Parallel Bible VersionsHebrew Bible Study Tools

Job 2:11 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Now when Job's three friends heard of all this evil that was come upon him, they came every one from his own place: Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite, and they made an appointment together to come to bemoan him and to comfort him.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Now when Job's three friends heard of all this evil that was come upon him, they came every one from his own place; Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite: for they had made an appointment together to come to mourn with him and to comfort him.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Now when Job’s three friends heard of all this adversity that had come upon him, they came each one from his own place, Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite and Zophar the Naamathite; and they made an appointment together to come to sympathize with him and comfort him.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Now when Job's three friends heard of all this evil that had come upon him, they came every one from his own place; Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite; for they had made an appointment together to come to mourn with him, and to comfort him.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And three friends of Job heard of all this evil that was come upon him. And they came each one from his place: Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite; and they made an appointment together to come to condole with him and to comfort him.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Now when the three friends of Job heard of all this misfortune which had befallen him,—they came, every man from his own place, Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite,—for they had by appointment met together to come to shew sympathy with him, and to comfort him.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And three of the friends of Job hear of all this evil that hath come upon him, and they come in each from his place—Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite—and they are met together to come in to bemoan him, and to comfort him;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Now when Job's three friends heard all the evil that had befallen him, they came every one from his own place, Eliphaz, the Themanite, and Baldad, the Suhite, and Sophar, the Naamathite. For they had made an appointment to come together and visit him, and comfort him.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Now when Iobs three friends heard of all this euill, that was come vpon him, they came euery one from his owne place: Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite; for they had made an appointment together to come to mourne with him, and to comfort him.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— Now his three friends having heard of all the evil that was come upon him, came to him each from his own country: Eliphaz the king of the Thaemans, Baldad sovereign of the Saucheans, Sophar king of he Minaeans: and they came to him with one accord, to comfort and to visit him.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— Now when Iyyov's three friends heard of all this evil that was come upon him, they came every one from his own place; Elifaz the Temani, and Bildad the Shuchi, and Tzofar the Naamathi: for they had made an appointment together to come to mourn with him and to comfort him.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Now when Iyyv's אִיּוֹב 347
{0347} Prime
אִיּוֹב
'Iyowb
{ee-yobe'}
From H0340; hated (that is, persecuted); Ijob, the patriarch famous for his patience.
three 7969
{7969} Prime
שָׁלוֹשׁ
shalowsh
{shaw-loshe'}
The last two forms being masculine; a primitive number; three; occasionally (ordinal) third, or (multiplicative) thrice.
friends 7453
{7453} Prime
רֵעַ
rea`
{ray'-ah}
From H7462; an associate (more or less close).
heard 8085
{8085} Prime
שָׁמַע
shama`
{shaw-mah'}
A primitive root; to hear intelligently (often with implication of attention, obedience, etc.; causatively to tell, etc.).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
