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Mark 13:28 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Now from the fig tree learn her parable: when her branch is now become tender, and putteth forth its leaves, ye know that the summer is nigh;
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Now learn a parable of the fig tree; When her branch is yet tender, and putteth forth leaves, ye know that summer is near:
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— “Now learn the parable from the fig tree: when its branch has already become tender and puts forth its leaves, you know that summer is near.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Now learn a parable of the fig-tree: When its branch is yet tender, and putteth forth leaves, ye know that summer is near:
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— But learn the parable from the fig-tree: when its branch already becomes tender and puts forth the leaves, ye know that the summer is near.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Now, from the fig-tree, learn ye, the parable:—When, already, her young branch, becometh tender, and, the leaves, are sprouting, ye observe that, near, is, the summer:
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— 'And from the fig-tree learn ye the simile: when the branch may already become tender, and may put forth the leaves, ye know that nigh is the summer;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Now of the fig tree learn ye a parable. When the branch thereof is now tender and the leaves are come forth, you know that summer is very near.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Now learne a parable of the fig tree. When her branch is yet tender, and putteth forth leaues, ye know that summer is neere:
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— But from the fig-tree learn a parable. When her branches are tender, and she shoots forth her leaves, you know that the summer draws nigh:
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And, from the fig-tree learn ye a simile. When its twigs are tender, and its leaves bud forth, ye know that summer approacheth.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Now 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
learn 3129
{3129} Prime
μανθάνω
manthano
{man-than'-o}
Prolonged from a primary verb, another form of which, μαθέω [[matheo]], is used as an alternate in certain tenses; to learn (in any way).
z5628
<5628> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Imperative (See G5794)
Count - 459
a parable 3850
{3850} Prime
παραβολή
parabole
{par-ab-ol-ay'}
From G3846; a similitude ('parable'), that is, (symbolically) fictitious narrative (of common life conveying a moral), apoth gm or adage.
of 575
{0575} Prime
ἀπό
apo
{ap-o'}
A primary particle; 'off', that is, away (from something near), in various senses (of place, time, or relation; literally or figuratively).
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
fig tree; 4808
{4808} Prime
συκῆ
suke
{soo-kay'}
From G4810; a fig tree.
When 3752
{3752} Prime
ὅταν
hotan
{hot'-an}
From G3753 and G0302; whenever (implying hypothesis or more or less uncertainty); also causative (conjugationally) inasmuch as.
her 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
branch 2798
{2798} Prime
κλάδος
klados
{klad'-os}
From G2806; a twig or bough (as if broken off).
is 1096
{1096} Prime
γίνομαι
ginomai
{ghin'-om-ahee}
A prolonged and middle form of a primary verb; to cause to be ('gen' -erate), that is, (reflexively) to become (come into being), used with great latitude (literally, figuratively, intensively, etc.).
z5638
<5638> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Middle Deponent (See G5788)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 66
yet 2235
{2235} Prime
ἤδη
ede
{ay'-day}
Apparently from G2228 (or possibly G2229) and G1211; even now.
tender, 527
{0527} Prime
ἁπαλός
apalos
{ap-al-os'}
Of uncertain derivation; soft.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
putteth forth 1631
{1631} Prime
ἐκφύω
ekphuo
{ek-foo'-o}
From G1537 and G5453; to sprout up.
z5725
<5725> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 352
leaves, 5444
{5444} Prime
φύλλον
phullon
{fool'-lon}
From the same as G5443; a sprout, that is, leaf.
ye know 1097
{1097} Prime
γινώσκω
ginosko
{ghin-oce'-ko}
A prolonged form of a primary verb; to 'know' (absolutely), in a great variety of applications and with many implications (as shown at left, with others not thus clearly expressed).
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
that 3754
{3754} Prime
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
summer 2330
{2330} Prime
θέρος
theros
{ther'-os}
From a primary word θέρω [[thero]] (to heat); properly heat, that is, summer.
is 2076
{2076} Prime
ἐστί
esti
{es-tee'}
Third person singular present indicative of G1510; he (she or it) is; also (with neuter plural) they are.
z5748
<5748> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 1612
near: 1451
{1451} Prime
ἐγγύς
eggus
{eng-goos'}
From a primary verb ἄγχω [[agcho]] (to squeeze or throttle; akin to the base of G0043); near (literally or figuratively, of place or time).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Mark 13:28

_ _ Now learn a parable of the fig tree — “Now from the fig tree learn the parable,” or the high lesson which this teaches.

