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Mark 10:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And he arose from thence and cometh into the borders of Judaea and beyond the Jordan: and multitudes come together unto him again; and, as he was wont, he taught them again.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And he arose from thence, and cometh into the coasts of Judaea by the farther side of Jordan: and the people resort unto him again; and, as he was wont, he taught them again.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Getting up, He *went from there to the region of Judea and beyond the Jordan; crowds *gathered around Him again, and, according to His custom, He once more [began] to teach them.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And he arose from thence, and cometh into the borders of Judea, by the further side of Jordan: and the people resort to him again; and, as he was accustomed, he taught them again.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And rising up thence he comes into the coasts of Judaea, and the other side of the Jordan. And again crowds come together to him, and, as he was accustomed, again he taught them.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And, from thence, arising, he cometh into the bounds of Judaea and beyond the Jordan,—and there come together again, multitudes unto him, and, as he had been wont, again, was he teaching them.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And having risen thence, he doth come to the coasts of Judea, through the other side of the Jordan, and again do multitudes come together unto him, and, as he had been accustomed, again he was teaching them.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And rising up from thence, he cometh into the coast of Judea beyond the Jordan: and the multitude flocked to him again. And as he was accustomed, he taught them again.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And he rose from thence, & commeth into the coasts of Iudea by the farther side of Iordan: and the people resort vnto him againe, and as he was wont, he taught them againe.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— AND he arose from thence, and came to the borders of Jehud on the other side of the Jurdan: and great multitudes went thither to him; and he taught them again as he was accustomed.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And he arose from there, and came to the border of Judaea, on the other side the Jordan. And great multitudes came to him there; and again he instructed them, as he was accustomed.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And y2547
[2547] Standard
κἀκεῖθεν
kakeithen
{kak-i'-then}
From G2532 and G1564; likewise from that place (or time).
z0
<0000> Grammar
The original word in the Greek or Hebrew is translated by more than one word in the English. The English translation is separated by one or more other words from the original.
he arose y450
[0450] Standard
ἀνίστημι
anistemi
{an-is'-tay-mee}
From G0303 and G2476; to stand up (literally or figuratively, transitively or intransitively).
z5631
<5631> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 889
from thence, 2547
{2547} Prime
κἀκεῖθεν
kakeithen
{kak-i'-then}
From G2532 and G1564; likewise from that place (or time).
x450
(0450) Complement
ἀνίστημι
anistemi
{an-is'-tay-mee}
From G0303 and G2476; to stand up (literally or figuratively, transitively or intransitively).
and cometh 2064
{2064} Prime
ἔρχομαι
erchomai
{er'-khom-ahee}
Middle voice of a primary verb (used only in the present and imperfect tenses, the others being supplied by a kindred [middle voice] word, ἐλεύθομαι [[eleuthomai]], {el-yoo'-thom-ahee}; or [active] ἔλθω [[eltho]], {el'-tho}; which do not otherwise occur); to come or go (in a great variety of applications, literally and figuratively).
z5736
<5736> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 618
into 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
coasts 3725
{3725} Prime
ὅριον
horion
{hor'-ee-on}
Neuter of a derivative of an apparently primary word ὅρος [[horos]] (a bound or limit); a boundary line, that is, (by implication) a frontier (region).
of Judaea 2449
{2449} Prime
Ἰουδαία
Ioudaia
{ee-oo-dah'-yah}
Feminine of G2453 (with G1093 implied); the Judaean land (that is, judaea), a region of Palestine.
by 1223
{1223} Prime
διά
dia
{dee-ah'}
A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through (in very wide applications, local, causal or occasional). In composition it retains the same general import.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
farther side 4008
{4008} Prime
πέραν
peran
{per'-an}
Apparently the accusative case of an obsolete derivation of πείρω [[peiro]] (to 'pierce'); through (as adverb or preposition), that is, across.
of Jordan: 2446
{2446} Prime
Ἰορδάνης
Iordanes
{ee-or-dan'-ace}
Of Hebrew origin [H3383]; the Jordanes (that is, Jarden), a river of Palestine.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
the people 3793
{3793} Prime
ὄχλος
ochlos
{okh'-los}
From a derivative of G2192 (meaning a vehicle); a throng (as borne along); by implication the rabble; by extension a class of people; figuratively a riot.
resort 4848
{4848} Prime
συμπορεύομαι
sumporeuomai
{soom-por-yoo'-om-ahee}
From G4862 and G4198; to journey together; by implication to assemble.
z5736
<5736> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 618
unto 4314
{4314} Prime
πρός
pros
{pros}
A strengthened form of G4253; a preposition of direction; forward to, that is, toward (with the genitive case the side of, that is, pertaining to; with the dative case by the side of, that is, near to; usually with the accusative case the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, that is, whither or for which it is predicated).
him 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
again; 3825
{3825} Prime
πάλιν
palin
{pal'-in}
Probably from the same as G3823 (through the idea of oscillatory repetition); (adverbially) anew, that is, (of place) back, (of time) once more, or (conjugationally) furthermore or on the other hand.
and, 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
as 5613
{5613} Prime
ὡς
hos
{hoce}
Probably adverb of comparative from G3739; which how, that is, in that manner (very variously used as shown).
he was wont, 1486
{1486} Prime
ἔθω
etho
{eth'-o}
A primary verb; to be used (by habit or conventionality); neuter perfect participle usage.
z5715
<5715> Grammar
Tense - Pluperfect (See G5779)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 83
he taught 1321
{1321} Prime
διδάσκω
didasko
{did-as'-ko}
A prolonged (causative) form of a primary verb δάω [[dao]] (to learn); to teach (in the same broad application).
z5707
<5707> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 855
them 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
again. 3825
{3825} Prime
πάλιν
palin
{pal'-in}
Probably from the same as G3823 (through the idea of oscillatory repetition); (adverbially) anew, that is, (of place) back, (of time) once more, or (conjugationally) furthermore or on the other hand.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Mark 10:1-12

