brief announcement of all that was to take place. The passover was the first and the chief of the three great annual festivals, commemorative of the redemption of God’s people from Egypt, through the sprinkling of the blood of a lamb divinely appointed to be slain for that end; the destroying angel, “when he saw the blood, passing over” the Israelitish houses, on which that blood was seen, when he came to destroy all the first-born in the land of Egypt (Exodus 12:12, Exodus 12:13) — bright typical foreshadowing of the great Sacrifice, and the Redemption effected thereby. Accordingly, “by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, who is wonderful in counsel and excellent in working,” it was so ordered that precisely at the passover season, “Christ our Passover should be sacrificed for us.” On the day following the passover commenced “the feast of unleavened bread,” so called because for seven days only unleavened bread was to be eaten (Exodus 12:18-20). See on 1 Corinthians 5:6-8. We are further told by Matthew (Matthew 26:3) that the consultation was held in the palace of Caiaphas the high priest, between the chief priests, [the scribes], and the elders of the people, how “they might take Jesus by subtlety and kill Him.”

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Mark 14:1-11

_ _ We have here instances,

_ _ I. Of the kindness of Christ's friends, and the provision made of respect and honour for him. Some friends he had, even in and about Jerusalem, that loved him, and never thought they could do enough for him, among whom, though Israel be not gathered, he is, and will be, glorious.

_ _ 1. Here was one friend, that was so kind as to invite him to sup with him; and he was so kind as to accept the invitation, Mark 14:3. Though he had a prospect of his death approaching, yet he did not abandon himself to a melancholy retirement from all company, but conversed as freely with his friends as usual.

_ _ 2. Here was another friend, that was so kind as to anoint his head with very precious ointment as he sat at meat. This was an extraordinary piece of respect paid him by a good woman that thought nothing too good to bestow upon Christ, and to do him honour. Now the scripture was fulfilled, When the king sitteth at his table, my spikenard sendeth forth the smell thereof, Song of Songs 1:12. Let us anoint Christ as our Beloved, kiss him with a kiss of affection; and anoint him as our Sovereign, kiss him with a kiss of allegiance. Did he pour out his soul unto death for us, and shall we think any box of ointment too precious to pour out upon him? It is observable that she took care to pour it all out upon Christ's head; she broke the box (so we read it); but because it was an alabaster box, not easily broken, nor was it necessary that it should be broken, to get out the ointment, some read it, she shook the box, or knocked it to the ground, to loosen what was in it, that it might be got out the better; or, she rubbed and scraped out all that stuck tot he sides of it. Christ must have been honoured with all we have, and we must not think to keep back any part of the price. Do we give him the precious ointment of our best affections? Let him have them all; love him with all the heart.

_ _ Now, (1.) There were those that put a worse construction upon this than it deserved. They called it a waste of the ointment, Mark 14:4. Because they could not have found their hearts to put themselves to such an expense for the honouring of Christ, they thought that she was prodigal, who did. Note, As the vile person ought to be called liberal, nor the churl said to be bountiful (Isaiah 32:5); so the liberal and bountiful ought not to be called wasteful. They pretend it might have been sold, and given to the poor, Mark 14:5. But as a common piety to the corban will not excuse from a particular charity to a poor parent (Mark 7:11), so a common charity to the poor will not excuse from a particular act of piety to the Lord Jesus. What thy hand finds to do, that is good, do it with thy might.

_ _ (2.) Our Lord Jesus put a better construction upon it than, for aught that appears, was designed. Probably, she intended no more, than to show the great honour she had for him, before all the company, and to complete his entertainment. But Christ makes it to be an act of great faith, as well as great love (Mark 14:8); “She is come aforehand, to anoint my body to the burying, as if she foresaw that my resurrection would prevent her doing it afterward.” This funeral rite was a kind of presage of, or prelude to, his death approaching. See how Christ's heart was filled with the thoughts of his death, how every thing was construed with a reference to that, and how familiarly he spoke of it upon all occasions. It is usual for those who are condemned to die, to have their coffins prepared, and other provision made for their funerals, while they are yet alive; and so Christ accepted this. Christ's death and burial were the lowest steps of his humiliation, and therefore, though he cheerfully submitted to them, yet he would have some marks of honour to attend them, which might help to take off the offence of the cross, and be an intimation how precious in the sight of the Lord the death of his saints is. Christ never rode in triumph into Jerusalem, but when he came thither to suffer; nor had ever his head anointed, but for his burial.

