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Galatians 4:12 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— I beseech you, brethren, become as I [am], for I also [am become] as ye [are]. Ye did me no wrong:
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Brethren, I beseech you, be as I [am]; for I [am] as ye [are]: ye have not injured me at all.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— I beg of you, brethren, become as I [am], for I also [have become] as you [are]. You have done me no wrong;
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Brethren, I beseech you, be as I am; for I [am] as ye [are]: ye have not injured me at all.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Be as *I* [am], for *I* also [am] as *ye*, brethren, I beseech you: ye have not at all wronged me.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Become ye as, I, because, I also, [was] as, ye,—brethren, I entreat you. Not at all, have ye wronged me.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— Become as I [am]—because I also [am] as ye brethren, I beseech you; to me ye did no hurt,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Be ye as I, because I also am as you brethren, I beseech you. You have not injured me at all.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Brethren, I beseech you, be as I [am]; for I [am] as ye are, ye haue not iniured me at all.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— Be you as I am, for I am as you are, my brethren, I beseech you. In nothing have you injured me.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— Be ye like me; because I have been like you. My brethren, I beseech you. Ye have not injured me at all.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Brethren, 80
{0080} Prime
ἀδελφός
adelphos
{ad-el-fos'}
From G0001 (as a connective particle) and δελφύς [[delphus]] (the womb); a brother (literally or figuratively) near or remote (much like [H0001]).
I beseech 1189
{1189} Prime
δέομαι
deomai
{deh'-om-ahee}
Middle voice of G1210; to beg (as binding oneself), that is, petition.
z5736
<5736> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 618
you, 5216
{5216} Prime
ὑμῶν
humon
{hoo-mone'}
Genitive case of G5210; of (from or concerning) you.
be 1096
{1096} Prime
γίνομαι
ginomai
{ghin'-om-ahee}
A prolonged and middle form of a primary verb; to cause to be ('gen' -erate), that is, (reflexively) to become (come into being), used with great latitude (literally, figuratively, intensively, etc.).
z5737
<5737> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Imperative (See G5794)
Count - 152
as 5613
{5613} Prime
ὡς
hos
{hoce}
Probably adverb of comparative from G3739; which how, that is, in that manner (very variously used as shown).
I 1473
{1473} Prime
ἐγώ
ego
{eg-o'}
A primary pronoun of the first person, 'I' (only expressed when emphatic).
[am]; for 3754
{3754} Prime
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
I 2504
{2504} Prime
κἀγώ
kago
{kag-o'}
So also the dative (second form) and accusative (third form); from G2532 and G1473; and (or also, even, etc.) I, (to) me.
[am] as 5613
{5613} Prime
ὡς
hos
{hoce}
Probably adverb of comparative from G3739; which how, that is, in that manner (very variously used as shown).
ye 5210
{5210} Prime
ὑμεῖς
humeis
{hoo-mice'}
Irregular plural of G4771; you (as subject of verb).
[are]: ye have not injured y91
[0091] Standard
ἀδικέω
adikeo
{ad-ee-keh'-o}
From G0094; to be unjust, that is, (actively) do wrong (morally, socially or physically).
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
me y3165
[3165] Standard
μέ
me
{meh}
A shorter (and probably original) form of G1691; me.
at all. 3762
{3762} Prime
οὐδείς
oudeis
{oo-dice'}
From G3761 and G1520; not even one (man, woman or thing), that is, none, nobody, nothing.
x91
(0091) Complement
ἀδικέω
adikeo
{ad-ee-keh'-o}
From G0094; to be unjust, that is, (actively) do wrong (morally, socially or physically).
x3165
(3165) Complement
μέ
me
{meh}
A shorter (and probably original) form of G1691; me.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Galatians 4:12

_ _ be as I am — “As I have in my life among you cast off Jewish habits, so do ye; for I am become as ye are,” namely, in the non-observance of legal ordinances. “The fact of my laying them aside among Gentiles, shows that I regard them as not at all contributing to justification or sanctification. Do you regard them in the same light, and act accordingly.” His observing the law among the Jews was not inconsistent with this, for he did so only in order to win them, without compromising principle. On the other hand, the Galatian Gentiles, by adopting legal ordinances, showed that they regarded them as needful for salvation. This Paul combats.

_ _ ye have not injured me at all — namely, at the period when I first preached the Gospel among you, and when I made myself as you are, namely, living as a Gentile, not as a Jew. You at that time did me no wrong; “ye did not despise my temptation in the flesh” (Galatians 4:14): nay, you “received me as an angel of God.” Then in Galatians 4:16, he asks, “Have I then, since that time, become your enemy by telling you the truth?”

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Galatians 4:12-16

_ _ That these Christians might be the more ashamed of their defection from the truth of the gospel which Paul had preached to them, he here reminds them of the great affection they formerly had for him and his ministry, and puts them upon considering how very unsuitable their present behaviour was to what they then professed. And here we may observe,

_ _ I. How affectionately he addresses himself to them. He styles them brethren, though he knew their hearts were in a great measure alienated from him. He desires that all resentments might be laid aside, and that they would bear the same temper of mind towards him which he did to them; he would have them to be as he was, for he was as they were, and moreover tells them that they had not injured him at all. He had no quarrel with them upon his own account. Though, in blaming their conduct, he had expressed himself with some warmth and concern of mind he assured them that it was not owing to any sense of personal injury or affront (as they might be ready to think), but proceeded wholly from a zeal for the truth and purity of the gospel, and their welfare and happiness. Thus he endeavours to mollify their spirits towards him, that so they might be the better disposed to receive the admonitions he was giving them. Hereby he teaches us that in reproving others we should take care to convince them that our reproofs do not proceed from any private pique or resentment, but from a sincere regard to the honour of God and religion and their truest welfare; for they are then likely to be most successful when they appear to be most disinterested.