_ _ When her branch is yet tender, and putteth forth leaves — “its leaves.”

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Mark 13:28-37

_ _ We have here the application of this prophetical sermon; now learn to look forward in a right manner.

_ _ I. “As to the destruction of Jerusalem, expect it to come very shortly; as when the branch of the fig-tree becomes soft, and the leaves sprout forth, ye expect that summer will come shortly, Mark 13:28. When second causes begin to work, ye expect their effects in their proper order and time. So when ye see these things come to pass, when ye see the Jewish nation embroiled in wars, distracted by false Christs and prophets, and drawing upon them the displeasure of the Romans, especially when ye see them persecuting you for your Master's sake, and thereby standing to what they did when they put him to death, and repeating it, and so filling up the measure of their iniquity, then say that their ruin is nigh, even at the door, and provide for yourselves accordingly.” The disciples themselves were indeed all of them, except John, taken away from the evil to come, but the next generation whom they were to train up, would live to see it; and by these instructions which Christ left behind him would be kept from sharing in it; “This generation that is now rising up, shall not all be worn off before all these things come to pass, which I have told you of, relating to Jerusalem, and they shall begin to take effect now shortly. And as this destruction is near and within ken, so it is sure. The decree is gone forth, it is a consummation determined,Daniel 9:27. Christ doth not speak these things, merely to frighten them; no, they are declarations of God's fixed purpose; “Heaven and earth shall pass away, at the end of time; but my words shall not pass away (Mark 13:31), not one of these predictions shall fail of a punctual accomplishment.”

_ _ II. “As to the end of the world, do not enquire when it will come, for it is not a question fit to be asked, for of that day, and that hour, knoweth no man; it is a thing at a great distance; the exact time is fixed in the counsel of God, but is not revealed by any word of God, either to men on earth, or to angels in heaven; the angels shall have timely notice to prepare to attend in that day, and it shall be published, when it comes to the children of men, with sound of trumpet; but, at present, men and angels are kept in the dark concerning the precise time of it, that they may both attend to their proper services in the present day.” But it follows, neither the Son; but is there any thing which the Son is ignorant of? We read indeed of a book which was sealed, till the Lamb opened the seals; but did not he know what was in it, before the seals were opened? Was not he privy to the writing of it? There were those in the primitive times, who taught from this text, that there were some things that Christ, as man, was ignorant of; and from these were called Agnoetae; they said, “It was no more absurd to say so, than to say that his human soul suffered grief and fear;” and many of the orthodox fathers approved of this. Some would evade it, by saying that Christ spoke this in a way of prudential economy, to divert the disciples from further enquiry: but to this one of the ancients answers, It is not fit to speak too nicely in this matterou dei panu akribologein, so Leontius in Dr. Hammond, “It is certain (says Archbishop Tillotson) that Christ, as God, could not be ignorant of any thing; but the divine wisdom which dwelt in our Saviour, did communicate itself to his human soul, according to the divine pleasure, so that his human nature might sometimes not know some things; therefore Christ is said to grow in wisdom (Luke 2:52), which he could not be said to do, if the human nature of Christ did necessarily know all things by virtue of its union with the divinity.” Dr. Lightfoot explains it thus; Christ calls himself the Son, as Messiah. Now the Messiah, as such, was the father's servant (Isaiah 42:1), sent and deputed by him, and as such a one he refers himself often to his Father's will and command, and owns he did nothing of himself (John 5:19); in like manner he might be said to know nothing of himself. The revelation of Jesus Christ was what God gave unto him, Revelation 1:1. He thinks, therefore, that we are to distinguish between those excellencies and perfections of his, which resulted from the personal union between the divine and human nature, and those which flowed from the anointing of the Spirit; from the former flowed the infinite dignity of his perfect freedom from all sin; but from the latter flowed his power of working miracles, and his foreknowledge of things to come. What therefore (saith he) was to be revealed by him to his church, he was pleased to take, not from the union of the human nature with the divine, but from the revelation of the Spirit, by which he yet knew not this, but the Father only knows it; that is, God only, the Deity; for (as Archbishop Tillotson explains it) it is not used here personally, in distinction from the Son and the Holy Ghost, but as the Father is, Fons et Principium DeitatisThe Fountain of Deity.

