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Ezekiel 5:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And thou, son of man, take thee a sharp sword; [as] a barber's razor shalt thou take it unto thee, and shalt cause it to pass upon thy head and upon thy beard: then take thee balances to weigh, and divide the hair.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And thou, son of man, take thee a sharp knife, take thee a barber's razor, and cause [it] to pass upon thine head and upon thy beard: then take thee balances to weigh, and divide the [hair].
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— “As for you, son of man, take a sharp sword; take and use it [as] a barber’s razor on your head and beard. Then take scales for weighing and divide the hair.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And thou, son of man, take thee a sharp knife, take thee a barber's razor, and cause [it] to pass upon thy head and upon thy beard: then take to thee balances to weigh, and divide the [hair].
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And thou, son of man, take thee a sharp knife; a barber's razor shalt thou take; and cause it to pass upon thy head and upon thy beard: and thou shalt take balances to weigh, and divide the [hair].
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Thou, therefore, son of man, Take thee a sharp cuting instrument, a barber's razor, shalt thou take thee, and shalt cause it to pass upon thy head, and upon thy chin,—and shalt take the balances for weighing, and shalt divide the hair.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— 'And thou, son of man, take to thee a sharp weapon, the barber's razor thou dost take to thee, and thou hast caused [it] to pass over thy head, and over thy beard, and thou hast taken to thee weighing scales, and apportioned them.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And thou, son of man, take thee a sharp knife that shaveth the hair: and cause it to pass over thy head, and over thy beard: and take thee a balance to weigh in, and divide the hair.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And thou sonne of man, take thee a sharpe knife, take thee a barbours rasor, and cause [it] to passe vpon thine head and vpon thy beard: then take the ballances to weigh, and diuide the [haire].
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— And thou, son of man, take thee a sword sharper than a barber's razor; thou shalt procure it for thyself, and shalt bring it upon thine head, and upon thy beard: and thou shalt take a pair of scales, and shalt separate the hair.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— And thou, son of man, take thee a sharp knife, take thee a barber's razor, and cause [it] to pass upon thine head and upon thy beard: then take thee balances to weigh, and divide the [hair].

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And thou, x859
(0859) Complement
אַתָּה
'attah
{at-taw'}
A primitive pronoun of the second person; thou and thee, or (plural) ye and you.
son 1121
{1121} Prime
בֵּן
ben
{bane}
From H1129; a son (as a builder of the family name), in the widest sense (of literal and figurative relationship, including grandson, subject, nation, quality or condition, etc., (like H0001, H0251, etc.).
of man, 120
{0120} Prime
אָדָם
'adam
{aw-dawm'}
From H0119; ruddy, that is, a human being (an individual or the species, mankind, etc.).
take 3947
{3947} Prime
לָקַח
laqach
{law-kakh'}
A primitive root; to take (in the widest variety of applications).
z8798
<8798> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperative (See H8810)
Count - 2847
thee a sharp 2299
{2299} Prime
חֲדָה
chad
{khad}
From H2300; sharp.
knife, 2719
{2719} Prime
חֶרֶב
chereb
{kheh'-reb}
From H2717; drought; also a cutting instrument (from its destructive effect), as a knife, sword, or other sharp implement.
take 3947
{3947} Prime
לָקַח
laqach
{law-kakh'}
A primitive root; to take (in the widest variety of applications).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
thee a barber's 1532
{1532} Prime
גַּלָּב
gallab
{gal-lawb'}
From an unused root meaning to shave; a barber.
razor, 8593
{8593} Prime
תַּעַר
ta`ar
{tah'-ar}
From H6168; a knife or razor (as making bare); also a scabbard (as being bare, that is, empty).
and cause [it] to pass 5674
{5674} Prime
עָבַר
`abar
{aw-bar'}
A primitive root; to cross over; used very widely of any transition (literally or figuratively; transitively, intransitively, intensively or causatively); specifically to cover (in copulation).
z8689
<8689> Grammar
Stem - Hiphil (See H8818)
Mood - Perfect (See H8816)
Count - 2675
upon x5921
(5921) Complement
עַל
`al
{al}
Properly the same as H5920 used as a preposition (in the singular or plural, often with prefix, or as conjugation with a particle following); above, over, upon, or against (yet always in this last relation with a downward aspect) in a great variety of applications.
thine head 7218
{7218} Prime
רֹאשׁ
ro'sh
{roshe}
From an unused root apparently meaning to shake; the head (as most easily shaken), whether literally or figuratively (in many applications, of place, time, rank, etc.).
and upon x5921
(5921) Complement
עַל
`al
{al}
Properly the same as H5920 used as a preposition (in the singular or plural, often with prefix, or as conjugation with a particle following); above, over, upon, or against (yet always in this last relation with a downward aspect) in a great variety of applications.
thy beard: 2206
{2206} Prime
זָקָן
zaqan
{zaw-kawn'}
From H2204; the beard (as indicating age).
then take 3947
{3947} Prime
לָקַח
laqach
{law-kakh'}
A primitive root; to take (in the widest variety of applications).
z8804
<8804> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Perfect (See H8816)
Count - 12562
thee balances 3976
{3976} Prime
מֹאזֵן
mo'zen
{mo-zane'}
From H0239; (only in the dual) a pair of scales.
to weigh, 4948
{4948} Prime
מִשְׁקָל
mishqal
{mish-kawl'}
From H8254; weight (numerically estimated); hence, weighing (the act).
and divide 2505
{2505} Prime
חָלַק
chalaq
{khaw-lak'}
A primitive root; to be smooth (figuratively); by implication (as smooth stones were used for lots) to apportion or separate.
z8765
<8765> Grammar
Stem - Piel (See H8840)
Mood - Perfect (See H8816)
Count - 2121
the [hair].
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Ezekiel 5:1

