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Luke 22:39 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And he came out, and went, as his custom was, unto the mount of Olives; and the disciples also followed him.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And he came out, and went, as he was wont, to the mount of Olives; and his disciples also followed him.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— And He came out and proceeded as was His custom to the Mount of Olives; and the disciples also followed Him.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And he came out, and went, as he was wont, to the mount of Olives; and his disciples also followed him.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And going forth he went according to his custom to the mount of Olives, and the disciples also followed him.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And going out, he went, according to his custom, unto the Mount of Olives; and the disciples [also] followed him.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And having gone forth, he went on, according to custom, to the mount of the Olives, and his disciples also followed him,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And going out, he went, according to his custom, to the Mount of Olives. And his disciples also followed him.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And he came out, and went, as hee was wont, to the mount of Oliues, and his disciples also followed him.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And he came forth, and went, as he was used, to the mount of the Place of Olives; and his disciples also went after him.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And he went out, and proceeded, as was his custom, to the mount of the place of Olives; and his disciples followed him.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
he came out, 1831
{1831} Prime
ἐξέρχομαι
exerchomai
{ex-er'-khom-ahee}
From G1537 and G2064; to issue (literally or figuratively).
z5631
<5631> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 889
and went, 4198
{4198} Prime
πορεύομαι
poreuomai
{por-yoo'-om-ahee}
Middle voice from a derivative of the same as G3984; to traverse, that is, travel (literally or figuratively; especially to remove [figuratively die], live, etc.).
z5675
<5675> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Passive Deponent (See G5789)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 79
as y2596
[2596] Standard
κατά
kata
{kat-ah'}
A primary particle; (preposition) down (in place or time), in varied relations (according to the case [genitive, dative or accusative] with which it is joined).
he was wont, 1485
{1485} Prime
ἔθος
ethos
{eth'-os}
From G1486; a usage (prescribed by habit or law).
x2596
(2596) Complement
κατά
kata
{kat-ah'}
A primary particle; (preposition) down (in place or time), in varied relations (according to the case [genitive, dative or accusative] with which it is joined).
to 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
mount 3735
{3735} Prime
ὄρος
oros
{or'-os}
Probably from an obsolete word ὄρω [[oro]] (to rise or 'rear'; perhaps akin to G0142; compare G3733); a mountain (as lifting itself above the plain).
of Olives; 1636
{1636} Prime
ἐλαία
elaia
{el-ah'-yah}
Feminine of a presumed derivative from an obsolete primary; an olive (the tree or the fruit).
and 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
his 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
disciples 3101
{3101} Prime
μαθητής
mathetes
{math-ay-tes'}
From G3129; a learner, that is, pupil.
also 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
followed 190
{0190} Prime
ἀκολουθέω
akoloutheo
{ak-ol-oo-theh'-o}
From G0001 (as a particle of union) and κέλευθος [[keleuthos]] (a road); properly to be in the same way with, that is, to accompany (specifically as a disciple).
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
him. 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Luke 22:39

_ _ Luke 22:39-46. Agony in the garden.

_ _ as ... wont — (See John 18:2).

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Luke 22:39-46

_ _ We have here the awful story of Christ's agony in the garden, just before he was betrayed, which was largely related by the other evangelists. In it Christ accommodated himself to that part of his undertaking which he was now entering upon — the making of his soul an offering for sin. He afflicted his own soul with grief for the sin he was to satisfy for, and an apprehension of the wrath of God to which man had by sin made himself obnoxious, which he was pleased as a sacrifice to admit the impressions of, the consuming of a sacrifice with fire from heaven being the surest token of its acceptance. In it Christ entered the lists with the powers of darkness, gave them all the advantages they could desire, and yet conquered them.

_ _ I. What we have in this passage which we had before is, 1. That when Christ went out, though it was in the night, and a long walk, his disciples (eleven of them, for Judas had given them the slip) followed him. Having continued with him hitherto in his temptations, they would not leave him now. 2. That he went to the place where he was wont to be private, which intimates that Christ accustomed himself to retirement, was often alone, to teach us to be so, for freedom of converse with God and our own hearts. Though Christ had no conveniency for retirement but a garden, yet he retired. This should particularly be our practice after we have been at the Lord's table; we have then work to do which requires us to be private. 3. That he exhorted his disciples to pray that, though the approaching trial could not be avoided, yet they might not in it enter into temptation to sin; that, when they were in the greatest fright and danger, yet they might not have any inclination to desert Christ, nor take a step towards it: “Pray that you may be kept from sin.” 4. That he withdrew from them, and prayed himself; they had their errands at the throne of grace, and he had his, and therefore it was fit that they should pray separately, as sometimes, when they had joint errands, they prayed together. He withdrew about a stone's cast further into the garden, which some reckon about fifty of sixty paces, and there he kneeled down (so it is here) upon the bare ground; but the other evangelists say that afterwards he fell on his face, and there prayed that, if it were the will of God, this cup of suffering, this bitter cup, might be removed from him. This was the language of that innocent dread of suffering which, being really and truly man, he could not but have in his nature. 5. That he, knowing it to be his Father's will that he should suffer and die, and that, as the matter was now settled, it was necessary for our redemption and salvation, presently withdrew that petition, did not insist upon it, but resigned himself to his heavenly Father's will: “Nevertheless not my will be done, not the will of my human nature, but the will of God as it is written concerning me in the volume of the book, which I delight to do, let that be done,” Psalms 40:7, Psalms 40:8. 6. That his disciples were asleep when he was at prayer, and when they should have been themselves praying, Luke 22:45. When he rose from prayer, he found them sleeping, unconcerned in his sorrows; but see what a favourable construction is here put upon it, which we had not in the other evangelists — they were sleeping for sorrow. The great sorrow they were in upon the mournful farewells their Master had been this evening giving them had exhausted their spirits, and made them very dull and heavy, which (it being now late) disposed them to sleep. This teaches us to make the best of our brethren's infirmities, and, if there be one cause better than another, charitably impute them to that. 7. That when he awoke them, then he exhorted them to pray (Luke 22:46): “Why sleep ye? Why do you allow yourselves to sleep? Rise and pray. Shake off your drowsiness, that you may be fit to pray, and pray for grace, that you may be able to shake off your drowsiness.” This was like the ship-master's call to Jonah in a storm (Jonah 1:6): Arise, call upon thy God. When we find ourselves either by our outward circumstances or our inward dispositions entering into temptation, it concerns us to rise and pray, Lord, help me in this time of need. But,