_ _ (3.) He recommended this piece of heroic piety to the applause of the church in all ages; Wherever this gospel shall be preached, it shall be spoken of, for a memorial of her, Mark 14:9. Note, The honour which attends well-doing, even in this world, is sufficient to balance the reproach and contempt that are cast upon it. The memory of the just is blessed, and they that had trial of cruel mockings, yet obtained a good report, Hebrews 11:6, Hebrews 11:39. Thus was this good woman repaid for her box of ointment, Nec oleum perdidit nec operam — She lost neither her oil nor her labour. She got by it that good name which is better than precious ointment. Those that honour Christ he will honour.

_ _ II. Of the malice of Christ's enemies, and the preparation made by them to do him mischief.

_ _ 1. The chief priests, his open enemies, consulted how they might put him to death, Mark 14:1, Mark 14:2. The feast of the passover was now at hand, and at that feast he must be crucified, (1.) That his death and suffering might be the more public, and that all Israel, even those of the dispersion, who came from all parts to the feast, might be witnesses of it, and of the wonders that attended it. (2.) That the Anti-type might answer to the type. Christ, our Passover, was sacrificed for us, and brought us out of the house of bondage, at the same time that the paschal lamb was sacrificed, and Israel's deliverance out of Egypt was commemorated.

_ _ Now see, [1.] How spiteful Christ's enemies were; they did not think it enough to banish or imprison him, for they aimed not only to silence him, and stop his progress for the future, but to be revenged on him for all the good he had done. [2.] How subtle they were; Not on the feast-day, when the people are together; they do not say, Lest they should be disturbed in their devotions, and diverted from them, but, Lest there should be an uproar (Mark 14:2); lest they should rise, and rescue him, and fall foul upon those that attempt any thing against him. They who desired nothing more than the praise of men, dreaded nothing more than the rage and displeasure of men.

_ _ 2. Judas, his disguised enemy, contracted with them for the betraying of him, Mark 14:10, Mark 14:11. He is said to be one of the twelve that were Christ's family, intimate with him, trained up for the service of the kingdom; and he went to the chief priests, to tender his service in this affair.

_ _ (1.) That which he proposed to them, was, to betray Christ to them, and to give them notice when and where they might find him, and seize him, without making an uproar among the people, which they were afraid of, if they should seize him when he appeared in public, in the midst of his admirers. Did he know then what help it was they wanted, and where they were run aground in their counsels? It is probable that he did not, for the debate was held in their close cabal. Did they know that he had a mind to serve them, and make court to him? No, they could not imagine that any of his intimates should be so base; but Satan, who was entered into Judas, knew what occasion they had for him, and could guide him to be guide to them, who were contriving to take Jesus. Note, The spirit that works in all the children of disobedience, knows how to bring them in to the assistance one of another in a wicked project, and then to harden them in it, with the fancy that Providence favours them.

_ _ (2.) That which he proposed to himself, was, to get money by the bargain; he had what he aimed at, when they promised to give him money. Covetousness was Judas's master — lust, his own iniquity, and that betrayed him to the sin of betraying his Master; the devil suited his temptation to that, and so conquered him. It is not said, They promised him preferment (he was not ambitious of that), but, they promised him money. See what need we have to double our guard against the sin that most easily besets us. Perhaps it was Judas's covetousness that brought him at first to follow Christ, having a promise that he should be cash-keeper, or purser, to the society, and he loved in his heart to be fingering money; and now that there was money to be got on the other side, he was as ready to betray him as ever he had been to follow him. Note, Where the principle of men's profession of religion is carnal and worldly, and the serving of a secular interest, the very same principle, whenever the wind turns, will be the bitter root of a vile and scandalous apostasy.

