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Deuteronomy 2:8 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— So we passed by from our brethren the children of Esau, that dwell in Seir, from the way of the Arabah from Elath and from Ezion-geber. And we turned and passed by the way of the wilderness of Moab.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And when we passed by from our brethren the children of Esau, which dwelt in Seir, through the way of the plain from Elath, and from Eziongaber, we turned and passed by the way of the wilderness of Moab.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— “So we passed beyond our brothers the sons of Esau, who live in Seir, away from the Arabah road, away from Elath and from Ezion-geber. And we turned and passed through by the way of the wilderness of Moab.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And when we passed by from our brethren the children of Esau, who dwelt in Seir, through the way of the plain from Elath, and from Ezion-gaber, we turned and passed by the way of the wilderness of Moab.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And we passed by from our brethren the children of Esau, who dwelt in Seir, by the plain, by Elath, and by Ezion-geber, and we turned and passed by the way of the wilderness of Moab.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— So we passed on, away from our brethren the sons of Esau, who dwell in Seir, from the way of the waste plain, from Elath, and from Ezion-geber,—and we turned and passed on by way of the desert of Moab.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— 'And we pass by from our brethren, sons of Esau, who are dwelling in Seir, by the way of the plain, by Elath, and by Ezion-Gaber; and we turn, and pass over the way of the wilderness of Moab;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And when we had passed by our brethren the children of Esau, that dwelt in Seir, by the way of the plain from Elath and from Asiongaber, we came to the way that leadeth to the desert of Moab.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And when we passed by from our brethren the children of Esau, which dwelt in Seir, thorow the way of the plaine from Elath, and from Ezion-Gaber, wee turned and passed by the way of the wildernesse of Moab.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— And we passed by our brethren the children of Esau, who dwelt in Seir, by the way of Araba from Aijalon{gr.Aelon} and from Gesion Gaber; and we turned and passed by the way of the desert of Moab.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— And when we passed by from our brethren the children of Esaw, which dwelt in Seir, through the way of the plain from Elath, and from Etzyon Gaver, we turned and passed by the way of the wilderness of Moav.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And when we passed y5674
[5674] Standard
עָבַר
`abar
{aw-bar'}
A primitive root; to cross over; used very widely of any transition (literally or figuratively; transitively, intransitively, intensively or causatively); specifically to cover (in copulation).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
by x5674
(5674) Complement
עָבַר
`abar
{aw-bar'}
A primitive root; to cross over; used very widely of any transition (literally or figuratively; transitively, intransitively, intensively or causatively); specifically to cover (in copulation).
from x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
x854
(0854) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Probably from H0579; properly nearness (used only as a preposition or adverb), near; hence generally with, by, at, among, etc.
our brethren 251
{0251} Prime
אָח
'ach
{awkh}
A primitive word; a brother (used in the widest sense of literal relationship and metaphorical affinity or resemblance (like H0001)).
the children 1121
{1121} Prime
בֵּן
ben
{bane}
From H1129; a son (as a builder of the family name), in the widest sense (of literal and figurative relationship, including grandson, subject, nation, quality or condition, etc., (like H0001, H0251, etc.).
of `$w עֵשָׂו, 6215
{6215} Prime
עֵשָׂו
`Esav
{ay-sawv'}
Apparently a form of the passive participle of H6213 in the original sense of handling; rough (that is, sensibly felt); Esav, a son of Isaac, including his posterity.
which dwelt 3427
{3427} Prime
יָשַׁב
yashab
{yaw-shab'}
A primitive root; properly to sit down (specifically as judge, in ambush, in quiet); by implication to dwell, to remain; causatively to settle, to marry.
z8802
<8802> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Participle Active (See H8814)
Count - 5386
in `r שֵׂעִיר, 8165
{8165} Prime
שֵׂעִיר
Se`iyr
{say-eer'}
Formed like H8163; rough; Seir, a mountain of Idumaea and its aboriginal occupants, also one in Palestine.
through the way 1870
{1870} Prime
דֶּרֶךְ
derek
{deh'-rek}
From H1869; a road (as trodden); figuratively a course of life or mode of action, often adverbially.
x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
of the plain 6160
{6160} Prime
עֲרָבָה
`arabah
{ar-aw-baw'}
From H6150 (in the sense of sterility); a desert; especially (with the article prefixed) the (generally) sterile valley of the Jordan and its continuation to the Red Sea.
from la אֵילַת, 359
{0359} Prime
אֵילוֹת
'Eylowth
{ay-loth'}
From H0352; trees or a grove (that is, palms); Eloth or Elath, a place on the Red Sea.
x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
and from `Exyn Gver עֶציוֹן־גָּבֶר, 6100
{6100} Prime
עֶצְיוֹן גֶבֶר
`Etsyown Geber
{ets-yone' gheh'-ber}
From H6096 and H1397; backbone like of a man; Etsjon-Geber, a place on the Red Sea.
x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
we turned 6437
{6437} Prime
פָּנָה
panah
{paw-naw'}
A primitive root; to turn; by implication to face, that is, appear, look, etc.
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
and passed 5674
{5674} Prime
עָבַר
`abar
{aw-bar'}
A primitive root; to cross over; used very widely of any transition (literally or figuratively; transitively, intransitively, intensively or causatively); specifically to cover (in copulation).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
by the way 1870
{1870} Prime
דֶּרֶךְ
derek
{deh'-rek}
From H1869; a road (as trodden); figuratively a course of life or mode of action, often adverbially.
of the wilderness 4057
{4057} Prime
מִדְבָּר
midbar
{mid-bawr'}
From H1696 in the sense of driving; a pasture (that is, open field, whither cattle are driven); by implication a desert; also speech (including its organs).
of Mv מוֹאָב. 4124
{4124} Prime
מוֹאָב
Mow'ab
{mo-awb'}
From a prolonged form of the prepositional prefix 'm-' and H0001; from (her (the mother's)) father; Moab, an incestuous son of Lot; also his territory and descendants.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Deuteronomy 2:8-18