x853
(0853) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Apparently contracted from H0226 in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, even or namely).
of all x3605
(3605) Complement
כֹּל
kol
{kole}
From H3634; properly the whole; hence all, any or every (in the singular only, but often in a plural sense).
this x2063
(2063) Complement
זֹאת
zo'th
{zothe'}
Irregular feminine of H2089; this (often used adverbially).
evil 7451
{7451} Prime
רָע
ra`
{rah}
From H7489; bad or (as noun) evil (naturally or morally). This includes the second (feminine) form; as adjective or noun.
that was come 935
{0935} Prime
בּוֹא
bow'
{bo}
A primitive root; to go or come (in a wide variety of applications).
z8802
<8802> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Participle Active (See H8814)
Count - 5386
upon x5921
(5921) Complement
עַל
`al
{al}
Properly the same as H5920 used as a preposition (in the singular or plural, often with prefix, or as conjugation with a particle following); above, over, upon, or against (yet always in this last relation with a downward aspect) in a great variety of applications.
him, they came 935
{0935} Prime
בּוֹא
bow'
{bo}
A primitive root; to go or come (in a wide variety of applications).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
every one 376
{0376} Prime
אִישׁ
'iysh
{eesh}
Contracted for H0582 (or perhaps rather from an unused root meaning to be extant); a man as an individual or a male person; often used as an adjunct to a more definite term (and in such cases frequently not expressed in translation.).
from his own place; 4725
{4725} Prime
מָקוֹם
maqowm
{maw-kome'}
From H6965; properly a standing, that is, a spot; but used widely of a locality (generally or specifically); also (figuratively) of a condition (of body or mind).
x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
lfz אֱלִיפָז 464
{0464} Prime
אֱלִיפַז
'Eliyphaz
{el-ee-faz'}
From H0410 and H6337; God of gold; Eliphaz, the name of one of Job's friends, and of a son of Esau.
the Tmn תֵּימָנִי, 8489
{8489} Prime
תֵּימָנִי
Teymaniy
{tay-maw-nee'}
Patronymic from H8487; a Temanite or descendant of Teman.
and Bilda בִּלדַּד 1085
{1085} Prime
בִּלְדַּד
Bildad
{bil-dad'}
Of uncertain derivation; Bildad, one of Job's friends.
the שׁוּחִי, 7747
{7747} Prime
שׁוּחִי
Shuchiy
{shoo-khee'}
Patronymic from H7744; a Shuchite or descendant of Shuach.
and Xfar צוֹפַר 6691
{6691} Prime
צוֹפַר
Tsowphar
{tso-far'}
From H6852; departing; Tsophar, a friend of Job.
the Na`m נַעֲמָתִי: 5284
{5284} Prime
נַעֲמָתִי
Na`amathiy
{nah-am-aw-thee'}
Patrial from a place corresponding in nmae (but not identical) with H5279; a Naamathite, or inhabitant of Naamah.
for they had made an appointment 3259
{3259} Prime
יָעַד
ya`ad
{yaw-ad'}
A primitive root; to fix upon (by agreement or appointment); by implication to meet (at a stated time), to summon (to trial), to direct (in a certain quarter or position), to engage (for marriage).
z8735
<8735> Grammar
Stem - Niphal (See H8833)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 1602
together 3162
{3162} Prime
יַחַד
yachad
{yakh'-ad}
From H3161; properly a unit, that is, (adverbially) unitedly.
to come 935
{0935} Prime
בּוֹא
bow'
{bo}
A primitive root; to go or come (in a wide variety of applications).
z8800
<8800> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Infinitive (See H8812)
Count - 4888
to mourn 5110
{5110} Prime
נוּד
nuwd
{nood}
A primitive root; to nod, that is, waver; figuratively to wander, flee, disappear; also (from shaking the head in sympathy), to console, deplore, or (from tossing the head in scorn) taunt.
z8800
<8800> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Infinitive (See H8812)
Count - 4888
with him and to comfort 5162
{5162} Prime
נָחַם
nacham
{naw-kham'}
A primitive root; properly to sigh, that is, breathe strongly; by implication to be sorry, that is, (in a favorable sense) to pity, console or (reflexively) rue; or (unfavorably) to avenge (oneself).
z8763
<8763> Grammar
Stem - Piel (See H8840)
Mood - Infinitive (See H8812)
Count - 790
him.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Job 2:11