_ _ (3.) Having secured the money, he set himself to make good his bargain; he sought how he might conveniently betray him, how he might seasonably deliver him up, so as to answer the intention of those who had hired him. See what need we have to be careful that we do not ensnare ourselves in sinful engagements. If at any time we be so ensnared in the words of our mouths, we are concerned to deliver ourselves by a speedy retreat, Proverbs 6:1-5. It is a rule in our law, as well as in our religion, that an obligation to do an evil thing is null and void; it binds to repentance, not to performance. See how the way of sin is down-hill — when men are in, they must be on; and what wicked contrivances many have in their sinful pursuits, to compass their designs conveniently; but such conveniences will prove mischiefs in the end.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes
Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Mark 14:1

After (1) two days was [the feast of] the passover, and of unleavened bread: and the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might take him by craft, and put [him] to death.

(1) By the will of God, against the counsel of men, it came to pass that Christ should be put to death upon the solemn day of the passover, that in all respects the truth of his sacrifice might agree to the symbol of the passover.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
two:

Matthew 6:2 Therefore when thou doest [thine] alms, do not sound a trumpet before thee, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may have glory of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.
Luke 22:1-2 Now the feast of unleavened bread drew nigh, which is called the Passover. ... And the chief priests and scribes sought how they might kill him; for they feared the people.
John 11:53-57 Then from that day forth they took counsel together for to put him to death. ... Now both the chief priests and the Pharisees had given a commandment, that, if any man knew where he were, he should shew [it], that they might take him.
John 13:1 Now before the feast of the passover, when Jesus knew that his hour was come that he should depart out of this world unto the Father, having loved his own which were in the world, he loved them unto the end.

the passover:

Exodus 12:6-20 And ye shall keep it up until the fourteenth day of the same month: and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening. ... Ye shall eat nothing leavened; in all your habitations shall ye eat unleavened bread.
Leviticus 23:5-7 In the fourteenth [day] of the first month at even [is] the LORD'S passover. ... In the first day ye shall have an holy convocation: ye shall do no servile work therein.
Numbers 28:16-25 And in the fourteenth day of the first month [is] the passover of the LORD. ... And on the seventh day ye shall have an holy convocation; ye shall do no servile work.
Deuteronomy 16:1-8 Observe the month of Abib, and keep the passover unto the LORD thy God: for in the month of Abib the LORD thy God brought thee forth out of Egypt by night. ... Six days thou shalt eat unleavened bread: and on the seventh day [shall be] a solemn assembly to the LORD thy God: thou shalt do no work [therein].

chief:

Psalms 2:1-5 Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing? ... Then shall he speak unto them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure.
John 11:47 Then gathered the chief priests and the Pharisees a council, and said, What do we? for this man doeth many miracles.
Acts 4:25-28 Who by the mouth of thy servant David hast said, Why did the heathen rage, and the people imagine vain things? ... For to do whatsoever thy hand and thy counsel determined before to be done.

by:

Psalms 52:3 Thou lovest evil more than good; [and] lying rather than to speak righteousness. Selah.
Psalms 62:4 They only consult to cast [him] down from his excellency: they delight in lies: they bless with their mouth, but they curse inwardly. Selah.
Psalms 62:9 Surely men of low degree [are] vanity, [and] men of high degree [are] a lie: to be laid in the balance, they [are] altogether [lighter] than vanity.
Psalms 64:2-6 Hide me from the secret counsel of the wicked; from the insurrection of the workers of iniquity: ... They search out iniquities; they accomplish a diligent search: both the inward [thought] of every one [of them], and the heart, [is] deep.
Matthew 26:4 And consulted that they might take Jesus by subtilty, and kill [him].
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Chain-Reference Bible Search

Ex 12:6. Lv 23:5. Nu 28:16. Dt 16:1. Ps 2:1; 52:3; 62:4, 9; 64:2. Mt 6:2; 26:4. Lk 22:1. Jn 11:47, 53; 13:1. Ac 4:25.

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