_ _ Ezekiel 5:1-17. Vision of cutting the hairs, and the calamities foreshadowed thereby.

_ _ knife ... razor — the sword of the foe (compare Isaiah 7:20). This vision implies even severer judgments than the Egyptian afflictions foreshadowed in the former, for their guilt was greater than that of their forefathers.

_ _ thine head — as representative of the Jews. The whole hair being shaven off was significant of severe and humiliating (2 Samuel 10:4, 2 Samuel 10:5) treatment. Especially in the case of a priest; for priests (Leviticus 21:5) were forbidden “to make baldness on their head,” their hair being the token of consecration; hereby it was intimated that the ceremonial must give place to the moral.

_ _ balances — implying the just discrimination with which Jehovah weighs out the portion of punishment “divided,” that is, allotted to each: the “hairs” are the Jews: the divine scales do not allow even one hair to escape accurate weighing (compare Matthew 10:30).

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Ezekiel 5:1-4

_ _ We have here the sign by which the utter destruction of Jerusalem is set forth; and here, as before, the prophet is himself the sign, that the people might see how much he affected himself with, and interested himself in, the case of Jerusalem, and how it lay to his heart, even when he foretold the desolations of it. he was so much concerned about it as to take what was done to it as done to himself, so far was he from desiring the woeful day.

_ _ I. He must shave off the hair of his head and beard (Ezekiel 5:1), which signified God's utter rejecting and abandoning that people, as a useless worthless generation, such as could well be spared, nay, such as it would be his honour to part with; his judgments, and all the instruments he made use of in cutting them off, were this sharp knife and this razor, that were proper to be made use of, and would do execution. Jerusalem had been the head, but, having degenerated, had become as the hair, which, when it grows thick and long, is but a burden which a man wishes to get clear of, as God of the sinners in Zion. Ah! I will ease me of my adversaries, Isaiah 1:24. Ezekiel must not cut off that hair only which was superfluous, but cut it all off, denoting the full end that God would make of Jerusalem. The hair that would not be trimmed and kept neat and clean by the admonitions of the prophets must be all shaved off by utter destruction. Those will be ruined that will not be reformed.