_ _ Eliphaz — The view of Rawlinson that “the names of Job’s three friends represent the Chaldean times, about 700 b.c.,” cannot be accepted. Eliphaz is an Idumean name, Esau’s oldest son (Genesis 36:4); and Teman, son of Eliphaz (Genesis 36:15), called “duke.” Eusebius places Teman in Arabia-Petraea (but see on Job 6:19). Teman means “at the right hand”; and then the south, namely, part of Idumea; capital of Edom (Amos 1:12). Hebrew geographers faced the east, not the north as we do; hence with them “the right hand” was the south. Temanites were famed for wisdom (Jeremiah 49:7). Baruch mentions them as “authors of fables” (namely, proverbs embodying the results of observation), and “searchers out of understanding.”

_ _ Bildad the Shuhite — Shuah (“a pit”), son of Abraham and Keturah (Genesis 25:2). Ptolemy mentions the region Syccea, in Arabia-Deserta, east of Batanea.

_ _ Zophar the Naamathite — not of the Naamans in Judah (Joshua 15:41), which was too distant; but some region in Arabia-Deserta. Fretelius says there was a Naamath in Uz.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Job 2:11-13

_ _ We have here an account of the kind visit which Job's three friends paid him in his affliction. The news of his extraordinary troubles spread into all parts, he being an eminent man both for greatness and goodness, and the circumstances of his troubles being very uncommon. Some, who were his enemies, triumphed in his calamities, Job 16:10; Job 19:18; Job 30:1, etc. Perhaps they made ballads on him. But his friends concerned themselves for him, and endeavoured to comfort him. A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity. Three of them are here named (Job 2:11), Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar. We shall afterwards meet with a fourth, who it should seem was present at the whole conference, namely, Elihu. Whether he came as a friend of Job or only as an auditor does not appear. These three are said to be his friends, his intimate acquaintance, as David and Solomon had each of them one in their court that was called the king's friend. These three were eminently wise and good men, as appears by their discourses. They were old men, very old, had a great reputation for knowledge, and much deference was paid to their judgment, Job 32:6. It is probable that they were men of figure in their country-princes, or heads of houses. Now observe,

_ _ I. That Job, in his prosperity, had contracted a friendship with them. If they were his equals, yet he had not that jealousy of them — if his inferiors, yet he had not that disdain of them, which was any hindrance to an intimate converse and correspondence with them. to have such friends added more to his happiness in the day of his prosperity than all the head of cattle he was master of. Much of the comfort of this life lies in acquaintance and friendship with those that are prudent and virtuous; and he that has a few such friends ought to value them highly. Job's three friends are supposed to have been all of them of the posterity of Abraham, which, for some descents, even in the families that were shut out from the covenant of peculiarity, retained some good fruits of that pious education which the father of the faithful gave to those under his charge. Eliphaz descended from Teman, the grandson of Esau (Genesis 36:11), Bildad (it is probable) from Shuah, Abraham's son by Keturah, Genesis 25:2. Zophar is thought by some to be the same with Zepho, a descendant from Esau, Genesis 26:11. The preserving of so much wisdom and piety among those that were strangers to the covenants of promise was a happy presage of God's grace to the Gentiles, when the partition-wall should in the latter days be taken down. Esau was rejected; yet many that came from him inherited some of the best blessings.

_ _ II. That they continued their friendship with Job in his adversity, when most of his friends had forsaken him, Job 19:14. In two ways they showed their friendship: —

_ _ 1. By the kind visit they paid him in his affliction, to mourn with him and to comfort him, Job 2:11. Probably they had been wont to visit him in his prosperity, not to hunt or hawk with him, not to dance or play at cards with him, but to entertain and edify themselves with his learned and pious converse; and now that he was in adversity they come to share with him in his griefs, as formerly they had come to share with him in his comforts. These were wise men, whose heart was in the house of mourning, Ecclesiastes 7:4. Visiting the afflicted, sick or sore, fatherless or childless, in their sorrow, is made a branch of pure religion and undefiled (James 1:27), and, if done from a good principle, will be abundantly recompensed shortly, Matthew 25:36.

_ _ (1.) By visiting the sons and daughters of affliction we may contribute to the improvement, [1.] Of our own graces; for many a good lesson is to be learned from the troubles of others; we may look upon them and receive instruction, and be made wise and serious. [2.] Of their comforts. By putting a respect upon them we encourage them, and some good word may be spoken to them which may help to make them easy. Job's friends came, not to satisfy their curiosity with an account of his troubles and the strangeness of the circumstances of them, much less, as David's false friends, to make invidious remarks upon him (Psalms 41:6-8), but to mourn with him, to mingle their tears with his, and so to comfort him. It is much more pleasant to visit those in affliction to whom comfort belongs than those to whom we must first speak conviction.

_ _ (2.) Concerning these visitants observe, [1.] That they were not sent for, but came of their own accord (Job 6:22), whence Mr. Caryl observes that it is good manners to be an unbidden guest at the house of mourning, and, in comforting our friends, to anticipate their invitations. [2.] That they made an appointment to come. Note, Good people should make appointments among themselves for doing good, so exciting and binding one another to it, and assisting and encouraging one another in it. For the carrying on of any pious design let hand join in hand. [3.] That they came with a design (and we have reason to think it was a sincere design) to comfort him, and yet proved miserable comforters, through their unskilful management of his case. Many that aim well do, by mistake, come short of their aim.

