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Ezekiel 40:5 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And, behold, a wall on the outside of the house round about, and in the man's hand a measuring reed six cubits long, of a cubit and a handbreadth each: so he measured the thickness of the building, one reed; and the height, one reed.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And behold a wall on the outside of the house round about, and in the man's hand a measuring reed of six cubits [long] by the cubit and an hand breadth: so he measured the breadth of the building, one reed; and the height, one reed.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— And behold, there was a wall on the outside of the temple all around, and in the man’s hand was a measuring rod of six cubits, [each of which was] a cubit and a handbreadth. So he measured the thickness of the wall, one rod; and the height, one rod.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And behold a wall on the outside of the house around, and in the man's hand a measuring reed of six cubits [long] by the cubit and a hand-breadth: so he measured the breadth of the building, one reed: and the hight, one reed.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And behold, there was a wall on the outside of the house round about, and in the man's hand a measuring-reed of six cubits, [each] of one cubit and a hand breadth. And he measured the breadth of the building, one reed; and the height, one reed.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And lo! a wall on the outside of the house, round about on every side,—and, in the hand of the man, was the measuring reed, six cubits by the cubit, and a handbreadth, so he measured the breadth of the enclosing-wall, one reed, and the height, one reed.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And lo, a wall on the outside of the house all round about, and in the hand of the man a measuring-reed, six cubits by a cubit and a handbreadth, and he measureth the breadth of the building one reed, and the height one reed.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And behold there was a wall on the outside of the house round about, and in the man's hand a measuring reed of six cubits and a handbreadth: and he measured the breadth of the building one reed, and the height one reed.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And behold a wall on the outside of the house round about: and in the mans hand a measuring reed of sixe cubites long, by the cubite, and an hand breadth: so hee measured the breadth of the building, one reed, and the height one reed.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— And behold a wall round about the house without, and in the man's hand a reed, the measure [of it was] six cubits by the cubit, and a span: and he measured across the front wall; the breadth was equal to the reed, and the length of it equal to the reed.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— And behold a wall on the outside of the house round about, and in the man's hand a measuring reed of six cubits [long] by the cubit and an hand breadth: so he measured the breadth of the building, one reed; and the height, one reed.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And behold x2009
(2009) Complement
הִנֵּה
hinneh
{hin-nay'}
Prolonged for H2005; lo!.
a wall 2346
{2346} Prime
חוֹמָה
chowmah
{kho-maw'}
Feminine active participle of an unused root apparently meaning to join; a wall of protection.
on the outside 2351
{2351} Prime
חוּץ
chuwts
{khoots}
(Both forms feminine in the plural); from an unused root meaning to sever; properly separate by a wall, that is, outside, outdoors.
x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
of the house 1004
{1004} Prime
בַּיִת
bayith
{bah'-yith}
Probably from H1129 abbreviated; a house (in the greatest variation of applications, especially family, etc.).
round about, 5439
{5439} Prime
סָבִיב
cabiyb
{saw-beeb'}
From H5437; (as noun) a circle, neighbor, or environs; but chiefly (as adverb, with or without preposition) around.
and in the man's 376
{0376} Prime
אִישׁ
'iysh
{eesh}
Contracted for H0582 (or perhaps rather from an unused root meaning to be extant); a man as an individual or a male person; often used as an adjunct to a more definite term (and in such cases frequently not expressed in translation.).
hand 3027
{3027} Prime
יָד
yad
{yawd}
A primitive word; a hand (the open one (indicating power, means, direction, etc.), in distinction from H3709, the closed one); used (as noun, adverb, etc.) in a great variety of applications, both literally and figuratively, both proximate and remote.
a measuring 4060
{4060} Prime
מִדָּה
middah
{mid-daw'}
Feminine of H4055; properly extension, that is, height or breadth; also a measure (including its standard); hence a portion (as measured) or a vestment; specifically tribute (as measured).
reed 7070
{7070} Prime
קָנֶה
qaneh
{kaw-neh'}
From H7069; a reed (as erect); by resemblance a rod (especially for measuring), shaft, tube, stem, the radius (of the arm), beam (of a steelyard).
of six 8337
{8337} Prime
שֵׁשׁ
shesh
{shaysh}
(The second form is masculine); a primitive number; six (as an overplus (see H7797) beyond five or the fingers of the hand); as ordinal sixth.
cubits 520
{0520} Prime
אַמָּה
'ammah
{am-maw'}
Prolonged from H0517; properly a mother (that is, unit) of measure, or the forearm (below the elbow), that is, a cubit; also a door base (as a bond of the entrance).
[long] by the cubit 520
{0520} Prime
אַמָּה
'ammah
{am-maw'}
Prolonged from H0517; properly a mother (that is, unit) of measure, or the forearm (below the elbow), that is, a cubit; also a door base (as a bond of the entrance).
and an hand breadth: 2948
{2948} Prime
טֹפַח
tophach
{to'-fakh}
From H2946 (the same as H2947).
so he measured 4058
{4058} Prime
מָדַד
madad
{maw-dad'}
A primitive root; properly to stretch; by implication to measure (as if by stretching a line); figuratively to be extended.
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
x853
(0853) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Apparently contracted from H0226 in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, even or namely).
the breadth 7341
{7341} Prime
רֹחַב
rochab
{ro'-khab}
From H7337; width (literally or figuratively).
of the building, 1146
{1146} Prime
בִּנְיָן
binyan
{bin-yawn'}
From H1129; an edifice.
one 259
{0259} Prime
אֶחָד
'echad
{ekh-awd'}
A numeral from H0258; properly united, that is, one; or (as an ordinal) first.
reed; 7070
{7070} Prime
קָנֶה
qaneh
{kaw-neh'}
From H7069; a reed (as erect); by resemblance a rod (especially for measuring), shaft, tube, stem, the radius (of the arm), beam (of a steelyard).
and the height, 6967
{6967} Prime
קוֹמָה
qowmah
{ko-maw'}
From H6965; height.
one 259
{0259} Prime
אֶחָד
'echad
{ekh-awd'}
A numeral from H0258; properly united, that is, one; or (as an ordinal) first.
reed. 7070
{7070} Prime
קָנֶה
qaneh
{kaw-neh'}
From H7069; a reed (as erect); by resemblance a rod (especially for measuring), shaft, tube, stem, the radius (of the arm), beam (of a steelyard).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Ezekiel 40:5

