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Luke 20:9 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And he began to speak unto the people this parable: A man planted a vineyard, and let it out to husbandmen, and went into another country for a long time.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Then began he to speak to the people this parable; A certain man planted a vineyard, and let it forth to husbandmen, and went into a far country for a long time.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— And He began to tell the people this parable: “A man planted a vineyard and rented it out to vine-growers, and went on a journey for a long time.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Then he began to speak to the people this parable; A certain man planted a vineyard, and let it to husbandmen, and went into a far country for a long time.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And he began to speak to the people this parable: A man planted a vineyard and let it out to husbandmen, and left the country for a long time.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And he began, unto the people, to be speaking this parable:—A man, planted a vineyard, and let it out to husbandmen, and went from home for a long time.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And he began to speak unto the people this simile: 'A certain man planted a vineyard, and gave it out to husbandmen, and went abroad for a long time,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And he began to speak to the people this parable: A certain man planted a vineyard and let it out to husbandmen: and he was abroad for a long time.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Then began hee to speake to the people this parable: A certaine man planted a vineyard, and let it foorth to husbandmen, and went into a farre countrey for a long time.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And he began to speak to the people this parable: A certain man planted a vinery, and let it to husbandmen, and removed for a great time.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And he began to utter this similitude to the people: A certain man planted a vineyard, and leased it to cultivators, and went abroad for a long time.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Then 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
began x756
(0756) Complement
ἄρχομαι
archomai
{ar'-khom-ahee}
Middle voice of G0757 (through the implication of precedence); to commence (in order of time).
he y756
[0756] Standard
ἄρχομαι
archomai
{ar'-khom-ahee}
Middle voice of G0757 (through the implication of precedence); to commence (in order of time).
z5662
<5662> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Middle Deponent (See G5788)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 352
to speak 3004
{3004} Prime
λέγω
lego
{leg'-o}
A primary verb; properly to 'lay' forth, that is, (figuratively) relate (in words [usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas G2036 and G5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while G4483 is properly to break silence merely, and G2980 means an extended or random harangue]); by implication to mean.
z5721
<5721> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 647
to 4314
{4314} Prime
πρός
pros
{pros}
A strengthened form of G4253; a preposition of direction; forward to, that is, toward (with the genitive case the side of, that is, pertaining to; with the dative case by the side of, that is, near to; usually with the accusative case the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, that is, whither or for which it is predicated).
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
people 2992
{2992} Prime
λαός
laos
{lah-os'}
Apparently a primary word; a people (in general; thus differing from G1218, which denotes one's own populace).
this 5026
{5026} Prime
ταύτῃ
taute
{tow'-tay}
Dative, accusative and genitive case respectively of the feminine singular of G3778; (towards or of) this.
parable; 3850
{3850} Prime
παραβολή
parabole
{par-ab-ol-ay'}
From G3846; a similitude ('parable'), that is, (symbolically) fictitious narrative (of common life conveying a moral), apoth gm or adage.
A certain 5100
{5100} Prime
τὶς
tis
{tis}
An enclitic indefinite pronoun; some or any person or object.
man 444
{0444} Prime
ἄνθρωπος
anthropos
{anth'-ro-pos}
From G0435 and ὤψ [[ops]] (the countenance; from G3700); manfaced, that is, a human being.
planted 5452
{5452} Prime
φυτεύω
phuteuo
{foot-yoo'-o}
From a derivative of G5453; to set out in the earth, that is, implant. Figuratively to instil doctrine.
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
a vineyard, 290
{0290} Prime
ἀμπελών
ampelon
{am-pel-ohn'}
From G0288; a vineyard.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
let y1554
[1554] Standard
ἐκδίδωμι
ekdidomi
{ek-did-o'-mee}
From G1537 and G1325; to give forth, that is, (specifically) to lease.
z0
<0000> Grammar
The original word in the Greek or Hebrew is translated by more than one word in the English. The English translation is separated by one or more other words from the original.
it y846
[0846] Standard
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
forth 1554
{1554} Prime
ἐκδίδωμι
ekdidomi
{ek-did-o'-mee}
From G1537 and G1325; to give forth, that is, (specifically) to lease.
z5639
<5639> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Middle (See G5785)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 65
x846
(0846) Complement
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
to husbandmen, 1092
{1092} Prime
γεωργός
georgos
{gheh-ore-gos'}
From G1093 and the base of G2041; a land worker, that is, farmer.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
went into a far country 589
{0589} Prime
ἀποδημέω
apodemeo
{ap-od-ay-meh'-o}
From G0590; to go abroad, that is, visit a foreign land.
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
for a long 2425
{2425} Prime
ἱκανός
hikanos
{hik-an-os'}
From ἵκω [[hiko]] (ἱκάνω [[hikano]] or ἱκνέομαι [[hikneomai]]; akin to G2240; to arrive); competent (as if coming in season), that is, ample (in amount) or fit (in character).
time. 5550
{5550} Prime
χρόνος
chronos
{khron'-os}
Of uncertain derivation; a space of time (in genitive case, and thus properly distinguished from G2540, which designates a fixed or special occasion; and from G0165, which denotes a particular period) or interval; by extension an individual opportunity; by implication delay.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Luke 20:9-13

_ _ vineyard — (See on Luke 13:6). In Matthew 21:33 additional points are given, taken literally from Isaiah 5:2, to fix down the application and sustain it by Old Testament authority.

