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Acts 27:40 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And casting off the anchors, they left them in the sea, at the same time loosing the bands of the rudders; and hoisting up the foresail to the wind, they made for the beach.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And when they had taken up the anchors, they committed [themselves] unto the sea, and loosed the rudder bands, and hoised up the mainsail to the wind, and made toward shore.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— And casting off the anchors, they left them in the sea while at the same time they were loosening the ropes of the rudders; and hoisting the foresail to the wind, they were heading for the beach.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And when they had taken up the anchors, they committed [themselves] to the sea, and loosed the rudder bands, and hoisted the mainsail to the wind, and made towards the shore.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— and, having cast off the anchors, they left [them] in the sea, at the same time loosening the lashings of the rudders, and hoisting the foresail to the wind, they made for the strand.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And, casting off the anchors, they let them go into the sea,—at the same time, loosening the lashings of the rudders, and, hoisting up the foresail to the wind, they made for the beach.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— and the anchors having taken up, they were committing [it] to the sea, at the same time—having loosed the bands of the rudders, and having hoisted up the mainsail to the wind—they were making for the shore,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And when they had taken up the anchors, they committed themselves to the sea, loosing withal the rudder bands. And hoisting up the mainsail to the wind, they made towards shore.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And when they had taken vp the ankers, they committed [themselues] vnto the sea, & loosed the rudder bands, and hoised vp the maine saile to the winde, and made toward shore.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And they cut the anchors from the ship, and left them in the sea, and they loosed the bands of the oars, and raised a small sail to the wind which blew, and went forward to the face of the land.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And they cut away the anchors from the ship, and left them in the sea. And they loosened the bands of the rudder, and hoisted a small sail to the breeze, and made way towards the land.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
when they had taken up y4014
[4014] Standard
περιαιρέω
periaireo
{per-ee-ahee-reh'-o}
From G4012 and G0138 (including its alternate); to remove all around, that is, unveil, cast off (anchor); figuratively to expiate.
z5631
<5631> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 889
x4104
(4104) Complement
πιστόω
pistoo
{pis-to'-o}
From G4103; to assure.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
anchors, 45
{0045} Prime
ἄγκυρα
agkura
{ang'-koo-rah}
From the same as G0043; an 'anchor' (as crooked).
they committed 1439
{1439} Prime
ἐάω
eao
{eh-ah'-o}
Of uncertain affinity; to let be, that is, permit or leave alone.
z5707
<5707> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 855
[themselves] unto 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
sea, 2281
{2281} Prime
θάλασσα
thalassa
{thal'-as-sah}
Probably prolonged from G0251; the sea (generally or specifically).
and 260
{0260} Prime
ἅμα
hama
{ham'-ah}
A primary particle; properly at the 'same' time, but freely used as a preposition or adverb denoting close association.
loosed 447
{0447} Prime
ἀνίημι
aniemi
{an-ee'-ay-mee}
From G0303 and ἵημι [[hiemi]] (to send); to let up, that is, (literally) slacken, or (figuratively) desert, desist from.
z5631
<5631> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 889
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
rudder 4079
{4079} Prime
πηδάλιον
pedalion
{pay-dal'-ee-on}
Neuter of a (presumed) derivative of πηδόν [[pedon]] (the blade of an oar; from the same as G3976); a 'pedal', that is, helm.
bands, 2202
{2202} Prime
ζευκτηρία
zeukteria
{dzook-tay-ree'-ah}
Feminine of a derivative (at the second stage) from the same as G2218; a fastening (tiller rope).
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
hoised up 1869
{1869} Prime
ἐπαίρω
epairo
{ep-ahee'-ro}
From G1909 and G0142; to raise up (literally or figuratively).
z5660
<5660> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 714
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
mainsail 736
{0736} Prime
ἀρτέμων
artemon
{ar-tem'-ohn}
From a derivative of G0737; properly something ready (or else more remotely from G0142 (compare G0740); something hung up), that is, (specifically) the topsail (rather foresail or jib) of a vessel.
to the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
wind, 4154
{4154} Prime
πνέω
pneo
{pneh'-o}
A primary word; to breathe hard, that is, breeze.
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
and made 2722
{2722} Prime
κατέχω
katecho
{kat-ekh'-o}
From G2596 and G2192; to hold down (fast), in various applications (literally or figuratively).
z5707
<5707> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 855
toward 1519
{1519} Prime
εἰς
eis
{ice}
A primary preposition; to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases.
shore. 123
{0123} Prime
αἰγιαλός
aigialos
{ahee-ghee-al-os'}
From ἀΐσσω [[aisso]] (to rush) and G0251 (in the sense of the sea); a beach (on which the waves dash).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

See commentary on Acts 27:38-40.


Acts 27:40

_ _ taken up the anchors, they committed themselves to the sea — The Margin is here evidently right, “cut the anchors (away), they left them in the sea.”

_ _ loosed the rudder bands — Ancient ships were steered by two large paddles, one on each quarter. When anchored by the stern in a gale, it would be necessary to lift them out of the water and secure them by lashings or rudder bands, and to loose these when the ship was again got under way [Smith].

_ _ hoised up the mainsail — her, “the foresail,” the best possible sail that be set in the circumstances. How necessary must the crew have been to execute all these movements, and how obvious the foresight which made their stay indispensable to the safety of all on board (see on Acts 27:31)!

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Acts 27:21-44.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Acts 27:40

Loosing the rudder bands — Their ships had frequently two rudders, one on each side. were fastened while they let the ship drive; but were now loosened, when they had need of them to steer her into the creek.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

[[no comment]]

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
taken up:
etc. or, cut the anchors, they left them in the sea, etc.
Acts 27:29-30 Then fearing lest we should have fallen upon rocks, they cast four anchors out of the stern, and wished for the day. ... And as the shipmen were about to flee out of the ship, when they had let down the boat into the sea, under colour as though they would have cast anchors out of the foreship,

the rudder bands:
Or, "the bands of the rudders;" for large vessels in ancient times had two or more rudders, which were fastened to the ship by means of bands, or chains, by which they were hoisted out of the water when incapable of being used. These bands being loosed, the rudders would fall into their proper places, and serve to steer the vessel into the creek, which they had in view, and hoisted.
Isaiah 33:23 Thy tacklings are loosed; they could not well strengthen their mast, they could not spread the sail: then is the prey of a great spoil divided; the lame take the prey.
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Is 33:23. Ac 27:29.

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