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Acts 28:31 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— preaching the kingdom of God, and teaching the things concerning the Lord Jesus Christ with all boldness, none forbidding him.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Preaching the kingdom of God, and teaching those things which concern the Lord Jesus Christ, with all confidence, no man forbidding him.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— preaching the kingdom of God and teaching concerning the Lord Jesus Christ with all openness, unhindered.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Preaching the kingdom of God, and teaching those things which concern the Lord Jesus Christ, with all confidence, no man forbidding him.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— preaching the kingdom of God, and teaching the things concerning the Lord Jesus Christ, with all freedom unhinderedly.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— proclaiming the kingdom of God, and teaching the things concerning the Lord Jesus Christ, with all freedom of speech, without hindrance.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— preaching the reign of God, and teaching the things concerning the Lord Jesus Christ with all boldness—unforbidden.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Preaching the kingdom of God and teaching the things which concern the Lord Jesus Christ, with all confidence, without prohibition.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Preaching the kingdome of God, and teaching those things which concerne the Lord Iesus Christ, with all confidence, no man forbidding him.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And he preached concerning the kingdom of Aloha, and taught with confidence concerning our Lord Jeshu Meshiha, none forbidding.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And he preached concerning the kingdom of God, and taught boldly concerning our Lord Jesus Messiah, without hinderance.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Preaching 2784
{2784} Prime
κηρύσσω
kerusso
{kay-roos'-so}
Of uncertain affinity; to herald (as a public crier), especially divine truth (the gospel).
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
kingdom 932
{0932} Prime
βασιλεία
basileia
{bas-il-i'-ah}
From G0935; properly royalty, that is, (abstractly) rule, or (concretely) a realm (literally or figuratively).
of God, 2316
{2316} Prime
θεός
theos
{theh'-os}
Of uncertain affinity; a deity, especially (with G3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively a magistrate; by Hebraism very.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
teaching 1321
{1321} Prime
διδάσκω
didasko
{did-as'-ko}
A prolonged (causative) form of a primary verb δάω [[dao]] (to learn); to teach (in the same broad application).
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
those things x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
which concern 4012
{4012} Prime
περί
peri
{per-ee'}
From the base of G4008; properly through (all over), that is, around; figuratively with respect to; used in various applications, of place, cause or time (with the genitive case denoting the subject or occasion or superlative point; with the accusative case the locality, circuit, matter, circumstance or general period).
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
Lord 2962
{2962} Prime
κύριος
kurios
{koo'-ree-os}
From κῦρος [[kuros]] (supremacy); supreme in authority, that is, (as noun) controller; by implication Mr. (as a respectful title).
Jesus 2424
{2424} Prime
Ἰησοῦς
Iesous
{ee-ay-sooce'}
Of Hebrew origin [H3091]; Jesus (that is, Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites.
Christ, 5547
{5547} Prime
Χριστός
Christos
{khris-tos'}
From G5548; anointed, that is, the Messiah, an epithet of Jesus.
with 3326
{3326} Prime
μετά
meta
{met-ah'}
A primary preposition (often used adverbially); properly denoting accompaniment; 'amid' (local or causal); modified variously according to the case (genitive case association, or accusative case succession) with which it is joined; occupying an intermediate position between G0575 or G1537 and G1519 or G4314; less intimate than G1722, and less close than G4862).
all 3956
{3956} Prime
πᾶς
pas
{pas}
Including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole.
confidence, 3954
{3954} Prime
παρρησία
parrhesia
{par-rhay-see'-ah}
From G3956 and a derivative of G4483; all out spokenness, that is, frankness, bluntness, publicity; by implication assurance.
no man forbidding him. 209
{0209} Prime
ἀκωλύτως
akolutos
{ak-o-loo'-toce}
Adverb from a compound of G0001 (as a negative particle) and a derivative of G2967; in an unhindered manner, that is, freely.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Acts 28:31

