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Deuteronomy 1:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— These are the words which Moses spake unto all Israel beyond the Jordan in the wilderness, in the Arabah over against Suph, between Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Di-zahab.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— These [be] the words which Moses spake unto all Israel on this side Jordan in the wilderness, in the plain over against the Red [sea], between Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Dizahab.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— These are the words which Moses spoke to all Israel across the Jordan in the wilderness, in the Arabah opposite Suph, between Paran and Tophel and Laban and Hazeroth and Dizahab.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— These [are] the words which Moses spoke to all Israel on the east side of Jordan in the wilderness, in the plain over against Suf, between Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Dizahab.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— These are the words which Moses spoke to all Israel on this side the Jordan, in the wilderness, in the plain, opposite to Suph, between Paran and Tophel, Laban, Hazeroth, and Dizahab.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— These, are the words, which Moses spake unto all Israel, over the Jordan,—in the wilderness, in the waste plain over against Suph, between Paran and Tophel, and Laban and Hazeroth, and Di-zahab:
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— These [are] the words which Moses hath spoken unto all Israel, beyond the Jordan, in the wilderness, in the plain over-against Suph, between Paran and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Di-Zahab;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— These are the words, which Moses spoke to all Israel beyond the Jordan, in the plain wilderness, over against the Red Sea, between Pharan and Thophel and Laban and Haseroth, where there is very much gold.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— These [bee] the woordes which Moses spake vnto all Israel, on this side Iordane in the wildernes, in the plaine ouer against the Red [sea], betweene Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Dizahab.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— These [are] the words which Mosheh{gr.Moses} spoke to all Israel on this side Jordan in the desert towards the west near the Red Sea, between Paran{gr.Pharan} Tophol, and Lobon, and Aulon, and the gold works.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— These [be] the words which Mosheh spake unto all Yisrael on this side Yarden in the wilderness, in the plain over against the Suf [sea], between Paran, and Tofel, and Lavan, and Chatzeroth, and Di Zahav.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
These x428
(0428) Complement
אֵלֶּה
'el-leh
{ale'-leh}
Prolonged from H0411; these or those.
[be] the words 1697
{1697} Prime
דָּבָר
dabar
{daw-baw'}
From H1696; a word; by implication a matter (as spoken of) or thing; adverbially a cause.
which x834
(0834) Complement
אֲשֶׁר
'asher
{ash-er'}
A primitive relative pronoun (of every gender and number); who, which, what, that; also (as adverb and conjunction) when, where, how, because, in order that, etc.
M מֹשֶׁה 4872
{4872} Prime
מֹשֶׁה
Mosheh
{mo-sheh'}
From H4871; drawing out (of the water), that is, rescued; Mosheh, the Israelitish lawgiver.
spake 1696
{1696} Prime
דִּבֵּר
dabar
{daw-bar'}
A primitive root; perhaps properly to arrange; but used figuratively (of words) to speak; rarely (in a destructive sense) to subdue.
z8765
<8765> Grammar
Stem - Piel (See H8840)
Mood - Perfect (See H8816)
Count - 2121
unto x413
(0413) Complement
אֵל
'el
{ale}
(Used only in the shortened constructive form (the second form)); a primitive particle, properly denoting motion towards, but occasionally used of a quiescent position, that is, near, with or among; often in general, to.
all x3605
(3605) Complement
כֹּל
kol
{kole}
From H3634; properly the whole; hence all, any or every (in the singular only, but often in a plural sense).
Yi$rl יִשׂרָאֵל 3478
{3478} Prime
יִשְׂרָאֵל
Yisra'el
{yis-raw-ale'}
From H8280 and H0410; he will rule as God; Jisrael, a symbolical name of Jacob; also (typically) of his posterity.
on this side 5676
{5676} Prime
עֵבֶר
`eber
{ay'-ber}
From H5674; properly a region across; but used only adverbially (with or without a preposition) on the opposite side (especially of the Jordan; usually meaning the east).
Yardn יַרדֵּן 3383
{3383} Prime
יַרְדֵּן
Yarden
{yar-dane'}
From H3381; a descender; Jarden, the principal river of Palestine.
in the wilderness, 4057
{4057} Prime
מִדְבָּר
midbar
{mid-bawr'}
From H1696 in the sense of driving; a pasture (that is, open field, whither cattle are driven); by implication a desert; also speech (including its organs).
in the plain 6160
{6160} Prime
עֲרָבָה
`arabah
{ar-aw-baw'}
From H6150 (in the sense of sterility); a desert; especially (with the article prefixed) the (generally) sterile valley of the Jordan and its continuation to the Red Sea.
over against 4136
{4136} Prime
מוּל
muwl
{mool}
From H4135; properly abrupt, that is, a precipice; by implication the front; used only adverbially (with prepositional prefix) opposite.
the Sf סוּף 5489
{5489} Prime
סוּף
Cuwph
{soof}
For H5488 (by ellipsis of H3220); the Reed (Sea).
[sea], between x996
(0996) Complement
בַּיִן
beyn
{bane}
(Sometimes in the plural masculine or feminine); properly the constructively contracted form of an otherwise unused noun from H0995; a distinction; but used only as a preposition, between (repeated before each noun, often with other particles); also as a conjugation, either... or.
Prn פָּארָן, 6290
{6290} Prime
פָּארָן
Pa'ran
{paw-rawn'}
From H6286; ornamental; Paran, a desert of Arabia.
and Tfel תֹּפֶל, 8603
{8603} Prime
תֹּפֶל
Tophel
{to'-fel}
From the same as H8602; quagmire; Tophel, a place near the Desert.
and Lvn לָבָן, 3837
{3837} Prime
לָבָן
Laban
{law-bawn'}
The same as H3836; Laban, a Mesopotamian; also a place in the Desert.
and xr חֲצֵרוֹת, 2698
{2698} Prime
חֲצֵרוֹת
Chatserowth
{khats-ay-roth'}
Feminine plural of H2691; yards; Chatseroth, a place in Palestine.
and D Zhv דִּי־זָהָב. 1774
{1774} Prime
דִּי זָהָב
Diy zahab
{dee zaw-hawb'}
As if from H1768 and H2091; of gold; Dizahab, a place in the Desert.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Deuteronomy 1:1

