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Mark 12:13 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And they send unto him certain of the Pharisees and of the Herodians, that they might catch him in talk.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And they send unto him certain of the Pharisees and of the Herodians, to catch him in [his] words.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Then they *sent some of the Pharisees and Herodians to Him in order to trap Him in a statement.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And they sent to him certain of the Pharisees, and of the Herodians, to catch him in [his] words.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And they send to him certain of the Pharisees and of the Herodians, that they might catch him in speaking.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And they send forth unto him certain of the Pharisees and of the Herodians, that they might, catch, him, in discourse.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— and they send unto him certain of the Pharisees and of the Herodians, that they may ensnare him in discourse,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And they sent to him some of the Pharisees and of the Herodians: that they should catch him in his words.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And they send vnto him certaine of the Pharises, and of the Herodians, to catch him in his words.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And they sent to him men from the Sophree and from the house of Herodes, that they should ensnare him in discourse.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And they sent to him some of the Scribes and of the household of Herod, to ensnare him in discourse.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
they send 649
{0649} Prime
ἀποστέλλω
apostello
{ap-os-tel'-lo}
From G0575 and G4724; set apart, that is, (by implication) to send out (properly on a mission) literally or figuratively.
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
unto 4314
{4314} Prime
πρός
pros
{pros}
A strengthened form of G4253; a preposition of direction; forward to, that is, toward (with the genitive case the side of, that is, pertaining to; with the dative case by the side of, that is, near to; usually with the accusative case the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, that is, whither or for which it is predicated).
him 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
certain 5100
{5100} Prime
τὶς
tis
{tis}
An enclitic indefinite pronoun; some or any person or object.
of the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
Pharisees 5330
{5330} Prime
Φαρισαῖος
Pharisaios
{far-is-ah'-yos}
Of Hebrew origin (compare [H6567]); a separatist, that is, exclusively religious; a Pharisaean, that is, Jewish sectary.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
of the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
Herodians, 2265
{2265} Prime
Ἡρῳδιανοί
Herodianoi
{hay-ro-dee-an-oy'}
Plural of a derivative of G2264; Herodians, that is, partisans of Herodes.
to 2443
{2443} Prime
ἵνα
hina
{hin'-ah}
Probably from the same as the former part of G1438 (through the demonstrative idea; compare G3588); in order that (denoting the purpose or the result).
catch 64
{0064} Prime
ἀγρεύω
agreuo
{ag-rew'-o}
From G0061; to hunt, that is, (figuratively) to entrap.
z5661
<5661> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 512
him 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
in [his] words. 3056
{3056} Prime
λόγος
logos
{log'-os}
From G3004; something said (including the thought); by implication a topic (subject of discourse), also reasoning (the mental faculty) or motive; by extension a computation; specifically (with the article in John) the Divine Expression (that is, Christ).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Mark 12:13

_ _ Mark 12:13-40. Entangling questions about tribute, the resurrection, and the great commandment, with the replies — Christ baffles the Pharisees by a question about David, and denounces the Scribes. ( = Matthew 22:15-46; Luke 20:20-47).

_ _ The time of this section appears to be still the third day (Tuesday) of Christ’s last week. Matthew introduces the subject by saying (Matthew 22:15), “Then went the Pharisees and took counsel how they might entangle Him in His talk.”

_ _ And they send unto him certain of the Pharisees — “their disciples,” says Matthew (Matthew 22:16); probably young and zealous scholars in that hardening school.

_ _ and of the Herodians — (See on Matthew 12:14). In Luke 20:20 these willing tools are called “spies, which should feign themselves just [righteous] men, that they might take hold of His words, that so they might deliver Him unto the power and authority of the governor.” Their plan, then, was to entrap Him into some expression which might be construed into disaffection to the Roman government; the Pharisees themselves being notoriously discontented with the Roman yoke.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Mark 12:13-17

_ _ When the enemies of Christ, who thirsted for his blood, could not find occasion against him from what he said against them, they tried to ensnare him by putting questions to him. Here we have him tempted, or attempted rather, with a question about the lawfulness of paying tribute to Caesar. We had this narrative, Matthew 22:15.

_ _ I. The persons they employed were the Pharisees and the Herodians, men that in this matter were contrary to one another, and yet concurred against Christ, Mark 12:13. The Pharisees were great sticklers for the liberty of the Jews, and, if he should say, It is lawful to give tribute to Caesar, they would incense the common people against him, and the Herodians would, underhand, assist them in it. The Herodians were great sticklers for the Roman power, and, if he should discountenance the paying of tribute to Caesar, they would incense the governor against hum, yea, and the Pharisees, against their own principles, would join with them in it. It is no new thing for those that are at variance in other things, to join in a confederacy against Christ.

_ _ II. The pretence they made was, that they desired him to resolve them a case of conscience, which was of great importance in the present juncture; and they take on them to have a high opinion of his ability to resolve it, Mark 12:14. They complimented him at a high rate, called him Master, owned him for a Teacher of the way of God, a Teacher of it in truth, one who taught what was good, and upon principles of truth, who would not be brought by smiles or frowns to depart a step from the rules of equity and goodness; “Thou carest for no man, nor regardest the person of men, thou art not afraid of offending either the jealous prince on one hand, or the jealous people on the other; thou art right, and always in the right, and dost in a right manner declare good and evil, truth and falsehood.” If they spoke as they thought concerning Christ, when they said, We know that thou art right, their persecuting him, and putting him to death, as a deceiver, was sin against knowledge; they knew him, and yet crucified him. However, a man's testimony shall be taken most strongly against himself, and out of their own mouths are they judged; they knew that he taught the way of God in truth, and yet rejected the counsel of God against themselves. The professions and pretences of hypocrites will be produced in evidence against them, and they will be self-condemned. But if they did not know or believe it, they lied unto God with their mouth, and flattered him with their tongue.