_ _ Measures were mostly taken from the human body. The greater cubit, the length from the elbow to the end of the middle finger, a little more than two feet: exceeding the ordinary cubit (from the elbow to the wrist) by an hand-breadth, that is, twenty-one inches in all. Compare Ezekiel 43:13, with Ezekiel 40:5. The palm was the full breadth of the hand, three and a half inches.

_ _ breadth of the building — that is, the boundary wall. The imperfections in the old temple’s boundary wall were to have no place here. The buildings attached to it had been sometimes turned to common uses; for example, Jeremiah was imprisoned in one (Jeremiah 20:2; Jeremiah 29:26). But now all these were to be holy to the Lord. The gates and doorways to the city of God were to be imprinted in their architecture with the idea of the exclusion of everything defiled (Revelation 21:27). The east gate was to be especially sacred, as it was through it the glory of God had departed (Ezekiel 11:23), and through it the glory was to return (Ezekiel 43:1, Ezekiel 43:2; Ezekiel 44:2, Ezekiel 44:3).

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Ezekiel 40:5-26

_ _ The measuring-reed which was in the hand of the surveyor-general was mentioned before, Ezekiel 40:3. Here we are told (Ezekiel 40:5) what was the exact length of it, which must be observed, because the house was measured by it. It was six cubits long, reckoning, not by the common cubit, but the cubit of the sanctuary, the sacred cubit, by which it was fit that this holy house should be measured, and that was a hand-breadth (that it, four inches) longer than the common cubit: the common cubit was eighteen inches, this twenty-two, see Ezekiel 43:13. Yet some of the critics contend that this measuring-reed was but six common cubits in length, and one handbreadth added to the whole. The former seems more probable. Here is an account,

_ _ I. Of the outer wall of the house, which encompassed it round, which was three yards thick and three yards high, which denotes the separation between the church and the world on every side and the divine protection which the church is under. If a wall of this vast thickness will not secure it, God himself will be a wall of fire round about it; whoever attack it will do so at their peril.

