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Luke 17:11 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And it came to pass, as they were on their way to Jerusalem, that he was passing along the borders of Samaria and Galilee.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And it came to pass, as he went to Jerusalem, that he passed through the midst of Samaria and Galilee.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— While He was on the way to Jerusalem, He was passing between Samaria and Galilee.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And it came to pass, as he went to Jerusalem, that he passed through the midst of Samaria and Galilee.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And it came to pass as he was going up to Jerusalem, that he passed through the midst of Samaria and Galilee.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And it came to pass, during the journey unto Jerusalem, that, he, was going through the midst of Samaria and Galilee.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And it came to pass, in his going on to Jerusalem, that he passed through the midst of Samaria and Galilee,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And it came to pass, as he was going to Jerusalem, he passed through the midst of Samaria and Galilee.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And it came to passe, as he went to Hierusalem, that hee passed thorow the mids of Samaria and Galile.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— AND it was that as Jeshu was going to Urishlem, he passed among the Shomroyee from Galila.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And it occurred as Jesus advanced towards Jerusalem, that he passed among the Samaritans into Galilee.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
it came to pass, 1096
{1096} Prime
γίνομαι
ginomai
{ghin'-om-ahee}
A prolonged and middle form of a primary verb; to cause to be ('gen' -erate), that is, (reflexively) to become (come into being), used with great latitude (literally, figuratively, intensively, etc.).
z5633
<5633> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Middle Deponent (See G5788)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 260
as y1722
[1722] Standard
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
he 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
went 4198
{4198} Prime
πορεύομαι
poreuomai
{por-yoo'-om-ahee}
Middle voice from a derivative of the same as G3984; to traverse, that is, travel (literally or figuratively; especially to remove [figuratively die], live, etc.).
z5738
<5738> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 109
to 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
Jerusalem, 2419
{2419} Prime
Ἰερουσαλήμ
Hierousalem
{hee-er-oo-sal-ame'}
Of Hebrew origin [H3389]; Hierusalem (that is, Jerushalem), the capital of Palestine.
that 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
he 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
passed 1330
{1330} Prime
διέρχομαι
dierchomai
{dee-er'-khom-ahee}
From G1223 and G2064; to traverse (literally).
z5711
<5711> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 184
through 1223
{1223} Prime
διά
dia
{dee-ah'}
A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through (in very wide applications, local, causal or occasional). In composition it retains the same general import.
the midst 3319
{3319} Prime
μέσος
mesos
{mes'-os}
From G3326; middle (as adjective or [neuter] noun).
of Samaria 4540
{4540} Prime
Σαμάρεια
Samareia
{sam-ar'-i-ah}
Of Hebrew origin [H8111]; Samaria (that is, Shomeron), a city and region of Palestine.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
Galilee. 1056
{1056} Prime
Γαλιλαία
Galilaia
{gal-il-ah'-yah}
Of hebrew origin [H1551]; Galilaea (that is, the heathen circle), a region of Palestine.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Luke 17:11-13

_ _ Luke 17:11-19. Ten lepers cleansed.

_ _ through the midst of Samaria and Galilee — probably on the confines of both.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Luke 17:11-19

_ _ We have here an account of the cure of ten lepers, which we had not in any other of the evangelists. The leprosy was a disease which the Jews supposed to be inflicted for the punishment of some particular sin, and to be, more than other diseases, a mark of God's displeasure; and therefore Christ, who came to take away sin, and turn away wrath, took particular care to cleanse the lepers that fell in his way. Christ was now in his way to Jerusalem, about the mid-way, where he had little acquaintance in comparison with what he had either at Jerusalem or in Galilee. He was now in the frontier-country, the marches that lay between Samaria and Galilee. He went that road to find out these lepers, and to cure them; for he is found of them that sought him not. Observe,

_ _ I. The address of these lepers to Christ. They were ten in a company; for, though they were shut out from society with others, yet those that were infected were at liberty to converse with one another, which would be some comfort to them, as giving them an opportunity to compare notes, and to condole with one another. Now observe, 1. They met Christ as he entered into a certain village. They did not stay till he had refreshed himself for some time after the fatigue of his journey, but met him as he entered the town, weary as he was; and yet he did not put them off, nor adjourn their cause. 2. They stood afar off, knowing that by the law their disease obliged them to keep their distance. A sense of our spiritual leprosy should make us very humble in all our approaches to Christ. Who are we, that we should draw near to him that is infinitely pure? We are impure. 3. Their request was unanimous, and very importunate (Luke 17:13): They lifted up their voices, being at a distance, and cried, Jesus, Master, have mercy on us. those that expect help from Christ must take him for their Master, and be at his command. If he be Master, he will be Jesus, a Saviour, and not otherwise. They ask not in particular to be cured of their leprosy, but, Have mercy on us; and it is enough to refer ourselves to the compassions of Christ, for they fail not. They heard the fame of this Jesus (though he had not been much conversant in that country), and that was such as encouraged them to make application to him; and, if but one of them began in so cheap and easy an address, they would all join.

