Parallel Bible VersionsGreek Bible Study Tools

Acts 17:18 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And certain also of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers encountered him. And some said, What would this babbler say? others, He seemeth to be a setter forth of strange gods: because he preached Jesus and the resurrection.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Then certain philosophers of the Epicureans, and of the Stoicks, encountered him. And some said, What will this babbler say? other some, He seemeth to be a setter forth of strange gods: because he preached unto them Jesus, and the resurrection.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— And also some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers were conversing with him. Some were saying, “What would this idle babbler wish to say?” Others, “He seems to be a proclaimer of strange deities,”—because he was preaching Jesus and the resurrection.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Then certain philosophers of the Epicureans, and of the Stoics, encountered him. And some said, What will this babbler say? some others, He seemeth to be a setter-forth of strange gods: because he preached to them Jesus, and the resurrection.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— But some also of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers attacked him. And some said, What would this chatterer say? and some, He seems to be an announcer of foreign demons, because he announced the glad tidings of Jesus and the resurrection [to them].
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— But, certain both of the Epicurean and of the Stoic philosophers, were encountering him; and some were saying—What might this picker-up-of-scraps wish to be saying? And, others—Of foreign demons, he seemeth to be a declarer: because, of Jesus and the Resurrection, he was announcing the joyful tidings.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And certain of the Epicurean and of the Stoic philosophers, were meeting together to see him, and some were saying, 'What would this seed picker wish to say?' and others, 'Of strange demons he doth seem to be an announcer;' because Jesus and the rising again he did proclaim to them as good news,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And certain philosophers of the Epicureans and of the Stoics disputed with him. And some said: What is it that this word sower would say? But others: He seemeth to be a setter forth of new gods. Because he preached to them Jesus and the resurrection.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Then certaine Philosophers of the Epicureans, and of the Stoikes, encountred him: and some said, What will this babbler say? Othersome, He seemeth to be a setter foorth of strange gods: because hee preached vnto them Iesus, and the resurrection.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— and the philosophers also who were of the doctrine of Epikuros, and others who were called Estoiku, disputed with him. And some of them said, What willeth this accumulator of words? And others said, He preaches foreign gods; because Jeshu and his resurrection he preached unto them.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And also philosophers of the sect of Epicureans, and others who were called Stoics, disputed with him. And one and another of them said: What doth this word-monger mean? Others said: He announceth foreign deities; because he preached to them Jesus and his resurrection.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Then 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
certain 5100
{5100} Prime
τὶς
tis
{tis}
An enclitic indefinite pronoun; some or any person or object.
philosophers 5386
{5386} Prime
φιλόσοφος
philosophos
{fil-os'-of-os}
From G5384 and G4680; fond of wise things, that is, a 'philosopher'.
of the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
Epicureans, 1946
{1946} Prime
Ἐπικούρειος
Epikoureios
{ep-ee-koo'-ri-os}
From Ἐπίκουρος [[Epikouros]] (compare G1947; a noted philosopher); an Epicurean or follower of Epicurus.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
of the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
Stoicks, y4770
[4770] Standard
Στωϊκός
Stoikos
{sto-ik-os'}
From G4745; a 'stoic' (as occupying a particular porch in Athens), that is, adherent of a certain philosophy.
x4470
(4470) Complement
ῥάκος
rhakos
{hrak'-os}
From G4486; a 'rag', that is, piece of cloth.
encountered 4820
{4820} Prime
συμβάλλω
sumballo
{soom-bal'-lo}
From G4862 and G0906; to combine, that is, (in speaking) to converse, consult, dispute, (mentally) to consider, (by implication) to aid, (personally) to join, attack.
z5707
<5707> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 855