_ _ II. There are three things in this passage which we had not in the other evangelists: —

_ _ 1. That, when Christ was in his agony, there appeared to him an angel from heaven, strengthening him, Luke 22:43. (1.) It was an instance of the deep humiliation of our Lord Jesus that he needed the assistance of an angel, and would admit it. The influence of the divine nature withdrew for the present, and then, as to his human nature, he was for a little while lower than the angels, and was capable of receiving help from them. (2.) When he was not delivered from his sufferings, yet he was strengthened and supported under them, and that was equivalent. If God proportion the shoulders to the burden, we shall have no reason to complain, whatever he is pleased to lay upon us. David owns this a sufficient answer to his prayer, in the day of trouble, that God strengthened him with strength in his soul, and so does the son of David, Psalms 138:3. (3.) The angels ministered to the Lord Jesus in his sufferings. He could have had legions of them to rescue him; nay, this one could have done it, could have chased and conquered the whole band of men that came to take him; but he made use of his ministration only to strengthen him; and the very visit which this angel made him now in his grief, when his enemies were awake and his friends asleep, was such a seasonable token of the divine favour as would be a very great strengthening to him. Yet this was not all: he probably said something to him to strengthen him; put him in mind that his sufferings were in order to his Father's glory, to his own glory, and to the salvation of those that were given him, represented to him the joy set before him, the seed he should see; with these and the like suggestions he encouraged him to go on cheerfully; and what is comforting is strengthening. Perhaps he did something to strengthen him, wiped away his sweat and tears, perhaps ministered some cordial to him, as after his temptation, or, it may be, took him by the arm, and helped him off the ground, or bore him up when he was ready to faint away; and in these services of the angel the Holy Spirit was enischun autonputting strength into him; for so the word signifies. It pleased the Lord to bruise him indeed; yet did he plead against him with his great power? No, but he put strength in him (Job 23:6), as he had promised, Psalms 89:21; Isaiah 49:8; Isaiah 50:7.

_ _ 2. That, being in an agony, he prayed more earnestly, Luke 22:44. As his sorrow and trouble grew upon him, he grew more importunate in prayer; not that there was before any coldness or indifferency in his prayers, but there was now a greater vehemency in them, which was expressed in his voice and gesture. Note, Prayer, though never out of season, is in a special manner seasonable when we are in an agony; and the stronger our agonies are the more lively and frequent our prayers should be. Now it was that Christ offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears, and was heard in that he feared (Hebrews 5:7), and in his fear wrestled, as Jacob with the angel.

_ _ 3. That, in this agony, his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground. Sweat came in with sin, and was a branch of the curse, Genesis 3:19. And therefore, when Christ was made sin and a curse for us, he underwent a grievous sweat, that in the sweat of his face we might eat bread, and that he might sanctify and sweeten all our trials to us. There is some dispute among the critics whether this sweat is only compared to drops of blood, being much thicker than drops of sweat commonly are, the pores of the body being more than ordinarily opened, or whether real blood out of the capillary veins mingled with it, so that it was in colour like blood, and might truly be called a bloody sweat; the matter is not great. Some reckon this one of the times when Christ shed his blood for us, for without the shedding of blood there is no remission. Every pore was as it were a bleeding wound, and his blood stained all his raiment. This showed the travail of his soul. He was now abroad in the open air, in a cool season, upon the cold ground, far in the night, which, one would think, had been enough to strike in a sweat; yet now he breaks out into a sweat, which bespeaks the extremity of the agony he was in.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Luke 22:39

Matthew 26:30.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

[[no comment]]

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
he came:

Matthew 26:36-38 Then cometh Jesus with them unto a place called Gethsemane, and saith unto the disciples, Sit ye here, while I go and pray yonder. ... Then saith he unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death: tarry ye here, and watch with me.
Mark 14:32-34 And they came to a place which was named Gethsemane: and he saith to his disciples, Sit ye here, while I shall pray. ... And saith unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death: tarry ye here, and watch.
John 18:1-2 When Jesus had spoken these words, he went forth with his disciples over the brook Cedron, where was a garden, into the which he entered, and his disciples. ... And Judas also, which betrayed him, knew the place: for Jesus ofttimes resorted thither with his disciples.

as:

Luke 21:37 And in the day time he was teaching in the temple; and at night he went out, and abode in the mount that is called [the mount] of Olives.
Mark 11:11 And Jesus entered into Jerusalem, and into the temple: and when he had looked round about upon all things, and now the eventide was come, he went out unto Bethany with the twelve.
Mark 11:19 And when even was come, he went out of the city.
Mark 13:3 And as he sat upon the mount of Olives over against the temple, Peter and James and John and Andrew asked him privately,
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Mt 26:36. Mk 11:11, 19; 13:3; 14:32. Lk 21:37. Jn 18:1.

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