_ _ 2. By their tender sympathy with him and concern for him in his affliction. When they saw him at some distance he was so disfigured and deformed with his sores that they knew him not, Job 2:12. His face was foul with weeping (Job 16:16), like Jerusalem's Nazarites, which had been ruddy as the rubies, but were now blacker than a coal, Lamentations 4:7, Lamentations 4:8. What a change will a sore disease, or, without that, oppressing care and grief, make in the countenance, in a little time! Is this Naomi? Ruth 1:19. So, Is this Job? How hast thou fallen! How is thy glory stained and sullied, and all thy honour laid in the dust! God fits us for such changes! Observing him thus miserably altered, they did not leave him, in a fright or loathing, but expressed so much the more tenderness towards him. (1.) Coming to mourn with him, they vented their undissembled grief in all the then usual expressions of that passion. They wept aloud; the sight of them (as is usual) revived Job's grief, and set him a weeping afresh, which fetched floods of tears from their eyes. They rent their clothes, and sprinkled dust upon their heads, as men that would strip themselves, and abase themselves, with their friend that was stripped and abased. (2.) Coming to comfort him, they sat down with him upon the ground, for so he received visits; and they, not in compliment to him, but in true compassion, put themselves into the same humble and uneasy place and posture. They had many a time, it is likely, sat with him on his couches and at his table, in his prosperity, and were therefore willing to share with him in his grief and poverty because they had shared with him in his joy and plenty. It was not a modish short visit that they made him, just to look upon him and be gone; but, as those that could have had no enjoyment of themselves if they had returned to their place while their friend was in so much misery, they resolved to stay with him till they saw him mend or end, and therefore took lodgings near him, though he was not now able to entertain them as he had done, and they must therefore bear their own charges. Every day, for seven days together, at the house in which he admitted company, they came and sat with him, as his companions in tribulation, and exceptions from that rule, Nullus ad amissas ibit amicus opesThose who have lost their wealth are not to expect the visits of their friends. They sat with him, but none spoke a word to him, only they all attended to the particular narratives he gave of his troubles. They were silent, as men astonished and amazed. Curae leves loquuntur, ingentes stupentOur lighter griefs have a voice; those which are more oppressive are mute.

So long a time they held their peace, to show
A reverence due to such prodigious woe.
— Sir R. Blackmore

_ _ They spoke not a word to him, whatever they said one to another, by way of instruction, for the improvement of the present providence. They said nothing to that purport to which afterwards they said much — nothing to grieve him (Job 4:2), because they saw his grief was very great already, and they were loth at first to add affliction to the afflicted. There is a time to keep silence, when either the wicked is before us, and by speaking we may harden them (Psalms 39:1), or when by speaking we may offend the generation of God's children, Psalms 73:15. Their not entering upon the following solemn discourses till the seventh day may perhaps intimate that it was the sabbath day, which doubtless was observed in the patriarchal age, and to that day they adjourned the intended conference, because probably then company resorted, as usual, to Job's house, to join with him in his devotions, who might be edified by the discourse. Or, rather, by their silence so long they would intimate that what they afterwards said was well considered and digested and the result of many thoughts. The heart of the wise studies to answer. We should think twice before we speak once, especially in such a case as this, think long, and we shall be the better able to speak short and to the purpose.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Job 2:11

They — Who were persons eminent for birth and quality, for wisdom and knowledge, and for the profession of the true religion, being probably of the posterity of Abraham, a — kin to Job, and living in the same country. Eliphaz descended from Teman, the grandson of Esau, Genesis 36:11. Bildad probably from Shuah, Abraham's son by Keturah, Genesis 25:2. Zophar is thought to be same with Zepho, (Genesis 36:11.) a descendant from Esau. The preserving of so much wisdom and piety among those who were not children of the promise, was an happy presage of God's grace to the Gentiles, when the partition wall should be taken down.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Job 2:11

Now when Job's three (p) friends heard of all this evil that was come upon him, they came every one from his own place; Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite: for they had made an appointment together to come to mourn with him and to comfort him.