_ _ with all confidence, no man forbidding him — enjoying, in the uninterrupted exercise of his ministry, all the liberty of a guarded man. Thus closes this most precious monument of the beginnings of the Christian Church in its march from east to west, among the Jews first, whose center was Jerusalem; next among the Gentiles, with Antioch for its headquarters; finally, its banner is seen waving over imperial Rome, foretokening its universal triumphs. That distinguished apostle whose conversion, labors, and sufferings for “the faith which once he destroyed” occupy more than half of this History, it leaves a prisoner, unheard, so far as appears, for two years. His accusers, whose presence was indispensable, would have to await the return of spring before starting for the capital, and might not reach it for many months; nor, even when there, would they be so sanguine of success — after Felix, Festus, and Agrippa had all pronounced him innocent — as to be impatient of delay. And if witnesses were required to prove the charge advanced by Tertullus, that he was “a mover of sedition among all the Jews throughout the [Roman] world” (Acts 24:5), they must have seen that unless considerable time was allowed them the case would certainly break down. If to this be added the capricious delays which the emperor himself might interpose, and the practice of Nero to hear but one charge at a time, it will not seem strange that the historian should have no proceedings in the case to record for two years. Begun, probably, before the apostle’s arrival, its progress at Rome under his own eye would furnish exalted employment, and beguile many a tedious hour of his two years’ imprisonment. Had the case come on for hearing during this period, much more if it had been disposed of, it is hardly conceivable that the History should have closed as it does. But if, at the end of this period, the Narrative only wanted the decision of the case, while hope deferred was making the heart sick (Proverbs 13:12), and if, under the guidance of that Spirit whose seal was on it all, it seemed of more consequence to put the Church at once in possession of this History than to keep it back indefinitely for the sake of what might come to be otherwise known, we cannot wonder that it should be wound up as it is in its two concluding verses. All that we know of the apostle’s proceedings and history beyond this must be gathered from the Epistles of the Imprisonment — Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon — written during this period, and the Pastoral Epistles — to Timothy and Titus, which, in our judgment, are of subsequent date. From the former class of Epistles we learn the following particulars: (1) That the trying restraint laid upon the apostle’s labors by his imprisonment had only turned his influence into a new channel; the Gospel having in consequence penetrated even into the palace, and pervaded the city, while the preachers of Christ were emboldened; and though the Judaizing portion of them, observing his success among the Gentiles, had been led to inculcate with fresh zeal their own narrower Gospel, even this had done much good by extending the truth common to both (See on Philippians 1:12-18; see on Philippians 4:22); (2) That as in addition to all his other labors, “the care of all the churches pressed upon him from day to-day” (2 Corinthians 11:28), so with these churches he kept up an active correspondence by means of letters and messages, and on such errands he lacked not faithful and beloved brethren enough ready to be employed — Luke; Timotheus; Tychicus; (John) Mark; Demas; Aristarchus; Epaphras; Onesimus; Jesus, called Justus; and, for a short time, Epaphroditus (See on Colossians 4:7; see on Colossians 4:9-12; see on Colossians 4:14; see on Philemon 1:23, Philemon 1:24; see on Introduction to Ephesians, see on Introduction to Philippians, and see on Introduction to Philemon). That the apostle suffered martyrdom under Nero at Rome has never been doubted. But that the appeal which brought him to Rome issued in his liberation, that he was at large for some years thereafter and took some wide missionary circuits, and that he was again arrested, carried to Rome, and then executed — was the undisputed belief of the early Church, as expressed by Chrysostom, Jerome, and Eusebius, in the fourth century, up to Clement of Rome, the “fellow laborer” of the apostle himself (Philippians 4:3), in the first century. The strongest possible confirmation of this is found in the Pastoral Epistles, which bear marks throughout of a more advanced state of the Church, and more matured forms of error, than can well have existed at any period before the appeal which brought the apostle to Rome; which refer to movements of himself and Timothy that cannot without some straining (as we think) be made to fit into any prior period; and which are couched in a manifestly riper style than any of his other Epistles. (See on Introduction to First Timothy, see on Introduction to Second Timothy, see on Introduction to Titus and Notes). All this has been called in question by modern critics of great research and acuteness [Petavius, Lardner, De Wette, Wieseler, Davidson, and others]. But those who maintain the ancient view are of equal authority and more numerous, while the weight of argument appears to us to be decidedly on their side.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Acts 28:30-31.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Acts 28:31

No man forbidding him — Such was the victory of the word of God. While Paul was preaching at Rome, the Gospel shone with its highest lustre. Here therefore the Acts of the Apostles end; and end with great advantage. Otherwise St. Luke could easily have continued his narrative to the apostle's death.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

[[no comment]]

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
Cir, am 4069, ad 65

Preaching:

Acts 28:23 And when they had appointed him a day, there came many to him into [his] lodging; to whom he expounded and testified the kingdom of God, persuading them concerning Jesus, both out of the law of Moses, and [out of] the prophets, from morning till evening.
Acts 8:12 But when they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God, and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women.
Acts 20:25 And now, behold, I know that ye all, among whom I have gone preaching the kingdom of God, shall see my face no more.
Matthew 4:23 And Jesus went about all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all manner of sickness and all manner of disease among the people.
Mark 1:14 Now after that John was put in prison, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God,
Luke 8:1 And it came to pass afterward, that he went throughout every city and village, preaching and shewing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God: and the twelve [were] with him,

and teaching:

Acts 5:42 And daily in the temple, and in every house, they ceased not to teach and preach Jesus Christ.
Acts 23:11 And the night following the Lord stood by him, and said, Be of good cheer, Paul: for as thou hast testified of me in Jerusalem, so must thou bear witness also at Rome.

with:

Acts 4:29 And now, Lord, behold their threatenings: and grant unto thy servants, that with all boldness they may speak thy word,
Acts 4:31 And when they had prayed, the place was shaken where they were assembled together; and they were all filled with the Holy Ghost, and they spake the word of God with boldness.
Ephesians 6:19-20 And for me, that utterance may be given unto me, that I may open my mouth boldly, to make known the mystery of the gospel, ... For which I am an ambassador in bonds: that therein I may speak boldly, as I ought to speak.
Philippians 1:14 And many of the brethren in the Lord, waxing confident by my bonds, are much more bold to speak the word without fear.
Colossians 4:3-4 Withal praying also for us, that God would open unto us a door of utterance, to speak the mystery of Christ, for which I am also in bonds: ... That I may make it manifest, as I ought to speak.
2 Timothy 4:17 Notwithstanding the Lord stood with me, and strengthened me; that by me the preaching might be fully known, and [that] all the Gentiles might hear: and I was delivered out of the mouth of the lion.
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Chain-Reference Bible Search

Mt 4:23. Mk 1:14. Lk 8:1. Ac 4:29, 31; 5:42; 8:12; 20:25; 23:11; 28:23. Ep 6:19. Php 1:14. Col 4:3. 2Ti 4:17.

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