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Acts 24:2 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And when he was called, Tertullus began to accuse him, saying, Seeing that by thee we enjoy much peace, and that by the providence evils are corrected for this nation,
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And when he was called forth, Tertullus began to accuse [him], saying, Seeing that by thee we enjoy great quietness, and that very worthy deeds are done unto this nation by thy providence,
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— After [Paul] had been summoned, Tertullus began to accuse him, saying [to the governor], “Since we have through you attained much peace, and since by your providence reforms are being carried out for this nation,
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And when he was called forth, Tertullus began to accuse [him], saying, Seeing that by thee we enjoy great quietness, and that very worthy deeds are done to this nation by thy providence,
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And he having been called, Tertullus began to accuse, saying, Seeing we enjoy great peace through thee, and that excellent measures are executed for this nation by thy forethought,
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And, when he was called, Tertullus began to make accusation, saying—Seeing that, great peace, we are obtaining through thee, and that, reforms, are being brought about for this nation through thy forethought,
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— and he having been called, Tertullus began to accuse [him], saying, 'Much peace enjoying through thee, and worthy deeds being done to this nation through thy forethought,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And Paul being called for, Tertullus began to accuse him, saying: Whereas, through thee we live in much peace and many things are rectified by thy providence,
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And when he was called foorth, Tertullus began to accuse him, saying, Seeing that by thee we enioy great quietnesse, and that very worthy deeds are done vnto this natio by thy prouidence:
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— And being called, Tartelos came forth to accuse him, and said,
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And when he had been called, Tertullus began to accuse him, and to say:

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
when he 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
was called forth, 2564
{2564} Prime
καλέω
kaleo
{kal-eh'-o}
Akin to the base of G2753; to 'call' (properly aloud, but used in a variety of applications, directly or otherwise).
z5685
<5685> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 215
Tertullus 5061
{5061} Prime
Τέρτυλλος
Tertullos
{ter'-tool-los}
Of uncertain derivation; Tertullus, a Roman.
began 756
{0756} Prime
ἄρχομαι
archomai
{ar'-khom-ahee}
Middle voice of G0757 (through the implication of precedence); to commence (in order of time).
z5662
<5662> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Middle Deponent (See G5788)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 352
to accuse 2723
{2723} Prime
κατηγορέω
kategoreo
{kat-ay-gor-eh'-o}
From G2725; to be a plaintiff, that is, to charge with some offence.
z5721
<5721> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 647
[him], saying, 3004
{3004} Prime
λέγω
lego
{leg'-o}
A primary verb; properly to 'lay' forth, that is, (figuratively) relate (in words [usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas G2036 and G5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while G4483 is properly to break silence merely, and G2980 means an extended or random harangue]); by implication to mean.
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
Seeing that by 1223
{1223} Prime
διά
dia
{dee-ah'}
A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through (in very wide applications, local, causal or occasional). In composition it retains the same general import.
thee 4675
{4675} Prime
σοῦ
sou
{soo}
Genitive case of G4771; of thee, thy.
we enjoy 5177
{5177} Prime
τυγχάνω
tugchano
{toong-khan'-o}
Probably for an obsolete τύχω [[tucho]] (for which the middle voice of another alternate τεύχω [[teucho]] [to make ready or bring to pass] is used in certain tenses; akin to the base of G5088 through the idea of effecting; properly to affect; or (specifically) to hit or light upon (as a mark to be reached), that is, (transitively) to attain or secure an object or end, or (intransitively) to happen (as if meeting with); but in the latter application only impersonally (with G1487), that is, perchance; or (present participle) as adjective usual (as if commonly met with, with G3756, extraordinary), neuter (as adverb) perhaps; or (with another verb) as adverb by accident (as it were).
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
great 4183
{4183} Prime
πολύς
polus
{pol-oos'}
Including the forms from the alternate 'pollos'; (singular) much (in any respect) or (plural) many; neuter (singular) as adverb largely; neuter (plural) as adverb or noun often, mostly, largely.
quietness, 1515
{1515} Prime
εἰρήνη
eirene
{i-ray'-nay}
Probably from a primary verb εἴρω [[eiro]] (to join); peace (literally or figuratively); by implication prosperity.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
that very worthy deeds 2735
{2735} Prime
κατόρθωμα
katorthoma
{kat-or'-tho-mah}
From a compound of G2596 and a derivative of G3717 (compare G1357); something made fully upright, that is, (figuratively) rectification (specifically good public administration).
are done 1096
{1096} Prime
γίνομαι
ginomai
{ghin'-om-ahee}
A prolonged and middle form of a primary verb; to cause to be ('gen' -erate), that is, (reflexively) to become (come into being), used with great latitude (literally, figuratively, intensively, etc.).
z5740
<5740> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 544
unto this 5129
{5129} Prime
τούτῳ
touto
{too'-to}
Dative singular masculine or neuter of G3778; to (in, with or by) this (person or thing).
nation 1484
{1484} Prime
ἔθνος
ethnos
{eth'-nos}
Probably from G1486; a race (as of the same habit), that is, a tribe; specifically a foreign (non-Jewish) one (usually by implication pagan).
by 1223
{1223} Prime
διά
dia
{dee-ah'}
A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through (in very wide applications, local, causal or occasional). In composition it retains the same general import.
thy 4674
{4674} Prime
σός
sos
{sos}
From G4771; thine.
providence, 4307
{4307} Prime
πρόνοια
pronoia
{pron'-oy-ah}
From G4306; forethought, that is, provident care or supply.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Acts 24:2-4