(p) Who were men of authority, wise and learned, and as the Septuagint writes, kings, and came to comfort him, but when they saw how he was visited, they conceived an evil opinion of him, as though he was a hypocrite and so justly plagued by God for his sins.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
friends:

Job 6:14 To him that is afflicted pity [should be shewed] from his friend; but he forsaketh the fear of the Almighty.
Job 16:20 My friends scorn me: [but] mine eye poureth out [tears] unto God.
Job 19:19 All my inward friends abhorred me: and they whom I loved are turned against me.
Job 19:21 Have pity upon me, have pity upon me, O ye my friends; for the hand of God hath touched me.
Job 42:7 And it was [so], that after the LORD had spoken these words unto Job, the LORD said to Eliphaz the Temanite, My wrath is kindled against thee, and against thy two friends: for ye have not spoken of me [the thing that is] right, as my servant Job [hath].
Proverbs 17:17 A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.
Proverbs 18:24 A man [that hath] friends must shew himself friendly: and there is a friend [that] sticketh closer than a brother.
Proverbs 27:10 Thine own friend, and thy father's friend, forsake not; neither go into thy brother's house in the day of thy calamity: [for] better [is] a neighbour [that is] near than a brother far off.

Temanite:

Job 6:19 The troops of Tema looked, the companies of Sheba waited for them.
Job 15:1 Then answered Eliphaz the Temanite, and said,
Genesis 36:11 And the sons of Eliphaz were Teman, Omar, Zepho, and Gatam, and Kenaz.
Genesis 36:15 These [were] dukes of the sons of Esau: the sons of Eliphaz the firstborn [son] of Esau; duke Teman, duke Omar, duke Zepho, duke Kenaz,
Jeremiah 49:7 Concerning Edom, thus saith the LORD of hosts; [Is] wisdom no more in Teman? is counsel perished from the prudent? is their wisdom vanished?

Shuhite:

Job 8:1 Then answered Bildad the Shuhite, and said,
Job 18:1 Then answered Bildad the Shuhite, and said,
Genesis 25:2 And she bare him Zimran, and Jokshan, and Medan, and Midian, and Ishbak, and Shuah.
1 Chronicles 1:32 Now the sons of Keturah, Abraham's concubine: she bare Zimran, and Jokshan, and Medan, and Midian, and Ishbak, and Shuah. And the sons of Jokshan; Sheba, and Dedan.

to come:

Job 42:11 Then came there unto him all his brethren, and all his sisters, and all they that had been of his acquaintance before, and did eat bread with him in his house: and they bemoaned him, and comforted him over all the evil that the LORD had brought upon him: every man also gave him a piece of money, and every one an earring of gold.
Genesis 37:35 And all his sons and all his daughters rose up to comfort him; but he refused to be comforted; and he said, For I will go down into the grave unto my son mourning. Thus his father wept for him.
Isaiah 51:19 These two [things] are come unto thee; who shall be sorry for thee? desolation, and destruction, and the famine, and the sword: by whom shall I comfort thee?
John 11:19 And many of the Jews came to Martha and Mary, to comfort them concerning their brother.
Romans 12:15 Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them that weep.
1 Corinthians 12:26 And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.
Hebrews 13:3 Remember them that are in bonds, as bound with them; [and] them which suffer adversity, as being yourselves also in the body.

to comfort:

Job 13:4 But ye [are] forgers of lies, ye [are] all physicians of no value.
Job 16:2 I have heard many such things: miserable comforters [are] ye all.
Random Bible VersesNew Quotes



Chain-Reference Bible Search

Gn 25:2; 36:11, 15; 37:35. 1Ch 1:32. Jb 6:14, 19; 8:1; 13:4; 15:1; 16:2, 20; 18:1; 19:19, 21; 42:7, 11. Pv 17:17; 18:24; 27:10. Is 51:19. Jr 49:7. Jn 11:19. Ro 12:15. 1Co 12:26. He 13:3.

Newest Chat Bible Comment
Comment HereComplete Biblical ResearchComplete Chat Bible Commentary
Please post your comment on Job 2:11.
Name:

WWW Chat Bible Commentary

User-Posted Comments on Job 2:11


Recent Chat Bible Comments