_ _ Deuteronomy 1:1-46. Moses’ speech at the end of the fortieth year.

_ _ These be the words which Moses spake unto all Israel — The mental condition of the people generally in that infantine age of the Church, and the greater number of them being of young or tender years, rendered it expedient to repeat the laws and counsels which God had given. Accordingly, to furnish a recapitulation of the leading branches of their faith and duty was among the last public services which Moses rendered to Israel. The scene of their delivery was on the plains of Moab where the encampment was pitched

_ _ on this side Jordan — or, as the Hebrew word may be rendered “on the bank of the Jordan.”

_ _ in the wilderness, in the plain — the Arabah, a desert plain, or steppe, extended the whole way from the Red Sea north to the Sea of Tiberias. While the high tablelands of Moab were “cultivated fields,” the Jordan valley, at the foot of the mountains where Israel was encamped, was a part of the great desert plain, little more inviting than the desert of Arabia. The locale is indicated by the names of the most prominent places around it. Some of these places are unknown to us. The Hebrew word, Suph, “red” (for “sea,” which our translators have inserted, is not in the original, and Moses was now farther from the Red Sea than ever), probably meant a place noted for its reeds (Numbers 21:14).

_ _ Tophel — identified as Tafyle or Tafeilah, lying between Bozrah and Kerak.

_ _ Hazeroth — is a different place from that at which the Israelites encamped after leaving “the desert of Sinai.”

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Deuteronomy 1:1-8

_ _ We have here, I. The date of this sermon which Moses preached to the people of Israel. A great auditory, no question, he had, as many as could crowd within hearing, and particularly all the elders and officers, the representatives of the people; and, probably, it was on the sabbath day that he delivered this to them. 1. The place were they were now encamped was in the plain, in the land of Moab (Deuteronomy 1:1, Deuteronomy 1:5), where they were just ready to enter Canaan, and engage in a war with the Canaanites. Yet he discourses not to them concerning military affairs, the arts and stratagems of war, but concerning their duty to God; for, if they kept themselves in his fear and favour, he would secure to them the conquest of the land: their religion would be their best policy. 2. The time was near the end of the fortieth year since they came out of Egypt. So long God had borne their manners, and they had borne their own iniquity (Numbers 14:34), and now that a new and more pleasant scene was to be introduced, as a token for good, Moses repeats the law to them. Thus, after God's controversy with them on account of the golden calf, the first and surest sign of God's being reconciled to them was the renewing of the tables. There is no better evidence and earnest of God's favour than his putting his law in our hearts, Psalms 147:19, Psalms 147:20.