_ _ husbandmen — the ordinary spiritual guides of the people, under whose care and culture the fruits of righteousness might be yielded.

_ _ went, etc. — leaving it to the laws of the spiritual husbandry during the whole length of the Jewish economy. (See on Mark 4:26.)

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Luke 20:9-19

_ _ Christ spoke this parable against those who were resolved not to own his authority, though the evidence of it was ever so full and convincing; and it comes very seasonably to show that by questioning his authority they forfeited their own. Their disowning the lord of their vineyard was a defeasance of their lease of the vineyard, and giving up of all their title.

_ _ I. The parable has nothing added here to what we had before in Matthew and Mark. The scope of it is to show that the Jewish nation, by persecuting the prophets, and at length Christ himself, had provoked God to take away from them all their church privileges, and to abandon them to ruin. It teaches us, 1. That those who enjoy the privileges of the visible church are as tenants and farmers that have a vineyard to look after, and rent to pay for it. God, by setting up revealed religion and instituted orders in the world, hath planted a vineyard, which he lets out to those people among whom his tabernacle is, Luke 20:9. And they have vineyard-work to do, needful and constant work, but pleasant and profitable. Whereas man was, for sin, condemned to till the ground, they that have a place in the church are restored to that which was Adam's work in innocency, to dress the garden, and to keep it; for the church is a paradise, and Christ the tree of life in it. They have also vineyard-fruits to present to the Lord of the vineyard. There are rents to be paid and services to be done, which, though bearing no proportion to the value of the premises, yet must be done and must be paid. 2. That the work of God's ministers is to call upon those who enjoy the privileges of the church to bring forth fruit accordingly. They are God's rent-gatherers, to put the husbandmen in mind of their arrears, or rather to put them in mind that they have a landlord who expects to hear from them, and to receive some acknowledgment of their dependence on him, and obligations to him, Luke 20:10. The Old Testament prophets were sent on this errand to the Jewish church, to demand from them the duty and obedience they owed to God. 3. That it has often been the lot of God's faithful servants to be wretchedly abused by his own tenants; they have been beaten and treated shamefully by those that resolved to send them empty away. They that are resolved not to do their duty to God cannot bear to be called upon to do it. Some of the best men in the world have had the hardest usage from it, for their best services. 4. That God sent his Son into the world to carry on the same work that the prophets were employed in, to gather the fruits of the vineyard for God; and one would have thought that he would have been reverenced and received. The prophets spoke as servants, Thus saith the Lord; but Christ as a Son, among his own, Verily, I say unto you. Putting such an honour as this upon them, to send him, one would have thought, should have won upon them. 5. That those who reject Christ's ministers would reject Christ himself if he should come to them; for it has been tried, and found that the persecutors and murderers of his servants the prophets were the persecutors and murderers of himself. They said, This is the heir, come let us kill him. When they slew the servants, there were other servants sent. “But, if we can but be the death of the son, there is never another son to be sent, and then we shall be no longer molested with these demands; we may have a quiet possession of the vineyard for ourselves.” The scribes and Pharisees promised themselves that, if they could but get Christ out of the way, they should for ever ride masters in the Jewish church; and therefore they took the bold step, they cast him out of the vineyard, and killed him. 6. That the putting of Christ to death filled up the measure of the Jewish iniquity, and brought upon them ruin without remedy. No other could be expected than that God should destroy those wicked husbandmen. They began in not paying their rent, but then proceeded to beat and kill the servants, and at length their young Master himself. Note, Those that live in the neglect of their duty to God know not what degrees of sin and destruction they are running themselves into.

_ _ II. To the application of the parable is added here, which we had not before, their deprecation of the doom included in it (Luke 20:16): When they heart it, they said, God forbid, M genoitoLet not this be done, so it should be read. Though they could not but own that for such a sin such a punishment was just, and what might be expected, yet they could not bear to hear of it. Note, It is an instance of the folly and stupidity of sinners that they proceed and persevere in their sinful ways though at the same time they have a foresight and dread of the destruction that is at the end of those ways. And see what a cheat they put themselves, to think to avoid it by a cold God forbid, when they do nothing towards the preventing of it; but will this make the threatening of no effect? No, they shall know whose word shall stand, God's or theirs. Now observe what Christ said, in answer to this childish deprecation of their ruin. 1. He beheld them. This is taken notice of only by this evangelist, Luke 20:17. He looked upon them with pity and compassion, grieved to see them cheat themselves thus to their own ruin. He beheld them, to see if they would blush at their own folly, or if he could discern in their countenances any indication of relenting. 2. He referred them to the scripture: “What is this then that is written? How can you escape the judgment of God, when you cannot prevent the exaltation of him whom you despise and reject? The word of God hath said it, that the stone which the builders rejected is become the head of the corner.” The Lord Jesus will be exalted to the Father's right hand. He has all judgment and all power committed to him; he is the corner-stone and top-stone of the church, and, if so, his enemies can expect no other than to be destroyed. Even those that slight him, that stumble at him, and are offended in him, shall be broken — it will be their ruin; but as to those that not only reject him, but hate and persecute him, as the Jews did, he will fall upon them and crush them to pieces — will grind them to powder. The condemnation of spiteful persecutors will be much sorer than that of careless unbelievers.

