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Deuteronomy 5:6 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— I am Jehovah thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— I [am] the LORD thy God, which brought thee out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— ‘I am the LORD your God who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— I [am] the LORD thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— I am Jehovah thy God who have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— I, am Yahweh thy God, who have brought thee forth out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of servants:—
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— 'I Jehovah [am] thy God, who hath brought thee out from the land of Egypt, from a house of servants.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— I am the Lord thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— I am the LORD thy God, which brought thee out of the lande of Egypt, from the house of bondage.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— I am the Lord thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Mizraim{gr.Egypt}, out of the house of bondage.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— I [am] Yahweh thy Elohim, which brought thee out of the land of Mitzrayim, from the house of bondage.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
I x595
(0595) Complement
אָנֹכִי
'anokiy
{aw-no-kee'}
A primitive pronoun; I.
[am] Yhw יָהוֶה 3068
{3068} Prime
יְהֹוָה
Y@hovah
{yeh-ho-vaw'}
From H1961; (the) self Existent or eternal; Jehovah, Jewish national name of God.
thy lhm אֱלֹהִים, 430
{0430} Prime
אֱלֹהִים
'elohiym
{el-o-heem'}
Plural of H0433; gods in the ordinary sense; but specifically used (in the plural thus, especially with the article) of the supreme God; occasionally applied by way of deference to magistrates; and sometimes as a superlative.
which x834
(0834) Complement
אֲשֶׁר
'asher
{ash-er'}
A primitive relative pronoun (of every gender and number); who, which, what, that; also (as adverb and conjunction) when, where, how, because, in order that, etc.
brought x3318
(3318) Complement
יָצָא
yatsa'
{yaw-tsaw'}
A primitive root; to go (causatively bring) out, in a great variety of applications, literally and figuratively, direct and proximate.
thee out y3318
[3318] Standard
יָצָא
yatsa'
{yaw-tsaw'}
A primitive root; to go (causatively bring) out, in a great variety of applications, literally and figuratively, direct and proximate.
z8689
<8689> Grammar
Stem - Hiphil (See H8818)
Mood - Perfect (See H8816)
Count - 2675
of the land 776
{0776} Prime
אֶרֶץ
'erets
{eh'-rets}
From an unused root probably meaning to be firm; the earth (at large, or partitively a land).
x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
of Mixrayim מִצרַיִם, 4714
{4714} Prime
מִצְרַיִם
Mitsrayim
{mits-rah'-yim}
Dual of H4693; Mitsrajim, that is, Upper and Lower Egypt.
from the house 1004
{1004} Prime
בַּיִת
bayith
{bah'-yith}
Probably from H1129 abbreviated; a house (in the greatest variation of applications, especially family, etc.).
x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
of bondage. 5650
{5650} Prime
עֶבֶד
`ebed
{eh'-bed}
From H5647; a servant.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Deuteronomy 5:6-20

_ _ I am the Lord thy God — The word “Lord” is expressive of authority or dominion; and God, who by natural claim as well as by covenant relation was entitled to exercise supremacy over His people Israel, had a sovereign right to establish laws for their government. [See on Exodus 20:2.] The commandments which follow are, with a few slight verbal alterations, the same as formerly recorded (Exodus 20:1-17), and in some of them there is a distinct reference to that promulgation.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Deuteronomy 5:6-22

_ _ Here is the repetition of the ten commandments, in which observe, 1. Though they had been spoken before, and written, yet they are again rehearsed; for precept must be upon precept, and line upon line, and all little enough to keep the word of God in our minds and to preserve and renew the impressions of it. We have need to have the same things often inculcated upon us. See Philippians 3:1. 2. There is some variation here from that record (Ex. 20), as there is between the Lord's prayer as it is in Mt. 6 and as it is Lu. 11. In both it is more necessary that we tie ourselves to the things than to the words unalterably. 3. The most considerable variation is in the fourth commandment. In Ex. 20 the reason annexed is taken from the creation of the world; here it is taken from their deliverance out of Egypt, because that was typical of our redemption by Jesus Christ, in remembrance of which the Christian sabbath was to be observed: Remember that thou wast a servant, and God brought thee out, Deuteronomy 5:15. And Therefore, (1.) “It is fit that thy servants should be favoured by the sabbath-rest; for thou knowest the heart of a servant, and how welcome one day's ease will be after six days' labour.” (2.) “It is fit that thy God should be honoured by the sabbath-work, and the religious services of the day, in consideration of the great things he has done for thee.” In the resurrection of Christ we were brought into the glorious liberty of the children of God, with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm; therefore, by the gospel-edition of the law, we are directed to observe the first day of the week, in remembrance of that glorious work of power and grace. 4. It is added in the fifth commandment, That it may go well with thee, which addition the apostle quotes, and puts first (Ephesians 6:3), that it may be well with thee, and that thou mayest live long. If there be instances of some that have been very dutiful to their parents, and yet have not lived long upon earth, we may reconcile it to the promise by this explication of it, Whether they live long or no, it shall go well with them, either in this world or in a better. See Ecclesiastes 8:12. 5. The last five commandments are connected or coupled together, which they are not in Exodus: Neither shalt thou commit adultery, neither shalt thou steal, etc., which intimate that God's commands are all of a piece: the same authority that obliges us to one obliges us to another; and we must not be partial in the law, but have respect to all God's commandments, for he that offends in one point is guilty of all, James 2:10, James 2:11. 6. That these commandments were given with a great deal of awful solemnity, Deuteronomy 5:22. (1.) They were spoken with a great voice out of the fire, and thick darkness. That was a dispensation of terror, designed to make the gospel of grace the more welcome, and to be a specimen of the terrors of the judgment-day, Psalms 50:3, Psalms 50:4. (2.) He added no more. What other laws he gave them were sent by Moses, but no more were spoken in the same manner that the ten commandments were. He added no more, therefore we must not add: the law of the Lord is perfect. (3.) He wrote them in two tables of stone, that they might be preserved from corruption, and might be transmitted pure and entire to posterity, for whose use they were intended, as well as for the present generation. These being the heads of the covenant, the chest in which the written tables were deposited was called the ark of the covenant. See Revelation 11:19.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

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Geneva Bible Translation Notes

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Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
I am the:

Deuteronomy 4:4 But ye that did cleave unto the LORD your God [are] alive every one of you this day.
Exodus 20:2-17 I [am] the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. ... Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that [is] thy neighbour's.
Leviticus 26:1-2 Ye shall make you no idols nor graven image, neither rear you up a standing image, neither shall ye set up [any] image of stone in your land, to bow down unto it: for I [am] the LORD your God. ... Ye shall keep my sabbaths, and reverence my sanctuary: I [am] the LORD.

brought:

Psalms 81:5-10 This he ordained in Joseph [for] a testimony, when he went out through the land of Egypt: [where] I heard a language [that] I understood not. ... I [am] the LORD thy God, which brought thee out of the land of Egypt: open thy mouth wide, and I will fill it.

bondage:
Heb. servants
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Ex 20:2. Lv 26:1. Dt 4:4. Ps 81:5.

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