him. 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
And 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
some 5100
{5100} Prime
τὶς
tis
{tis}
An enclitic indefinite pronoun; some or any person or object.
said, 3004
{3004} Prime
λέγω
lego
{leg'-o}
A primary verb; properly to 'lay' forth, that is, (figuratively) relate (in words [usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas G2036 and G5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while G4483 is properly to break silence merely, and G2980 means an extended or random harangue]); by implication to mean.
z5707
<5707> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 855
What 5101
{5101} Prime
τίς
tis
{tis}
Probably emphatic of G5100; an interrogitive pronoun, who, which or what (in direct or indirect questions).
will 302
{0302} Prime
ἄν
an
{an}
A primary particle, denoting a supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty.
2309
{2309} Prime
θέλω
thelo
{thel'-o}
In certain tenses θελέω [[theleo]], {thel-eh'-o}; and ἐθέλέω [[etheleo]], {eth-el-eh'-o}, which are otherwise obsolete; apparently strengthened from the alternate form of G0138; to determine (as an active voice option from subjective impulse; whereas G1014 properly denotes rather a passive voice acquiescence in objective considerations), that is, choose or prefer (literally or figuratively); by implication to wish, that is, be inclined to (sometimes adverbially gladly); impersonally for the future tense, to be about to; by Hebraism to delight in.
z5722
<5722> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Optative (See G5793)
Count - 8
this 3778
{3778} Prime
οὗτος
houtos
{hoo'-tos}
Including the nominative masculine plural (second form), nominative feminine signular (third form), and the nominate feminine plural, (fourth form). From the article G3588 and G0846; the he (she or it), that is, this or that (often with the article repeated).
babbler 4691
{4691} Prime
σπερμολόγος
spermologos
{sper-mol-og'-os}
From G4690 and G3004; a seed picker (as the crow), that is, (figuratively) a sponger, loafer (specifically a gossip or trifler in talk).
say? 3004
{3004} Prime
λέγω
lego
{leg'-o}
A primary verb; properly to 'lay' forth, that is, (figuratively) relate (in words [usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas G2036 and G5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while G4483 is properly to break silence merely, and G2980 means an extended or random harangue]); by implication to mean.
1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
z5721
<5721> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 647
other x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
some, He seemeth 1380
{1380} Prime
δοκέω
dokeo
{dok-eh'-o}
A prolonged form of a primary verb δόκω [[doko]], {dok'-o} (used only as an alternate in certain tenses; compare the base of G1166); of the same meaning; to think; by implication to seem (truthfully or uncertainly).
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
to be 1511
{1511} Prime
εἶναι
einai
{i'-nahee}
Present infinitive from G1510; to exist.
z5750
<5750> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 135
a setter forth 2604
{2604} Prime
καταγγελεύς
kataggeleus
{kat-ang-gel-yooce'}
From G2605; a proclaimer.
of strange 3581
{3581} Prime
ξένος
xenos
{xen'-os}
Apparently a primary word; foreign (literally alien, or figuratively novel); by implication a guest or (vice-versa) entertainer.
gods: 1140
{1140} Prime
δαιμόνιον
daimonion
{dahee-mon'-ee-on}
Neuter of a derivative of G1142; a daemonic being; by extension a deity.
because 3754
{3754} Prime
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
he preached 2097
{2097} Prime
εὐαγγελίζω
euaggelizo
{yoo-ang-ghel-id'-zo}
From G2095 and G0032; to announce good news ('evangelize') especially the gospel.
z5710
<5710> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Middle (See G5785)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 34
unto them 846
{0846} Prime
αὐτός
autos
{ow-tos'}
From the particle αὖ [[au]] (perhaps akin to the base of G0109 through the idea of a baffling wind; backward); the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the compound of G1438) of the third person, and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons.
Jesus, 2424
{2424} Prime
Ἰησοῦς
Iesous
{ee-ay-sooce'}
Of Hebrew origin [H3091]; Jesus (that is, Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
resurrection. 386
{0386} Prime
ἀνάστασις
anastasis
{an-as'-tas-is}
From G0450; a standing up again, that is, (literally) a resurrection from death (individual, general or by implication (its author)), or (figuratively) a (moral) recovery (of spiritual truth).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Acts 17:18-21