_ _ we passed ... through the way of the plain — the Arabah or great valley, from Elath (“trees”) (the Ailah of the Greeks and Romans). The site of it is marked by extensive mounds of rubbish.

_ _ Ezion-geber — now Akaba, both were within the territory of Edom; and after making a circuit of its southeastern boundary, the Israelites reached the border of Moab on the southeast of the Salt Sea. They had been forbidden by divine command to molest the Moabites in any way; and this special honor was conferred on that people not on their own account, for they were very wicked, but in virtue of their descent from Lot. (See on Deuteronomy 23:3). Their territory comprised the fine country on the south, and partly on the north of the Arnon. They had won it by their arms from the original inhabitants, the Emims, a race, terrible, as their name imports, for physical power and stature (Genesis 14:5), in like manner as the Edomites had obtained their settlement by the overthrow of the original occupiers of Seir, the Horims (Genesis 14:6), who were troglodytes, or dwellers in caves. Moses alluded to these circumstances to encourage his countrymen to believe that God would much more enable them to expel the wicked and accursed Canaanites. At that time, however, the Moabites, having lost the greater part of their possessions through the usurpations of Sihon, were reduced to the small but fertile region between the Zered and the Arnon.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Deuteronomy 2:8-23

_ _ It is observable here that Moses, speaking of the Edomites (Deuteronomy 2:8), calls them, “our brethren, the children of Esau.” Though they had been unkind to Israel, in refusing them a peaceable passage through their country, yet he calls them brethren. For, though our relations fail in their duty to us, we must retain a sense of the relation, and not be wanting in our duty to them, as there is occasion. Now in these verses we have,