_ _ Mark 10:1-12. Final departure from Galilee — Divorce. ( = Matthew 19:1-12; Luke 9:51).

_ _ See on Matthew 19:1-12.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Mark 10:1-12

_ _ Our Lord Jesus was an itinerant Preacher, did not continue long in a place, for the whole land of Canaan was his parish, or diocese, and therefore he would visit every part of it, and give instructions to those in the remotest corners of it. Here we have him in the coasts of Judea, by the further side of Jordan eastward, as we found him, not long since, in the utmost borders westward, near Tyre and Sidon. Thus was his circuit like that of the sun, from whose light and heat nothing is hid. Now here we have him,

_ _ I. Resorted to by the people, Mark 10:1. Wherever he was, they flocked after him in crowds; they came to him again, as they had done when he had formerly been in these parts, and, as he was wont, he taught them again. Note, Preaching was Christ's constant practice; it was what he was used to, and, wherever he came, he did as he was wont. In Matthew it is said, He healed them; here it is said, He taught them: his cures were to confirm his doctrine, and to recommend it, and his doctrine was to explain his cures, and illustrate them. He taught them again. Note, Even those whom Christ hath taught, have need to be taught again. Such is the fulness of the Christian doctrine, that there is still more to be learned; and such our forgetfulness, that we need to be reminded of what we do know.

_ _ II. We have him disputed with by the Pharisees, who envied the progress of his spiritual arms, and did all they could to obstruct and oppose it; to divert him, to perplex him, and to prejudice the people against him.

_ _ Here is, 1. A question they started concerning divorce (Mark 10:2); Is it lawful for a man to put away his wife? This was a good question, if it had been well put, and with a humble desire to know the mind of God in this matter; but they proposed it, tempting him, seeking an occasion against him, and an opportunity to expose him, which side soever he should take of the question. Ministers must stand upon their guard, lest, under pretence of being advised with, they be ensnared.

_ _ 2. Christ's reply to them with a question (Mark 10:3); What did Moses command you? This he asked them, to testify his respect to the law of Moses, and to show that he came not to destroy it; and to engage them to a universal impartial respect for Moses's writings and to compare one part of them with another.

_ _ 3. The fair account they gave of what they found in the law of Moses, expressly concerning divorce, Mark 10:4. Christ asked, What did Moses command you? They own that Moses only suffered, or permitted, a man to write his wife a bill of divorce, and to put her away, Deuteronomy 24:1. “If you will do it, you must do it in writing, delivered into her own hand, and so put her away, and never return to her again.”