_ _ Seeing that by thee we enjoy great quietness, etc. — In this fulsome flattery there was a semblance of truth: nothing more. Felix acted with a degree of vigor and success in suppressing lawless violence [Josephus, Antiquities, 20.8.4; confirmed by Tacitus, Annals, 12.54].

_ _ by thy providence — a phrase applied to the administration of the emperors.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Acts 24:1-9.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Acts 24:2

Tertullus began — A speech how different from St. Paul's; which is true, modest, solid, and without paint. Felix was a man of the most infamous character, and a plague to all the provinces over which he presided.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Acts 24:2

And when he was called forth, Tertullus began to accuse [him], saying, Seeing that (a) by thee we enjoy great quietness, and that very (b) worthy deeds are done unto this nation by thy providence,

(a) Felix ruled that province with great cruelty and covetousness, and yet Josephus records that he did many worthy things, such as taking Eleazar the captain of certain cutthroats, and put that deceiving wretch the Egyptian to flight, who caused great troubles in Judea.

(b) He uses a word which the Stoics defined as a perfect duty and perfect behaviour.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
Seeing:
Felix, bad as he was, had certainly rendered some services to Judaea. He had entirely subdued a very formidable banditti which had infested the country, and sent their captain, Eliezar, to Rome; had suppressed the sedition raised by the Egyptian impostor (
Acts 21:38 Art not thou that Egyptian, which before these days madest an uproar, and leddest out into the wilderness four thousand men that were murderers?
); and had quelled a very afflictive disturbance which took place between the Syrians and Jews of Cesarea. But, though Tertullus might truly say, "by thee we enjoy great quietness," yet it is evident that he was guilty of the grossest flattery, as we have seen both from his own historians and Josephus, that he was both a bad man and a bad governor.
Acts 24:26-27 He hoped also that money should have been given him of Paul, that he might loose him: wherefore he sent for him the oftener, and communed with him. ... But after two years Porcius Festus came into Felix' room: and Felix, willing to shew the Jews a pleasure, left Paul bound.
Psalms 10:3 For the wicked boasteth of his heart's desire, and blesseth the covetous, [whom] the LORD abhorreth.
Psalms 12:2-3 They speak vanity every one with his neighbour: [with] flattering lips [and] with a double heart do they speak. ... The LORD shall cut off all flattering lips, [and] the tongue that speaketh proud things:
Proverbs 26:28 A lying tongue hateth [those that are] afflicted by it; and a flattering mouth worketh ruin.
Proverbs 29:5 A man that flattereth his neighbour spreadeth a net for his feet.
Jude 1:16 These are murmurers, complainers, walking after their own lusts; and their mouth speaketh great swelling [words], having men's persons in admiration because of advantage.
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Ps 10:3; 12:2. Pv 26:28; 29:5. Ac 21:38; 24:26. Jde 1:16.

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