_ _ III. “As to both, your duty is to watch and pray. Therefore the time is kept a secret, that you may be engaged to stand always upon your guard (Mark 13:33); Take ye heed of every thing that would indispose you for your Master's coming, and would render your accounts perplexed, and your spirits so too; watch for his coming, that it may not at any time be a surprise to you, and pray for that grace which is necessary to qualify you for it, for ye know not when the time is; and you are concerned to be ready for that every day, which may come any day.” This he illustrates, in the close, by a parable.

_ _ 1. Our Master is gone away, and left us something in trust, in charge, which we must give account of, Mark 13:34. He is as a man taking a far journey; for he is gone to be away a great while, he has left his house on earth, and left his servants in their offices, given authority to some, who are to be overseers, and work to others, who are to be labourers. They that have authority given them, in that had work assigned them, for those that have the greatest power have the most business; and to them to whom he gave work, he gave some sort of authority, to do that work. And when he took his last leave, he appointed the porter to watch, to be sure to be ready to open to him at his return; and in the mean time to take care to whom he opened his gates, not to thieves and robbers, but only to his Master's friends and servants. Thus our Lord Jesus, when he ascended on high, left something for all his servants to do, expecting they should all do him service in his absence, and be ready to receive him at his return. All are appointed to work, and some authorized to rule.

_ _ 2. We ought to be always upon our watch, in expectation of his return, Mark 13:35-37. (1.) Our Lord will come, and will come as the Master of the house, to take account of his servants, of their work, and of the improvement they have made. (2.) We know not when he will come; and he has very wisely kept us at uncertainty, that we might all be always ready. We know not when he will come, just at what precise time; the Master of the house perhaps will come at even, at nine at night; or it may be at midnight, or a cock-crowing, at three in the morning, or perhaps not until six. This is applicable to his coming to us in particular, at our death, as well as to the general judgment. Our present life is a night, a dark night, compared with the other life; we know not in which watch of the night our Master will come, whether in the days of youth, or middle age, or old age; but, as soon as we are born, we begin to die, and therefore, as soon as we are capable of expecting any thing, we must expect death. (3.) Our great care must be, that, whenever our Lord comes, he do not find us sleeping, secure in ourselves, off our guard, indulging ourselves in ease and sloth, mindless of our work and duty, and thoughtless of our Lord's coming; ready to say, He will not come, and unready to meet him. (4.) His coming will indeed be coming suddenly; it will be a great surprise and terror to those that are careless, and asleep, it will come upon them as a thief in the night. (5.) It is therefore the indispensable duty of all Christ's disciples, to watch, to be awake, and keep awake; “What I say unto you four (Mark 13:37), I say unto all the twelve, or rather to you twelve, I say unto all my disciples and followers; what I say to you of this generation, I say to all that shall believe in men, through your word, in every age, Watch, watch, expect my second coming, prepare for it, that you may be found in peace, without spot, and blameless.”

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes
Geneva Bible Translation Notes

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Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance

Matthew 24:32-33 Now learn a parable of the fig tree; When his branch is yet tender, and putteth forth leaves, ye know that summer [is] nigh: ... So likewise ye, when ye shall see all these things, know that it is near, [even] at the doors.
Luke 21:29-31 And he spake to them a parable; Behold the fig tree, and all the trees; ... So likewise ye, when ye see these things come to pass, know ye that the kingdom of God is nigh at hand.
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Mt 24:32. Lk 21:29.

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