_ _ II. He must weigh the hair and divide it into three parts. This intimates the very exact directing of God's judgments according to equity (by him men and their actions are weighed in the unerring balance of truth and righteousness) and the proportion which divine justice observes in punishing some by one judgment and others by another; one way or other, they shall all be met with. Some make the shaving of the hair to denote the loss of their liberty and of their honour: it was looked upon as a mark of ignominy, as in the disgrace Hanun put on David's ambassadors. It denotes also the loss of their joy, for they shaved their heads upon occasion of great mourning; I may add the loss of their Nazariteship, for the shaving of the head was a period to that vow (Numbers 6:18), and Jerusalem was now no longer looked upon as a holy city.

_ _ III. He must dispose of the hair so that it might all be destroyed or dispersed, Ezekiel 5:2. 1. One third part must be burnt in the midst of the city, denoting the multitudes that should perish by famine and pestilence, and perhaps many in the conflagration of the city, when the days of the siege were fulfilled. Or the laying of that glorious city in ashes might well be looked upon as a third part of the destruction threatened. 2. Another third part was to be cut in pieces with a knife, representing the many who, during the siege, were slain by the sword, in their sallies out upon the besiegers, and especially when the city was taken by storm, the Chaldeans being then most furious and the Jews most feeble. 3. Another third part was to be scattered in the wind, denoting the carrying away of some into the land of the conqueror and the flight of others into the neighbouring countries for shelter; so that they were hurried, some one way and some another, like loose hairs in the wind. But, lest they should think that this dispersion would be their escape, God adds, I will draw out a sword after them, so that wherever they go evil shall pursue them. Note, God has variety of judgments wherewith to accomplish the destruction of a sinful people and to make an end when he begins.

_ _ IV. He must preserve a small quantity of the third sort that were to be scattered in the wind, and bind them in his skirts, as one would bind that which he is very mindful and careful of, Ezekiel 5:3. This signified perhaps that little handful of people which were left under the government of Gedaliah, who, it was hoped, would keep possession of the land when the body of the people was carried into captivity. Thus God would have done well for them if they would have done well for themselves. But these few that were reserved must be taken and cast into the fire, Ezekiel 5:4. When Gedaliah and his friends were slain the people that put themselves under his protection were scattered, some gone into Egypt, others carried off by the Chaldeans, and in short the land totally cleared of them; then this was fulfilled, for out of those combustions a fire came forth into all the house of Israel, who, as fuel upon the fire, kindled and consumed one another. Note, It is ill with a people when those are taken away in wrath that seemed to be marked for monuments of mercy; for then there is no remnant or escaping, none shut up or left.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Ezekiel 5:1

Take — Thus foretel the mourning, reproach, and deformity that are coming, for all this is signified by shaving the head and beard.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Ezekiel 5:1

And thou, son of man, take thee a sharp knife, take thee a barber's razor, and cause [it] (a) to pass upon thy head and upon thy beard: then take to thee balances to weigh, and divide the [hair].

(a) To shave your head and your beard.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
son:
In this expressive emblem, the prophet represents the Jewish nation; his hair, the people; the razor, the Chaldeans; the cutting of the hair, the calamities and disgrace coming upon them; the balances, the exact distribution of the Divine judgments; the third part of the hair burnt, those destroyed in the city; the third part smitten with a knife, those slain in attempting to escape; the third part scattered to the winds, those who escaped to other countries; the few hairs in his skirt, those left with Gedaliah; and the burning of these, their destruction in Egypt.

take:

Ezekiel 44:20 Neither shall they shave their heads, nor suffer their locks to grow long; they shall only poll their heads.
Leviticus 21:5 They shall not make baldness upon their head, neither shall they shave off the corner of their beard, nor make any cuttings in their flesh.
Isaiah 7:20 In the same day shall the Lord shave with a razor that is hired, [namely], by them beyond the river, by the king of Assyria, the head, and the hair of the feet: and it shall also consume the beard.

then:

Daniel 5:27 TEKEL; Thou art weighed in the balances, and art found wanting.
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Lv 21:5. Is 7:20. Ezk 44:20. Dn 5:27.

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