_ _ II. Christ sent them to the priest, to be inspected by him, who was the judge of the leprosy. He did not tell them positively that they should be cured, but bade them go show themselves to the priests, Luke 17:14. This was a trial of their obedience, and it was fit that it should be so tried, as Naaman's in a like case: Go wash in Jordan. Note, Those that expect Christ's favours must take them in his way and method. Some of these lepers perhaps would be ready to quarrel with the prescription: “Let him either cure or say that he will not, and not send us to the priests on a fool's errand;” but, over-ruled by the rest, they all went to the priest. As the ceremonial law was yet in force, Christ took care that it should be observed, and the reputation of it kept up, and due honour paid to the priests in things pertaining to their function; but, probably, he had here a further design, which was to have the priest's judgment of, and testimony to, the perfectness of the cure; and that the priest might be awakened, and others by him, to enquire after one that had such a commanding power over bodily diseases.

_ _ III. As they went, they were cleansed, and so became fit to be looked upon by the priest, and to have a certificate from him that they were clean. Observe, Then we may expect God to meet us with mercy when we are found in the way of duty. If we do what we can, God will not be wanting to do that for us which we cannot. Go, attend upon instituted ordinances; go and pray, and read the scriptures: Go show thyself to the priests; go and open thy case to a faithful minister, and, though the means will not heal thee of themselves, God will heal thee in the diligent use of those means.

_ _ IV. One of them, and but one, returned, to give thanks, Luke 17:15. When he saw that he was healed, instead of going forward to the priest, to be by him declared clean, and so discharged from his confinement, which was all that the rest aimed at, he turned back towards him who was the Author of his cure, whom he wished to have the glory of it, before he received the benefit of it. He appears to have been very hearty and affectionate in his thanksgivings: With a loud voice he glorified God, acknowledging it to come originally from him; and he lifted up his voice in his praises, as he had done in his prayers, Luke 17:13. Those that have received mercy from God should publish it to others, that they may praise God too, and may be encouraged by their experiences to trust in him. But he also made a particular address of thanks to Christ (Luke 17:16): He fell down at his feet, put himself into the most humble reverent posture he could, and gave him thanks. Note, We ought to give thanks for the favours Christ bestows upon us, and particularly for recoveries from sickness; and we ought to be speedy in our returns of praise, and not defer them, lest time wear out the sense of the mercy. It becomes us also to be very humble in our thanksgivings, as well as in our prayers. It becomes the seed of Jacob, like him, to own themselves less than the least of God's mercies, when they have received them, as well as when they are in pursuit of them.

_ _ V. Christ took notice of this one that had thus distinguished himself; for, it seems, he was a Samaritan, whereas the rest were Jews, Luke 17:16. The Samaritans were separatists from the Jewish church, and had not the pure knowledge and worship of God among them that the Jews had, and yet it was one of them that glorified God, when the Jews forgot, or, when it was moved to them, refused, to do it. Now observe here,

_ _ 1. The particular notice Christ took of him, of the grateful return he made, and the ingratitude of those that were sharers with him in the mercy — that he who was a stranger to the commonwealth of Israel was the only one that returned to give glory to God, Luke 17:17, Luke 17:18. See here, (1.) How rich Christ is in doing good: Were there not ten cleansed? Here was a cure by wholesale, a whole hospital healed with one word's speaking. Note, There is an abundance of healing cleansing virtue in the blood of Christ, sufficient for all his patients, though ever so many. Here are ten at a time cleansed; we shall have never the less grace for others sharing it. (2.) How poor we are in our returns: “Where are the nine? Why did not they return to give thanks?” This intimates that ingratitude is a very common sin. Of the many that receive mercy from God, there are but few, very few, that return to give thanks in a right manner (scarcely one in ten), that render according to the benefit done to them. (3.) How those often prove most grateful from whom it was least expected. A Samaritan gives thanks, and a Jew does not. Thus many who profess revealed religion are out-done, and quite shamed, by some that are governed only by natural religion, not only in moral value, but in piety and devotion. This serves here to aggravate the ingratitude of those Jews of whom Christ speaks, as taking it very ill that his kindness was so slighted. And it intimates how justly he resents the ingratitude of the world of mankind, for whom he had done so much, and from whom he has received so little.

_ _ 2. The great encouragement Christ gave him, Luke 17:19. The rest had their cure, and had it not revoked, as justly it might have been, for their ingratitude, though they had such a good example of gratitude set before them; but he had his cure confirmed particularly with an encomium: Thy faith hath made thee whole. The rest were made whole by the power of Christ, in compassion to their distress, and in answer to their prayer; but he was made whole by his faith, by which Christ saw him distinguished from the rest. Note, Temporal mercies are then doubled and sweetened to us when they are fetched in by the prayers of faith, and returned by the praises of faith.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

[[no comment]]

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Luke 17:11

(6) And it came to pass, as he went to Jerusalem, that he passed through the midst of Samaria and Galilee.

(6) Christ does good even to those who will be unthankful, but the benefits of God to salvation only profit those who are thankful.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance

Luke 9:51-52 And it came to pass, when the time was come that he should be received up, he stedfastly set his face to go to Jerusalem, ... And sent messengers before his face: and they went, and entered into a village of the Samaritans, to make ready for him.
John 4:4 And he must needs go through Samaria.
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Lk 9:51. Jn 4:4.

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