_ _ II. The discourse itself. In general, Moses spoke unto them all that the Lord had given him in commandment (Deuteronomy 1:3), which intimates, not only that what he now delivered was for substance the same with what had formerly been commanded, but that it was what God now commanded him to repeat. He gave them this rehearsal and exhortation purely by divine direction; God appointed him to leave this legacy to the church. He begins his narrative with their removal from Mount Sinai (Deuteronomy 1:6), and relates here, 1. The orders which God gave them to decamp, and proceed in their march (Deuteronomy 1:6, Deuteronomy 1:7): You have dwelt long enough in this mount. This was the mount that burned with fire (Hebrews 12:18), and gendered to bandage, Galatians 4:24. Thither God brought them to humble them, and by the terrors of the law to prepare them for the land of promise. There he kept them about a year, and then told them they had dwelt long enough there, they must go forward. Though God brings his people into trouble and affliction, into spiritual trouble and affliction of mind, he knows when they have dwelt long enough in it, and will certainly find a time, the fittest time, to advance them from the terrors of the spirit of adoption. See Romans 8:15. 2. The prospect which he gave them of a happy and early settlement in Canaan: Go to the land of the Canaanites (Deuteronomy 1:7); enter and take possession, it is all your own. Behold I have set the land before you, Deuteronomy 1:8. When God commands us to go forward in our Christian course he sets the heavenly Canaan before us for our encouragement.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Deuteronomy 1:1

All Israel — Namely, by the heads or elders of the several tribes, who were to communicate these discourses to all the people. In the wilderness — In the plain of Moab, as may appear by comparing this with Deuteronomy 1:5, and Numbers 22:1, and Deuteronomy 34:8. The word Suph here used does not signify the Red — Sea, which is commonly called jam — suph, and which was at too great a distance, but some oiher place now unknown to us, (as also most of the following places are) so called from the reeds or flags, or rushes (which that word signifies) that grew in or near it. Paran — Not that Numbers 10:12, which there and elsewhere is called the Wilderness of Paran, and which was too remote, but some other place called by the same name. Laban, Hazeroth, and Dizahab — These places seem to be the several bounds, not of the whole country of Moab, but of the plain of Moab, where Moses now was.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Deuteronomy 1:1

These [be] the words which Moses spake unto all Israel on (a) this side Jordan in the wilderness, in the plain (b) over against the Red [sea], between Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Dizahab.

The Argument — The wonderful love of God toward his Church is actively set forth in this book. Even through their ingratitude and many rebellions against God, for the space forty years. (Deuteronomy 9:7) they deserved to have been cut off from the number of his people, and forever to have been deprived of the use of his holy word and ordinances: yet he ever preserved his Church even for his own mercy's sake, and would still have his name called upon among them. Wherefore he brings them into the land of Canaan, destroys their enemies, gives them their country, towns and goods, and exhorts them by the example of their fathers (whose infidelity, idolatry, adulteries, complaining and rebellions, he had most severely punished) to fear and obey the Lord, to embrace and keep his law without adding to it or diminishing from it. For by his word he would be known to be their God, and they his people, by his word he would govern his Church, and by the same they would learn to obey him: by his word he would discern the false prophet from the true, light form darkness, ignorance from knowledge, and his own people from all the other nations and infidels: teaching them by it to refuse and detest, destroy and abolish whatever is not agreeable to his holy will, seem it otherwise never so good or precious in the eyes of man. For this cause God promised to raise up kings and governors, for the setting forth of his word and preservation of his Church: giving to them a special charge for the executing of it: whom therefore he wills to exercise themselves diligently in the continual study and meditation of the same: that they might learn to fear the Lord, love their subjects, abhor covetousness and vices, and whatever offends the majesty of God. As he had before instructed their fathers in all things belonging both to his spiritual service and also for the maintenance of that society which is between men: so he prescribes here anew all such laws and ordinances, which either concern his divine service, or else are necessary for a common good: appointing to every estate and degree their charge and duty: as well, how to rule and live in the fear of God, as to nourish friendship toward their neighbours, and to preserve the order which God has established among men: threatening most horrible plagues to them that transgress his commandments, and promising blessings and happiness to those who observe and obey them.

(a) In the country of Moab.

