Parallel Bible VersionsGreek Bible Study Tools

Luke 9:10 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And the apostles, when they were returned, declared unto him what things they had done. And he took them, and withdrew apart to a city called Bethsaida.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And the apostles, when they were returned, told him all that they had done. And he took them, and went aside privately into a desert place belonging to the city called Bethsaida.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— When the apostles returned, they gave an account to Him of all that they had done. Taking them with Him, He withdrew by Himself to a city called Bethsaida.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And the apostles, when they had returned, told him all that they had done. And he took them, and went aside privately into a desert place, belonging to the city called Bethsaida.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And the apostles having returned related to him whatever they had done. And he took them and withdrew apart into [a desert place of] a city called Bethsaida.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And the Apostles, returning, related to him what great things they had done. And, taking them aside, he retired privately, into a city called Bethsaida.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And the apostles having turned back, declared to him how great things they did, and having taken them, he withdrew by himself to a desert place of a city called Bethsaida,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And the apostles, when they were returned, told him all they had done. And taking them, he went aside into a desert place, apart, which belongeth to Bethsaida.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And the Apostles when they were returned, tolde him all that they had done. And hee tooke them, and went aside priuately into a desert place, belonging to the citie called Bethsaida.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And when the apostles returned, they showed Jeshu all that they had done. And he took them by themselves to a desert place of Bethtsaida.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And when the Legates returned, they narrated, to Jesus all they had done. And he took them aside, to the desert part of Bethsaida.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
apostles, 652
{0652} Prime
ἀπόστολος
apostolos
{ap-os'-tol-os}
From G0649; a delegate; specifically an ambassador of the Gospel; officially a commissioner of Christ ('apostle'), (with miraculous powers).
when they were returned, 5290
{5290} Prime
ὑποστρέφω
hupostrepho
{hoop-os-tref'-o}
From G5259 and G4762; to turn under (behind), that is, to return (literally or figuratively).
z5660
<5660> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 714
told 1334
{1334} Prime
διηγέομαι
diegeomai
{dee-ayg-eh'-om-ahee}
From G1223 and G2233; to relate fully.
z5662
<5662> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Middle Deponent (See G5788)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 352
him 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
all that 3745
{3745} Prime
ὅσος
hosos
{hos'-os}
By reduplication from G3739; as (much, great, long, etc.) as.
they had done. 4160
{4160} Prime
ποιέω
poieo
{poy-eh'-o}
Apparently a prolonged form of an obsolete primary; to make or do (in a very wide application, more or less direct).
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
he took 3880
{3880} Prime
παραλαμβάνω
paralambano
{par-al-am-ban'-o}
From G3844 and G2983; to receive near, that is, associate with oneself (in any familiar or intimate act or relation); by analogy to assume an office; figuratively to learn.
z5631
<5631> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 889
them, 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
and went aside 5298
{5298} Prime
ὑποχωρέω
hupochoreo
{hoop-okh-o-reh'-o}
From G5259 and G5562; to vacate down, that is, retire quietly.
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
privately 2596
{2596} Prime
κατά
kata
{kat-ah'}
A primary particle; (preposition) down (in place or time), in varied relations (according to the case [genitive, dative or accusative] with which it is joined).
2398
{2398} Prime
ἴδιος
idios
{id'-ee-os}
Of uncertain affinity; pertaining to self, that is, one's own; by implication private or separate.
into 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
a desert 2048
{2048} Prime
ἔρημος
eremos
{er'-ay-mos}
Of uncertain affinity; lonesome, that is, (by implication) waste (usually as a noun, G5561 being implied).
place 5117
{5117} Prime
τόπος
topos
{top'-os}
Apparently a primary word; a spot (generally in space, but limited by occupancy; whereas G5561 is a larger but particular locality), that is, location (as a position, home, tract, etc.); figuratively condition, opportunity; specifically a scabbard.
belonging to the city 4172
{4172} Prime
πόλις
polis
{pol'-is}
Probably from the same as G4171, or perhaps from G4183; a town (properly with walls, of greater or less size).
called 2564
{2564} Prime
καλέω
kaleo
{kal-eh'-o}
Akin to the base of G2753; to 'call' (properly aloud, but used in a variety of applications, directly or otherwise).
z5746
<5746> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 360
Bethsaida. 966
{0966} Prime
Βηθσαϊδά[ν]
Bethsaida
{bayth-sahee-dah'}
Of Chaldee origin (compare [H1004] and [H6719]); fishing house; Bethsaida, a place in Palestine.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Luke 9:10-17

_ _ Luke 9:10-17. On the return of the twelve Jesus retires with them to Bethsaida, and there miraculously feeds five thousand.

_ _ (See on Mark 6:31-44).

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Luke 9:10-17

_ _ We have here, I. The account which the twelve gave their Master of the success of their ministry. They were not long out; but, when they returned, they told him all that they had done, as became servants who were sent on an errand. They told him what they had done, that, if they had done any thing amiss, they might mend it next time.

_ _ II. Their retirement, for a little breathing: He took them, and went aside privately into a desert place, that they might have some relaxation from business and not be always upon the stretch. Note, He that hath appointed our man-servant and maid-servant to rest would have his servants to rest too. Those in the most public stations, and that are most publicly useful, must sometimes go aside privately, both for the repose of their bodies, to recruit them, and for the furnishing of their minds by meditation for further public work.