_ _ I. The account which Moses gives of the origin of the nations of which he had here occasion to speak, the Moabites, Edomites, and Ammonites. We know very well, from other parts of his history, whose posterity they were; but here he tells us how they came to those countries in which Israel found them; they were not the aborigines, or first planters. But, 1. The Moabites dwelt in a country which had belonged to a numerous race of giants, called Emim (that is, terrible ones), as tall as the Anakim, and perhaps more fierce, Deuteronomy 2:10, Deuteronomy 2:11. 2. The Edomites in like manner dispossessed the Horim from Mount Seir, and took their country (Deuteronomy 2:12. and again Deuteronomy 2:22), of which we read, Genesis 36:20. 3. The Ammonites likewise got possession of a country that had formerly been inhabited by giants, called Zamzummim, crafty men, or wicked men (Deuteronomy 2:20, Deuteronomy 2:21), probably the same that are called Zuzim, Genesis 14:5. He illustrates these remarks by an instance older than any of these; the Caphtorim (who were akin to the Philistines, Genesis 10:14) drove the Avim out of their country, and took possession of it, Deuteronomy 2:23. The learned bishop Patrick supposes these Avites, being expelled hence, to have settled in Assyria, and to be the same people we read of under that name, 2 Kings 17:31. Now these revolutions are recorded, (1.) To show how soon the world was peopled after the flood, so well peopled that, when a family grew numerous, they could not find a place to settle in, at least in that part of the world, but they must drive out those that were already settled. (2.) To show that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong. Giants were expelled by those of ordinary stature; for probably these giants, like those before the flood (Genesis 6:4), were notorious for impiety and oppression, which brought the judgments of God upon them, against which their great strength would be on defence. (3.) To show what uncertain things worldly possessions are, and how often they change their owners; it was so of old, and ever will be so. Families decline, and from them estates are transferred to families that increase; so little constancy or continuance is there in these things. (4.) To encourage the children of Israel, who were now going to take possession of Canaan, against the difficulties they would meet with, and to show the unbelief of those that were afraid of the sons of Anak, to whom the giants, here said to be conquered, are compared, Deuteronomy 2:11, Deuteronomy 2:21. If the providence of God had done this for the Moabites and Ammonites, much more would his promise do it for Israel his peculiar people.

_ _ II. The advances which Israel made towards Canaan. They passed by the way of the wilderness of Moab (Deuteronomy 2:8), and then went over the brook or vale of Zered (Deuteronomy 2:13), and there Moses takes notice of the fulfilling of the word which God had spoken concerning them, that none of those that were numbered at Mount Sinai should see the land that God had promised, Numbers 14:23. According to that sentence, now that they began to set their faces towards Canaan, and to have it in their eye, notice is taken of their being all destroyed and consumed, and not a man of them left, Deuteronomy 2:14. Common providence, we may observe, in about thirty-eight years, ordinarily raises a new generation, so that in that time few remain of the old one; but here it was entirely new, and none at all remained but Caleb and Joshua: for indeed the hand of the Lord was against them, v. 15. Those cannot but waste, until they were consumed, who have the hand of God against them. Observe, Israel is not called to engage with the Canaanites till all the men of war, the veteran regiments, that had been used to hardship, and had learned the art of war from the Egyptians, were consumed and dead from among the people (v. 16), that the conquest of Canaan, being effected by a host of new-raised men, trained up in a wilderness, the excellency of the power might the more plainly appear to be of God and not of men.

_ _ III. The caution given them not to meddle with the Moabites or Ammonites, whom they must not disseize, nor so much as disturb in their possessions: Distress them not, nor contend with them, v. 9. Though the Moabites aimed to ruin Israel (Numbers 22:6), yet Israel must not aim to ruin them. If others design us a mischief, this will not justify us in designing them a mischief. But why must not the Moabites and Ammonites be meddled with? 1. Because they were the children of Lot (v. 9, 19), righteous Lot, who kept his integrity in Sodom. Note, Children often fare the better in this world for the piety of their ancestors: the seed of the upright, though they degenerate, yet are blessed with temporal good things. 2. Because the land they were possessed of was what God had given them, and he did not design it for Israel. Even wicked men have a right to their worldly possessions, and must not be wronged. The tares are allowed their place in the field, and must not be rooted out until the harvest. God gives and preserves outward blessings to wicked men, to show that these are not the best things, but he has better in store for his own children.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Deuteronomy 2:8

We turned — From our direct road which lay through Edom.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

[[no comment]]

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
And when:

Numbers 20:20-21 And he said, Thou shalt not go through. And Edom came out against him with much people, and with a strong hand. ... Thus Edom refused to give Israel passage through his border: wherefore Israel turned away from him.
Judges 11:18 Then they went along through the wilderness, and compassed the land of Edom, and the land of Moab, and came by the east side of the land of Moab, and pitched on the other side of Arnon, but came not within the border of Moab: for Arnon [was] the border of Moab.

Elath:

1 Kings 9:26 And king Solomon made a navy of ships in Eziongeber, which [is] beside Eloth, on the shore of the Red sea, in the land of Edom.
, Eloth,
2 Kings 14:22 He built Elath, and restored it to Judah, after that the king slept with his fathers.
2 Kings 16:6 At that time Rezin king of Syria recovered Elath to Syria, and drave the Jews from Elath: and the Syrians came to Elath, and dwelt there unto this day.
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Nu 20:20. Jg 11:18. 1K 9:26. 2K 14:22; 16:6.

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