(b) So that the wilderness was between the sea and the plain of Moab.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
on this:

Numbers 32:5 Wherefore, said they, if we have found grace in thy sight, let this land be given unto thy servants for a possession, [and] bring us not over Jordan.
Numbers 32:19 For we will not inherit with them on yonder side Jordan, or forward; because our inheritance is fallen to us on this side Jordan eastward.
Numbers 32:32 We will pass over armed before the LORD into the land of Canaan, that the possession of our inheritance on this side Jordan [may be] ours.
Numbers 34:15 The two tribes and the half tribe have received their inheritance on this side Jordan [near] Jericho eastward, toward the sunrising.
Numbers 35:14 Ye shall give three cities on this side Jordan, and three cities shall ye give in the land of Canaan, [which] shall be cities of refuge.
Joshua 9:1 And it came to pass, when all the kings which [were] on this side Jordan, in the hills, and in the valleys, and in all the coasts of the great sea over against Lebanon, the Hittite, and the Amorite, the Canaanite, the Perizzite, the Hivite, and the Jebusite, heard [thereof];
Joshua 9:10 And all that he did to the two kings of the Amorites, that [were] beyond Jordan, to Sihon king of Heshbon, and to Og king of Bashan, which [was] at Ashtaroth.
Joshua 22:4 And now the LORD your God hath given rest unto your brethren, as he promised them: therefore now return ye, and get you unto your tents, [and] unto the land of your possession, which Moses the servant of the LORD gave you on the other side Jordan.
Joshua 22:7 Now to the [one] half of the tribe of Manasseh Moses had given [possession] in Bashan: but unto the [other] half thereof gave Joshua among their brethren on this side Jordan westward. And when Joshua sent them away also unto their tents, then he blessed them,

Red Sea:
or, Zuph, Or rather, Suph, This could not have been the Red Sea, not only because the word yam, "sea," is not joined with it as usual, but because they were now east of Jordan, and farther from the Red Sea than ever. It seems to be the same which is called Suphah in
Numbers 21:14 Wherefore it is said in the book of the wars of the LORD, What he did in the Red sea, and in the brooks of Arnon,
; which must necessarily signify some place in or adjoining to the plains of Moab, and not far from the Jordan and Arnon. Ptolemy mentions a people called Sophonites that dwelt in Arabia Petrea, who may have taken their name from this place.

Paran:
Paran, Tophel, Laban, Hazeroth, and Dizahab, seem to have been either places or cities not far from the plains of Moab; for it is evident that Paran and Hazeroth could not have been those near the Red sea, and not far from Horeb.
Deuteronomy 33:2 And he said, The LORD came from Sinai, and rose up from Seir unto them; he shined forth from mount Paran, and he came with ten thousands of saints: from his right hand [went] a fiery law for them.
Genesis 21:21 And he dwelt in the wilderness of Paran: and his mother took him a wife out of the land of Egypt.
Numbers 10:12 And the children of Israel took their journeys out of the wilderness of Sinai; and the cloud rested in the wilderness of Paran.
Numbers 12:16 And afterward the people removed from Hazeroth, and pitched in the wilderness of Paran.
Numbers 13:3 And Moses by the commandment of the LORD sent them from the wilderness of Paran: all those men [were] heads of the children of Israel.
Numbers 13:26 And they went and came to Moses, and to Aaron, and to all the congregation of the children of Israel, unto the wilderness of Paran, to Kadesh; and brought back word unto them, and unto all the congregation, and shewed them the fruit of the land.
1 Samuel 25:1 And Samuel died; and all the Israelites were gathered together, and lamented him, and buried him in his house at Ramah. And David arose, and went down to the wilderness of Paran.
Habakkuk 3:3 God came from Teman, and the Holy One from mount Paran. Selah. His glory covered the heavens, and the earth was full of his praise.

Hazeroth:

Numbers 11:35 [And] the people journeyed from Kibrothhattaavah unto Hazeroth; and abode at Hazeroth.
Numbers 33:17-18 And they departed from Kibrothhattaavah, and encamped at Hazeroth. ... And they departed from Hazeroth, and pitched in Rithmah.
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Gn 21:21. Nu 10:12; 11:35; 12:16; 13:3, 26; 21:14; 32:5, 19, 32; 33:17; 34:15; 35:14. Dt 33:2. Jsh 9:1, 10; 22:4, 7. 1S 25:1. Hab 3:3.

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