_ _ II. Of the several gates with the chambers adjoining to them. Here is no mention of the outer court of all, which was called the court of the Gentiles, some think because in gospel-times there should be such a vast confluence of Gentiles to the church that their court should be left unmeasured, to signify that the worshippers in that court should be unnumbered, Revelation 7:9, Revelation 7:11, Revelation 7:12.

_ _ 1. He begins with the east gate, because that was the usual way of entering into the lower end of the temple, the holy of holies being at the west end, in opposition to the idolatrous heathen that worshipped towards the east. Now, in the account of this gate, observe, (1.) That he went up to it by stairs (Ezekiel 40:6), for the gospel-church was exalted above that of the Old Testament, and when we go to worship God we must ascend; so is the call, Revelation 4:1. Come up hither. Sursum cordaUp with your hearts. (2.) That the chambers adjoining to the gates were but little chambers, about ten feet square, Ezekiel 40:7. These were for those to lodge in who attended the service of the house. And it becomes such as are made spiritual priests to God to content themselves with little chambers and not to seek great things to themselves; so that we may but have a place within the verge of God's court we have reason to be thankful though it be in a little chamber, a mean apartment, though we be but door-keepers there. (3.) The chambers, as they were each of them four-square, denoting their stability and due proportion and their exact agreement with the rule (for they were each of them one reed long and one reed broad), so they were all of one measure, that there might be an equality among the attendants on the service of the house. (4.) The chambers were very many; for in our Father's house there are many mansions (John 14:2), in his house above, and in that here on earth. In the secret of his tabernacle shall those be hid, and in a safe pavilion, whose desire is to dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of their life, Psalms 27:4, Psalms 27:5. Some make these chambers to represent the particular congregations of believers, which are parts of the great temple, the universal church, which are, and must be, framed by the scripture-line and rule, and which Jesus Christ takes the measure of, that is, takes cognizance of, for he walks in the midst of the seven golden candle-sticks. (5.) It is said (Ezekiel 40:14), He made also the posts. He that now measured them was the same that made them; for Christ is the builder of his church and therefore is best able to give us the knowledge of it. And his reducing them to the rule and standard is called his making them, for no account is made of them further than they agree with that. To the law and to the testimony. (6.) Here are posts of sixty cubits, which, some think, was literally fulfilled when Cyrus, in his edict for rebuilding the temple at Jerusalem, ordered that the height thereof should be sixty cubits, that is, thirty yards and more, Ezra 6:3. (7.) Here were windows to the little chambers, and windows to the posts and arches (that is, to the cloisters below), and windows round about (Ezekiel 40:16), to signify the light from heaven with which the church is illuminated; divine revelation is let into it for instruction, direction, and comfort, to those that dwell in God's house, light to work by, light to walk by, light to see themselves and one another by. There were lights to the little chambers; even the least, and least considerable, parts and members of the church, shall have light afforded them. All thy children shall be taught of the Lord. But they are narrow windows, as those in the temple, 1 Kings 6:4. The discoveries made to the church on earth are but narrow and scanty compared with what shall be in the future state, when we shall no longer see through a glass darkly. (8.) Divers courts are here spoken of, an outermost of all, then an outer court, then an inner, and then the innermost of all, into which the priests only entered, which (some think) may put us in mind “of the diversities of gifts, and graces, and offices, in the several members of Christ's mystical body here, as also of the several degrees of glory in the courts and mansions of heaven, as there are stars in several spheres and stars of several magnitudes in the fixed firmament.” English Annotations. Some draw nearer to God than others and have a more intimate acquaintance with divine things; but to a child of God a day in any of his courts is better than a thousand elsewhere. These courts had porches, or piazzas, round them, for the shelter of those that attended in them from wind and weather; for when we are in the way of our duty to God we may believe ourselves to be under his special protection, that he will graciously provide for us, nay, that he will himself be to us a covert from the storm and tempest, Isaiah 4:5, Isaiah 4:6. (9.) On the posts were palm-trees engraven (Ezekiel 40:16), to signify that the righteous shall flourish like the palm-tree in the courts of God's house, Psalms 92:12. The more they are depressed with the burden of affliction the more strongly do they grow, as they say of the palm-trees. It likewise intimates the saints' victory and triumph over their spiritual enemies; they have palms in their hands (Revelation 7:9); but lest they should drop these, or have them snatched out of their hands, they are here engraven upon the posts of the temple as perpetual monuments of their honour. Thanks be to God, who always causes us to triumph. Nay, believers shall themselves be made pillars in the temple of our God, and shall go no more out, and shall have his name engraven on them, which will be their brightest ornament and honour, Revelation 3:12. (10.) Notice is here taken of the pavement of the court, Ezekiel 40:17, Ezekiel 40:18. The word intimates that the pavement was made of porphyry-stone, which was of the colour of burning coals; for the brightest and most sparkling glories of this world should be put and kept under our feet when we draw near to God and are attending upon him. The stars are, as it were, the burning coals, or stones of a fiery colour, with which the pavement of God's celestial temple is laid; and, if the pavement of the court be so bright and glittering, how glorious must we conclude the mansions of that house to be!