_ _ 4. The answer that Christ gave to their question, in which he abides by the doctrine he had formerly laid down in this case (Matthew 5:32), That whosoever puts away his wife, except for fornication, causeth her to commit adultery. And to clear this he here shows,

_ _ (1.) That the reason why Moses, in his law, permitted divorce, was such, as that they ought not to make use of that permission; for it was only for the hardness of their hearts (Mark 10:5), lest, if they were not permitted to divorce their wives, they should murder them; so that none must put away their wives but such as are willing to own that their hearts were so hard as to need this permission.

_ _ (2.) That the account which Moses, in this history, gives of the institution of marriage, affords such a reason against divorce, as amounts to a prohibition of it. So that if the question be, What did Moses command? (Mark 10:3), it must be answered, “Though by a temporary proviso he allowed divorce to the Jews, yet by an eternal reason he forbade it to all the children of Adam and Eve, and that is it which we must abide by.”

_ _ Moses tells us, [1.] That God made man male and female, one male, and one female; so that Adam could not put away his wife and take another, for there was no other to take, which was an intimation to all his sons, that they must not. [2.] When this male and this female were, by the ordinance of God, joined together in holy marriage, the law was, That a man must leave his father and mother, and cleave to his wife (Mark 10:7); which intimates not only the nearness of the relation, but the perpetuity of it; he shall so cleave to his wife as not to be separated from her. [3.] The result of the relation is, That, though they are two, yet they are one, they are one flesh, Mark 10:8. The union between them is the most intimate that can be, and, as Dr. Hammond expresses it, a sacred thing that must not be violated. [4.] God himself was joined them together; he has not only, as Creator, fitted them to be comforts and helps meet for each other, but he has, in wisdom and goodness, appointed them who are thus joined together, to live together in love till death parts them. Marriage is not an invention of men, but a divine institution, and therefore is to be religiously observed, and the more, because it is a figure of the mystical inseparable union between Christ and his church.

_ _ Now from all this he infers, that men ought not to put their wives asunder from them, whom God has put so near them. The bond which God himself has tied, is not to be lightly untied. They who are divorcing their wives for every offence, would do well to consider what would become of them, if God should in like manner deal with them. See Isaiah 50:1; Jeremiah 3:1.

_ _ 5. Christ's discourse with his disciples, in private, about this matter, Mark 10:10-12. It was an advantage to them, that they had opportunity of personal converse with Christ, not only about gospel mysteries, but about moral duties, for further satisfaction. No more is here related of this private conference, that the law Christ laid down in this case — That it is adultery for a man to put away his wife, and marry another; it is adultery against the wife he puts away, it is a wrong to her, a breach of his contract with her, Mark 10:11. He adds, If a woman shall put away her husband, that is, elope from him, leave him by consent, and be married to another, she commits adultery (Mark 10:12), and it will be no excuse at all for her to say that it was with the consent of her husband. Wisdom and grace, holiness and love, reigning in the heart, will make those commands easy which to the carnal mind may be as a heavy yoke.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Mark 10:1

He cometh thence — From Galilee. Matthew 19:1.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Mark 10:1

And he (a) arose from thence, and cometh into the coasts of Judaea by the farther side of Jordan: and the people resort unto him again; and, as he was wont, he taught them again.

(a) That is to say, departed and went from there: for in the Hebrew language sitting and dwelling are the same thing, and so are rising and going forth.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
am 4033, ad 29

he arose:

Matthew 19:1-12 And it came to pass, [that] when Jesus had finished these sayings, he departed from Galilee, and came into the coasts of Judaea beyond Jordan; ... For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from [their] mother's womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake. He that is able to receive [it], let him receive [it].

by:

John 10:40 And went away again beyond Jordan into the place where John at first baptized; and there he abode.
John 11:7 Then after that saith he to [his] disciples, Let us go into Judaea again.

he taught:

Ecclesiastes 12:9 And moreover, because the preacher was wise, he still taught the people knowledge; yea, he gave good heed, and sought out, [and] set in order many proverbs.
Jeremiah 32:33 And they have turned unto me the back, and not the face: though I taught them, rising up early and teaching [them], yet they have not hearkened to receive instruction.
John 18:20 Jesus answered him, I spake openly to the world; I ever taught in the synagogue, and in the temple, whither the Jews always resort; and in secret have I said nothing.
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Ec 12:9. Jr 32:33. Mt 19:1. Jn 10:40; 11:7; 18:20.

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