_ _ III. The resort of the people to him, and the kind reception he gave them. They followed him, though it was into a desert place; for that is no desert where Christ is. And, though they hereby disturbed the repose he designed here for himself and his disciples, yet he welcomed them, Luke 9:11. Note, Pious zeal may excuse a little rudeness; it did with Christ, and should with us. Though they came unseasonably, yet Christ gave them what they came for. 1. He spoke unto them of the kingdom of God, the laws of that kingdom with which they must be bound, and the privileges of that kingdom with which they might be blessed. 2. He healed them that had need of healing, and, in a sense of their need, made their application to him. Though the disease was ever so inveterate, and incurable by the physicians, though the patients were ever so poor and mean, yet Christ healed them. There is healing in Christ for all that need it, whether for soul or body. Christ hath still a power over bodily diseases, and heals his people that need healing. Sometimes he sees that we need the sickness for the good of our souls, more than the healing for the ease of our bodies, and then we must be willing for a season, because there is need, to be in heaviness; but, when he sees that we need healing, we shall have it. Death is his servant, to heal the saints of all diseases. He heals spiritual maladies by his graces, by his comforts, and has for each what the case calls for; relief for every exigence.

_ _ IV. The plentiful provision Christ made for the multitude that attended him. With five loaves of bread, and two fishes, he fed five thousand men. This narrative we had twice before, and shall meet with it again; it is the only miracle of our Saviour's that is recorded by all the four evangelists. Let us only observe out of it, 1. Those who diligently attend upon Christ in the way of duty, and therein deny or expose themselves, or are made to forget themselves and their outward conveniences by their zeal for God's house, are taken under his particular care, and may depend upon Jehovah-jireh — The Lord will provide. He will not see those that fear him, and serve him faithfully, want any good thing. 2. Our Lord Jesus was of a free and generous spirit. His disciples said, Send them away, that they may get victuals; but Christ said, “No, give ye them to eat; let what we have go as far as it will reach, and they are welcome to it.” Thus he has taught both ministers and Christians to use hospitality without grudging, 1 Peter 4:9. Those that have but a little, let them do what they can with that little, and that is the way to make it more. There is that scatters, and yet increases. 3. Jesus Christ has not only physic, but food, for all those that by faith apply themselves to him; he not only heals them that need healing, cures the diseases of the soul, but feeds them too that need feeding, supports the spiritual life, relieves the necessities of it, and satisfies the desires of it. Christ has provided not only to save the soul from perishing by its diseases, but to nourish the soul unto life eternal, and strengthen it for all spiritual exercises. 4. All the gifts of Christ are to be received by the church in a regular orderly manner; Make them sit down by fifties in a company, Luke 9:14. Notice is here taken of the number of each company which Christ appointed for the better distribution of the meat and the easier computation of the number of the guests. 5. When we are receiving our creature-comforts, we must look up to heaven. Christ did so, to teach us to do so. We must acknowledge that we receive them from God, and that we are unworthy to receive them, — that we owe them all, and all the comfort we have in them, to the mediation of Christ, by whom the curse is removed, and the covenant of peace settled, — that we depend upon God's blessing upon them to make them serviceable to us, and desire that blessing. 6. The blessing of Christ will make a little go a great way. The little that the righteous man has is better than the riches of many wicked, a dinner of herbs better than a stalled ox. 7. Those whom Christ feeds he fills; to whom he gives, he gives enough; as there is in him enough for all, so there is enough for each. He replenishes every hungry soul, abundantly satisfies it with the goodness of his house. Here were fragments taken up, to assure us that in our Father's house there is bread enough, and to spare. We are not straitened, or stinted, in him.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Luke 9:10

Mark 6:30.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Luke 9:10

(3) And the apostles, when they were returned, told him all that they had done. And he took them, and went aside privately into a (c) desert place belonging to the city called Bethsaida.

(3) They that follow Christ will lack nothing, not even in the wilderness.

(c) The word signifies a desert: note, this was not in the town Bethsaida, but part of the fields belonging to the town.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
the apostles:

Luke 10:17 And the seventy returned again with joy, saying, Lord, even the devils are subject unto us through thy name.
Zechariah 1:10 And the man that stood among the myrtle trees answered and said, These [are they] whom the LORD hath sent to walk to and fro through the earth.
Mark 6:30 And the apostles gathered themselves together unto Jesus, and told him all things, both what they had done, and what they had taught.
Hebrews 13:17 Obey them that have the rule over you, and submit yourselves: for they watch for your souls, as they that must give account, that they may do it with joy, and not with grief: for that [is] unprofitable for you.

he took:

Matthew 14:13 When Jesus heard [of it], he departed thence by ship into a desert place apart: and when the people had heard [thereof], they followed him on foot out of the cities.
Mark 2:7 Why doth this [man] thus speak blasphemies? who can forgive sins but God only?
Mark 6:31-32 And he said unto them, Come ye yourselves apart into a desert place, and rest a while: for there were many coming and going, and they had no leisure so much as to eat. ... And they departed into a desert place by ship privately.

Bethsaida:

Matthew 11:21 Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works, which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.
Mark 6:45 And straightway he constrained his disciples to get into the ship, and to go to the other side before unto Bethsaida, while he sent away the people.
John 1:44 Now Philip was of Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter.
Random Bible VersesNew Quotes



Chain-Reference Bible Search

Zc 1:10. Mt 11:21; 14:13. Mk 2:7; 6:30, 31, 45. Lk 10:17. Jn 1:44. He 13:17.

Newest Chat Bible Comment
Comment HereComplete Biblical ResearchComplete Chat Bible Commentary
Please post your comment on Luke 9:10.
Name:

WWW Chat Bible Commentary

User-Posted Comments on Luke 9:10


Recent Chat Bible Comments