_ _ certain ... of the Epicureans — a well-known school of atheistic materialists, who taught that pleasure was the chief end of human existence; a principle which the more rational interpreted in a refined sense, while the sensual explained it in its coarser meaning.

_ _ and of the Stoics — a celebrated school of severe and lofty pantheists, whose principle was that the universe was under the law of an iron necessity, the spirit of which was what is called the Deity: and that a passionless conformity of the human will to this law, unmoved by all external circumstances and changes, is the perfection of virtue. While therefore the Stoical was in itself superior to the Epicurean system, both were alike hostile to the Gospel. “The two enemies it has ever had to contend with are the two ruling principles of the Epicureans and Stoics — Pleasure and Pride” [Howson].

_ _ What will this babbler say? — The word, which means “a picker-up of seeds,” bird-like, is applied to a gatherer and retailer of scraps of knowledge, a prater; a general term of contempt for any pretended teacher.

_ _ a setter forth of strange gods — “demons,” but in the Greek (not Jewish) sense of “objects of worship.

_ _ because he preached Jesus and the resurrection — Not as if they thought he made these to be two divinities: the strange gods were Jehovah and the Risen Savior, ordained to judge the world.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Acts 17:16-21.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Acts 17:18

Some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosopher — The Epicureans entirely denied a providence, and held the world to be the effect of mere chance; asserting sensual pleasure to be man's chief good, and that the soul and body died together. The Stoics held, that matter was eternal; that all things were governed by irresistible fate; that virtue was its own sufficient reward, and vice its own sufficient punishment. It is easy to see, how happily the apostle levels his discourse at some of the most important errors of each, while, without expressly attacking either, he gives a plain summary of his own religious principles. What would this babbler say? — Such is the language of natural reason, full of, and satisfied with itself. Yet even here St. Paul had some fruit; though nowhere less than at Athens. And no wonder, since this city was a seminary of philosophers, who have ever been the pest of true religion. He seemeth to be a proclaimer — This he returns upon them at Acts 17:23; of strange gods — Such as are not known even at Athens. Because he preached to them Jesus and the resurrection — A god and a goddess. And as stupid as this mistake was, it is the less to be wondered at, since the Athenians might as well count the resurrection a deity, as shame, famine, and many others.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Acts 17:18

(10) Then certain philosophers of the Epicureans, and of the Stoicks, encountered him. And some said, What will this (i) babbler say? other some, He seemeth to be a setter forth of strange gods: because he preached unto them Jesus, and the resurrection.

(10) Two special sects of the philosophers set themselves against Christ: the Epicures, who mock and scoff at religion: and the Stoics, who decide religious matters according to their own thinking.

(i) Literally, "seed gatherer": a borrowed kind of speech taken from birds which spoil corn, and is applied to those who without any skill blurt out the knowledge which they have gotten by hearing this man and that man.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
philosophers:

Romans 1:22 Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,
1 Corinthians 1:20-21 Where [is] the wise? where [is] the scribe? where [is] the disputer of this world? hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? ... For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe.
Colossians 2:8 Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ.

encountered:

Acts 6:9 Then there arose certain of the synagogue, which is called [the synagogue] of the Libertines, and Cyrenians, and Alexandrians, and of them of Cilicia and of Asia, disputing with Stephen.
Mark 9:14 And when he came to [his] disciples, he saw a great multitude about them, and the scribes questioning with them.
Luke 11:53 And as he said these things unto them, the scribes and the Pharisees began to urge [him] vehemently, and to provoke him to speak of many things:

babbler:
or, base fellow,
Proverbs 23:9 Speak not in the ears of a fool: for he will despise the wisdom of thy words.
Proverbs 26:12 Seest thou a man wise in his own conceit? [there is] more hope of a fool than of him.
1 Corinthians 3:18 Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you seemeth to be wise in this world, let him become a fool, that he may be wise.

Jesus:

Acts 17:31 Because he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness by [that] man whom he hath ordained; [whereof] he hath given assurance unto all [men], in that he hath raised him from the dead.
Acts 26:23 That Christ should suffer, [and] that he should be the first that should rise from the dead, and should shew light unto the people, and to the Gentiles.
Romans 14:9-10 For to this end Christ both died, and rose, and revived, that he might be Lord both of the dead and living. ... But why dost thou judge thy brother? or why dost thou set at nought thy brother? for we shall all stand before the judgment seat of Christ.
1 Corinthians 15:3-4 For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; ... And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:
Random Bible VersesNew Quotes



Chain-Reference Bible Search

Pv 23:9; 26:12. Mk 9:14. Lk 11:53. Ac 6:9; 17:31; 26:23. Ro 1:22; 14:9. 1Co 1:20; 3:18; 15:3. Col 2:8.

Newest Chat Bible Comment
Comment HereComplete Biblical ResearchComplete Chat Bible Commentary
Please post your comment on Acts 17:18.
Name:

WWW Chat Bible Commentary

User-Posted Comments on Acts 17:18


Recent Chat Bible Comments