_ _ III. The question they put was, Is it lawful to give tribute to Caesar, or not? They would be thought desirous to know their duty. As a nation that did righteousness, they ask of God the ordinances of justice, when really they desired nothing but to know what he would say, in hopes that, which side soever he took of the question, they might take occasion from it to accuse him. Nothing is more likely to ensnare ministers, than bringing them to meddle with controversies about civil rights, and to settle land-marks between the prince and the subject, which it is fit should be done, while it is not at all fit that they should have the doing of it. They seemed to refer the determining of this matter to Christ; and he indeed was fit to determine it, for by him kings reign, and princes decree justice; they put the question fairly, Shall we give, or shall we not give? They seemed resolved to stand to his award; “If thou sayest that we must pay tribute, we will do it, thou we be made beggars by it. If thou sayest that we must not, we will not, though we be made traitors for it.” Many seemed desirous to do it; as those proud men, Jeremiah 42:20.

_ _ IV. Christ determined the question, and evaded the snare, by referring them to their national concessions already made, by which they were precluded from disputing this matter, Mark 12:15-17. He knew their hypocrisy, the malice that was in their hearts against him, while with their mouth they showed all this love. Hypocrisy, though ever so artfully managed, cannot be concealed from the Lord Jesus. He sees the potsherd that is covered with the silver dross. He knew they intended to ensnare him, and therefore contrived the matter so as to ensnare them, and to oblige them by their own words to do what they were unwilling to do, which was, to pay their taxes honestly and quietly, and yet at the same time to screen himself against their exceptions. He made them acknowledge that the current money of their nation was Roman money, had the emperor's image on one side, and his superscription on the reverse; and if so, 1. Caesar might command their money for the public benefit, because he had the custody and conduct of the state, wherein he ought to have his charges borne; Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's. The circulation of the money is from him as the fountain, and therefore it must return to him. As far as it is his, so far it must be rendered to him; and how far it is his, and may be commanded by him, is to be judged by the constitution of the government, according as it is, and hath settled the prerogative of the prince and the property of the subject. 2. Caesar might not command their consciences, nor did he pretend to it; he offered not to make any alteration in their religion. “Pay your tribute, therefore, without murmuring or disputing, but be sure to render to God the things that are God's.” Perhaps he referred to the parable he had just now put forth, in which he had condemned them for not rendering the fruits to the Lord of the vineyard, Mark 12:2. Many that seem careful to give to men their due, are in no care to give God the glory due to his name; whereas our hearts and best affections are as much due to him as ever rent was to a landlord, or tribute to a prince. All that heard Christ, marvelled at the discretion of his answer, and how ingenuously he avoided the snare; but I doubt none were brought by it, as they ought to be, to render to God themselves and their devotions. Many will commend the wit of a sermon, that will not be commanded by the divine laws of a sermon.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes
Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Mark 12:13

(2) And they send unto him certain of the Pharisees and of the Herodians, to catch him in [his] words.

(2) The gospel links the authority of the magistrate with the service of God.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
they send:

Psalms 38:12 They also that seek after my life lay snares [for me]: and they that seek my hurt speak mischievous things, and imagine deceits all the day long.
Psalms 56:5-6 Every day they wrest my words: all their thoughts [are] against me for evil. ... They gather themselves together, they hide themselves, they mark my steps, when they wait for my soul.
Psalms 140:5 The proud have hid a snare for me, and cords; they have spread a net by the wayside; they have set gins for me. Selah.
Isaiah 29:21 That make a man an offender for a word, and lay a snare for him that reproveth in the gate, and turn aside the just for a thing of nought.
Jeremiah 18:18 Then said they, Come, and let us devise devices against Jeremiah; for the law shall not perish from the priest, nor counsel from the wise, nor the word from the prophet. Come, and let us smite him with the tongue, and let us not give heed to any of his words.
Matthew 22:15-16 Then went the Pharisees, and took counsel how they might entangle him in [his] talk. ... And they sent out unto him their disciples with the Herodians, saying, Master, we know that thou art true, and teachest the way of God in truth, neither carest thou for any [man]: for thou regardest not the person of men.
Luke 11:54 Laying wait for him, and seeking to catch something out of his mouth, that they might accuse him.
Luke 20:20-26 And they watched [him], and sent forth spies, which should feign themselves just men, that they might take hold of his words, that so they might deliver him unto the power and authority of the governor. ... And they could not take hold of his words before the people: and they marvelled at his answer, and held their peace.

Herodians:

Mark 3:6 And the Pharisees went forth, and straightway took counsel with the Herodians against him, how they might destroy him.
Mark 8:15 And he charged them, saying, Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and [of] the leaven of Herod.
Matthew 16:6 Then Jesus said unto them, Take heed and beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees.
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Chain-Reference Bible Search

Ps 38:12; 56:5; 140:5. Is 29:21. Jr 18:18. Mt 16:6; 22:15. Mk 3:6; 8:15. Lk 11:54; 20:20.

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