_ _ 2. The gates that looked towards the north (Ezekiel 40:20) and towards the south (Ezekiel 40:24), with their appurtenances, are much the same with that towards the east, after the measure of the first gate, Ezekiel 40:21. But the description is repeated very particularly. And thus largely was the structure of the tabernacle related in Exodus, and of the temple in the books of Kings and Chronicles, to signify the special notice God does take, and his ministers should take, of all that belong to his church. His delight is in them; his eye is upon them. He knows all that are his, all his living temples and all that belongs to them. Observe, (1.) This temple had not only a gate towards the east, to let into it the children of the east, that were famous for their wealth and wisdom, but it had a gate to the north, and another to the south, for the admission of the poorer and less civilized nations. The new Jerusalem has twelve gates, three towards each quarter of the world (Revelation 21:13); for many shall come from all parts to sit down there, Matthew 8:11. (2.) To those gates they went up by steps, seven steps (Ezekiel 40:22-26), which, as some observe, may remind us of the necessity of advancing in grace and holiness, adding one grace to another, going from step to step, from strength to strength, still pressing forward towards perfection — upward, upward, towards heaven, the temple above.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Ezekiel 40:5

A wall — This was that outmost wall, that compassed the whole mount Sion, upon whose top the temple stood. The man's hand — Christ, hath, and keeps the reed in his own hand, as the only fit person to take the measures of all. A measuring reed — Or cane, for this measuring rod was of those canes growing in that country, long, and light, which architects made use of. Six cubits long — Each cubit consisting of eighteen inches in our common account. An hand breadth — Added to each six cubits. The breadth — The thickness of the walls, which were one reed, and one hand's breadth, or three yards, and three inches thick. Height — And the height equal, taking the measure from the floor on the inside of the wall.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

[[no comment]]

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
a wall:

Ezekiel 42:20 He measured it by the four sides: it had a wall round about, five hundred [reeds] long, and five hundred broad, to make a separation between the sanctuary and the profane place.
Psalms 125:2 As the mountains [are] round about Jerusalem, so the LORD [is] round about his people from henceforth even for ever.
Isaiah 26:1 In that day shall this song be sung in the land of Judah; We have a strong city; salvation will [God] appoint [for] walls and bulwarks.
Isaiah 60:18 Violence shall no more be heard in thy land, wasting nor destruction within thy borders; but thou shalt call thy walls Salvation, and thy gates Praise.
Zechariah 2:5 For I, saith the LORD, will be unto her a wall of fire round about, and will be the glory in the midst of her.
Revelation 21:12 And had a wall great and high, [and] had twelve gates, and at the gates twelve angels, and names written thereon, which are [the names] of the twelve tribes of the children of Israel:

by:

Deuteronomy 3:11 For only Og king of Bashan remained of the remnant of giants; behold, his bedstead [was] a bedstead of iron; [is] it not in Rabbath of the children of Ammon? nine cubits [was] the length thereof, and four cubits the breadth of it, after the cubit of a man.

so he:

Ezekiel 42:20 He measured it by the four sides: it had a wall round about, five hundred [reeds] long, and five hundred broad, to make a separation between the sanctuary and the profane place.
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Dt 3:11. Ps 125:2. Is 26:1; 60:18. Ezk 42:20. Zc 2:5. Rv 21:12.

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