_ _ Lastly, We are told how the chief priests and scribes were exasperated by this parable (Luke 20:19): They perceived that he had spoken this parable against them; and so he had. A guilty conscience needs no accuser; but they, instead of yielding to the convictions of conscience, fell into a rage at him who awakened that sleeping lion in their bosoms, and sought to lay hands on him. Their corruptions rebelled against their convictions, and got the victory. And it was not because they had any fear of God or of his wrath before their eyes, but only because they feared the people, that they did not now fly in his face, and take him by the throat. They were just ready to make his words good: This is the heir, come let us kill him. Note, When the hearts of the sons of men are fully set in them to do evil, the fairest warnings both of the sin they are about to commit and of the consequences of it make no impression upon them. Christ tells them that instead of kissing the Son of God they would kill him, upon which they should have said, What, is thy servant a dog? But they do, in effect, say this: “And so we will; have at him now.” And, though they deprecate the punishment of the sin, in the next breath they are projecting the commission of it.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Luke 20:9

A long time — It was a long time from the entrance of the Israelites into Canaan to the birth of Christ. Matthew 21:33; Mark 12:1.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Luke 20:9

(2) Then began he to speak to the people this parable; A certain man planted a vineyard, and let it forth to husbandmen, and went into a far country for a long time.

(2) It is nothing new for those who are knowledgable of the very sanctuary of God's holy place to be the greatest enemies of Christ, but in due time they will be punished.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
this:

Matthew 21:33-46 Hear another parable: There was a certain householder, which planted a vineyard, and hedged it round about, and digged a winepress in it, and built a tower, and let it out to husbandmen, and went into a far country: ... But when they sought to lay hands on him, they feared the multitude, because they took him for a prophet.
Mark 12:1-12 And he began to speak unto them by parables. A [certain] man planted a vineyard, and set an hedge about [it], and digged [a place for] the winefat, and built a tower, and let it out to husbandmen, and went into a far country. ... And they sought to lay hold on him, but feared the people: for they knew that he had spoken the parable against them: and they left him, and went their way.

planted:

Psalms 80:8-14 Thou hast brought a vine out of Egypt: thou hast cast out the heathen, and planted it. ... Return, we beseech thee, O God of hosts: look down from heaven, and behold, and visit this vine;
Isaiah 5:1-7 Now will I sing to my wellbeloved a song of my beloved touching his vineyard. My wellbeloved hath a vineyard in a very fruitful hill: ... For the vineyard of the LORD of hosts [is] the house of Israel, and the men of Judah his pleasant plant: and he looked for judgment, but behold oppression; for righteousness, but behold a cry.
Jeremiah 2:21 Yet I had planted thee a noble vine, wholly a right seed: how then art thou turned into the degenerate plant of a strange vine unto me?
John 15:1-8 I am the true vine, and my Father is the husbandman. ... Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit; so shall ye be my disciples.
1 Corinthians 3:6-9 I have planted, Apollos watered; but God gave the increase. ... For we are labourers together with God: ye are God's husbandry, [ye are] God's building.

and let:

Song of Songs 8:11-12 Solomon had a vineyard at Baalhamon; he let out the vineyard unto keepers; every one for the fruit thereof was to bring a thousand [pieces] of silver. ... My vineyard, which [is] mine, [is] before me: thou, O Solomon, [must have] a thousand, and those that keep the fruit thereof two hundred.

husbandmen:

Deuteronomy 1:15-18 So I took the chief of your tribes, wise men, and known, and made them heads over you, captains over thousands, and captains over hundreds, and captains over fifties, and captains over tens, and officers among your tribes. ... And I commanded you at that time all the things which ye should do.
Deuteronomy 16:18 Judges and officers shalt thou make thee in all thy gates, which the LORD thy God giveth thee, throughout thy tribes: and they shall judge the people with just judgment.
Deuteronomy 17:8-15 If there arise a matter too hard for thee in judgment, between blood and blood, between plea and plea, and between stroke and stroke, [being] matters of controversy within thy gates: then shalt thou arise, and get thee up into the place which the LORD thy God shall choose; ... Thou shalt in any wise set [him] king over thee, whom the LORD thy God shall choose: [one] from among thy brethren shalt thou set king over thee: thou mayest not set a stranger over thee, which [is] not thy brother.

went:

Luke 19:12 He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.
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Dt 1:15; 16:18; 17:8. Ps 80:8. So 8:11. Is 5:1. Jr 2:21. Mt 21:33. Mk 12:1. Lk 19:12. Jn 15:1. 1Co 3:6.

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