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Acts 9:9 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And he was three days without sight, and did neither eat nor drink.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And he was three days without sight, and neither did eat nor drink.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— And he was three days without sight, and neither ate nor drank.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And he was three days without sight, and neither ate nor drank.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And he was three days without seeing, and neither ate nor drank.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And he was three days without seeing, and did neither eat nor drink.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— and he was three days without seeing, and he did neither eat nor drink.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And he was there three days without sight: and he did neither eat nor drink.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And he was three dayes without sight, and neither did eate, nor drinke.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— and he saw not for three days, neither did he eat or drink.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And he had no sight for three days; and he neither ate nor drank.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
he was 2258
{2258} Prime
ἦν
en
{ane}
Imperfect of G1510; I (thou, etc.) was (wast or were).
z5713
<5713> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 532
three 5140
{5140} Prime
τρεῖς
treis
{trice}
A primary (plural) number; 'three'.
days 2250
{2250} Prime
ἡμέρα
hemera
{hay-mer'-ah}
Feminine (with G5610 implied) of a derivative of ἧμαι [[hemai]] (to sit; akin to the base of G1476) meaning tame, that is, gentle; day, that is, (literally) the time space between dawn and dark, or the whole 24 hours (but several days were usually reckoned by the Jews as inclusive of the parts of both extremes); figuratively a period (always defined more or less clearly by the context).
without 3361
{3361} Prime
μή
me
{may}
A primary particle of qualified negation (whereas G3756 expresses an absolute denial); (adverbially) not, (conjugationally) lest; also (as interrogitive implying a negative answer [whereas G3756 expects an affirmative one]); whether.
sight, 991
{0991} Prime
βλέπω
blepo
{blep'-o}
A primary verb; to look at (literally or figuratively).
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
neither 3756
{3756} Prime
οὐ
ou
{oo}
A primary word; the absolutely negative (compare G3361) adverb; no or not.
did eat 5315
{5315} Prime
φάγω
phago
{fag'-o}
A primary verb (used as an alternate of G2068 in certain tenses); to eat (literally or figuratively).
z5627
<5627> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2138 plus 1 in a variant reading in a footnote
nor 3761
{3761} Prime
οὐδέ
oude
{oo-deh'}
From G3756 and G1161; not however, that is, neither, nor, not even.
drink. 4095
{4095} Prime
πίνω
pino
{pee'-no}
The first is a prolonged form of the second, which (together with the third form) occurs only as an alternate in certain tenses; to imbibe (literally or figuratively).
z5627
<5627> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2138 plus 1 in a variant reading in a footnote
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Acts 9:9

_ _ And he was three days without sight, and neither did eat nor drink — that is, according to the Hebrew mode of computation: he took no food during the remainder of that day, the entire day following, and so much of the subsequent day as elapsed before the visit of Ananias. Such a period of entire abstinence from food, in that state of mental absorption and revolution into which he had been so suddenly thrown, is in perfect harmony with known laws and numerous facts. But what three days those must have been! “Only one other space of three days’ duration can be mentioned of equal importance in the history of the world” [Howson]. Since Jesus had been revealed not only to his eyes but to his soul (see on Galatians 1:15, Galatians 1:16), the double conviction must have immediately flashed upon him, that his whole reading of the Old Testament hitherto had been wrong, and that the system of legal righteousness in which he had, up to that moment, rested and prided himself was false and fatal. What materials these for spiritual exercise during those three days of total darkness, fasting, and solitude! On the one hand, what self-condemnation, what anguish, what death of legal hope, what difficulty in believing that in such a case there could be hope at all; on the other hand, what heartbreaking admiration of the grace that had “pulled him out of the fire,” what resistless conviction that there must be a purpose of love in it, and what tender expectation of being yet honored, as a chosen vessel, to declare what the Lord had done for his soul, and to spread abroad the savor of that Name which he had so wickedly, though ignorantly, sought to destroy — must have struggled in his breast during those memorable days! Is it too much to say that all that profound insight into the Old Testament, that comprehensive grasp of the principles of the divine economy, that penetrating spirituality, that vivid apprehension of man’s lost state, and those glowing views of the perfection and glory of the divine remedy, that beautiful ideal of the loftiness and the lowliness of the Christian character, that large philanthropy and burning zeal to spend and be spent through all his future life for Christ, which distinguish the writings of this chiefest of the apostles and greatest of men, were all quickened into life during those three successive days?

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Acts 9:1-9.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Acts 9:9

And he was three days — An important season! So long he seems to have been in the pangs of the new birth. Without sight — By scales growing over his eyes, to intimate to him the blindness of the state he had been in, to impress him with a deeper sense of the almighty power of Christ, and to turn his thoughts inward, while he was less capable of conversing with outward objects. This was likewise a manifest token to others, of what had happened to him in his journey, and ought to have humbled and convinced those bigoted Jews, to whom he had been sent from the sanhedrim.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

[[no comment]]

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance

Acts 9:11-12 And the Lord [said] unto him, Arise, and go into the street which is called Straight, and enquire in the house of Judas for [one] called Saul, of Tarsus: for, behold, he prayeth, ... And hath seen in a vision a man named Ananias coming in, and putting [his] hand on him, that he might receive his sight.
2 Chronicles 33:12-13 And when he was in affliction, he besought the LORD his God, and humbled himself greatly before the God of his fathers, ... And prayed unto him: and he was intreated of him, and heard his supplication, and brought him again to Jerusalem into his kingdom. Then Manasseh knew that the LORD he [was] God.
2 Chronicles 33:18-19 Now the rest of the acts of Manasseh, and his prayer unto his God, and the words of the seers that spake to him in the name of the LORD God of Israel, behold, they [are written] in the book of the kings of Israel. ... His prayer also, and [how God] was intreated of him, and all his sin, and his trespass, and the places wherein he built high places, and set up groves and graven images, before he was humbled: behold, they [are] written among the sayings of the seers.
Esther 4:16 Go, gather together all the Jews that are present in Shushan, and fast ye for me, and neither eat nor drink three days, night or day: I also and my maidens will fast likewise; and so will I go in unto the king, which [is] not according to the law: and if I perish, I perish.
Jonah 3:6-8 For word came unto the king of Nineveh, and he arose from his throne, and he laid his robe from him, and covered [him] with sackcloth, and sat in ashes. ... But let man and beast be covered with sackcloth, and cry mightily unto God: yea, let them turn every one from his evil way, and from the violence that [is] in their hands.
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2Ch 33:12, 18. Es 4:16. Jna 3:6. Ac 9:11.

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