_ _ II. How he magnifies their former affection to him, that hereby they might be the more ashamed of their present behaviour towards him. To this purpose, 1. He puts them in mind of the difficulty under which he laboured when he came first among them: I knew, says he, how, through infirmity of the flesh, I preached the gospel unto you at the first. What this infirmity of the flesh was, which in the following words he expresses by his temptation that was in his flesh (though, no doubt, it was well known to those Christians to whom he wrote), we can now have no certain knowledge of: some take it to have been the persecutions which he suffered for the gospel's sake; others, to have been something in his person, or manner of speaking, which might render his ministry less grateful and acceptable, referring to 2 Corinthians 10:10, and to 2 Corinthians 12:7-10. But, whatever it was, it seems it made no impression on them to his disadvantage. For, 2. He takes notice that, notwithstanding this his infirmity (which might possibly lessen him in the esteem of some others), they did not despise nor reject him on the account of it, but, on the contrary, received him as an angel of God, even as Christ Jesus. They showed a great deal of respect to him, he was a welcome messenger to them, even as though an angel of God or Jesus Christ himself had preached to them; yea, so great was their esteem of him, that, if it would have been any advantage to him, they could have plucked out their own eyes, and have given them to him. Note, How uncertain the respects of people are, how apt they are to change their minds, and how easily they are drawn into contempt of those for whom they once had the greatest esteem and affection, so that they are ready to pluck out the eyes of those for whom they would before have plucked out their own! We should therefore labour to be accepted of God, for it is a small thing to be judged of man's judgment, 1 Corinthians 4:3.

_ _ III. How earnestly he expostulates with them hereupon: Where is then, says he, the blessedness you spoke of? As if he had said, “Time was when you expressed the greatest joy and satisfaction in the glad tidings of the gospel, and were very forward in pouring out your blessings upon me as the publisher of them; whence is it that you are now so much altered, that you have so little relish of them or respect for me? You once thought yourselves happy in receiving the gospel; have you now any reason to think otherwise?” Note, Those who have left their first love would do well to consider, Where is now the blessedness they once spoke of? What has become of that pleasure they used to take in communion with God, and in the company of his servants? The more to impress upon them a just shame of their present conduct, he again asks (Galatians 4:16), “Am I become your enemy, because I tell you the truth? How is it that I, who was heretofore your favourite, am now accounted your enemy? Can you pretend any other reason for it than that I have told you the truth, endeavoured to acquaint you with, and to confirm you in, the truth of the gospel? And, if not, how unreasonable must your disaffection be!” Note, 1. It is no uncommon thing for men to account those their enemies who are really their best friends; for so, undoubtedly, those are, whether ministers or others, who tell them the truth, and deal freely and faithfully with them in matters relating to their eternal salvation, as the apostle now did with these Christians. 2. Ministers may sometimes create enemies to themselves by the faithful discharge of their duty; for this was the case of Paul, he was accounted their enemy for telling them the truth. 3. Yet ministers must not forbear speaking the truth, for fear of offending others and drawing their displeasure upon them. 4. They may be easy in their own minds, when they are conscious to themselves that, if others have become their enemies, it is only for telling them the truth.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Galatians 4:12

Brethren, I beseech you, be as I am — Meet me in mutual love. For I am as ye were — I still love you as affectionately as ye once loved me. Why should I not? Ye have not injured me at all — I have received no personal injury from you.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Galatians 4:12

(5) Brethren, I beseech you, be as I [am]; for I [am] as ye [are]: ye have not injured me at all.

(5) He moderates and qualifies those things in which he might have seemed to have spoken somewhat sharply, very skilfully and divinely declaring his good will toward them in such a way, that the Galatians could not but either be utterly hopeless when they read these things, or acknowledge their own lack of steadfastness with tears, and desire pardon.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
be:

Galatians 2:14 But when I saw that they walked not uprightly according to the truth of the gospel, I said unto Peter before [them] all, If thou, being a Jew, livest after the manner of Gentiles, and not as do the Jews, why compellest thou the Gentiles to live as do the Jews?
Galatians 6:14 But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world.
Genesis 34:15 But in this will we consent unto you: If ye will be as we [be], that every male of you be circumcised;
1 Kings 22:4 And he said unto Jehoshaphat, Wilt thou go with me to battle to Ramothgilead? And Jehoshaphat said to the king of Israel, I [am] as thou [art], my people as thy people, my horses as thy horses.
Acts 21:21 And they are informed of thee, that thou teachest all the Jews which are among the Gentiles to forsake Moses, saying that they ought not to circumcise [their] children, neither to walk after the customs.
1 Corinthians 9:20-23 And unto the Jews I became as a Jew, that I might gain the Jews; to them that are under the law, as under the law, that I might gain them that are under the law; ... And this I do for the gospel's sake, that I might be partaker thereof with [you].
Philippians 3:7-8 But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ. ... Yea doubtless, and I count all things [but] loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them [but] dung, that I may win Christ,

ye:

2 Corinthians 2:5 But if any have caused grief, he hath not grieved me, but in part: that I may not overcharge you all.
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Gn 34:15. 1K 22:4. Ac 21:21. 1Co 9:20. 2Co 2:5. Ga 2:14; 6:14. Php 3:7.

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