Parallel Bible VersionsGreek Bible Study Tools

Acts 13:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Now there were at Antioch, in the church that was [there], prophets and teachers, Barnabas, and Symeon that was called Niger, and Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen the foster-brother of Herod the tetrarch, and Saul.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Now there were in the church that was at Antioch certain prophets and teachers; as Barnabas, and Simeon that was called Niger, and Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen, which had been brought up with Herod the tetrarch, and Saul.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Now there were at Antioch, in the church that was [there], prophets and teachers: Barnabas, and Simeon who was called Niger, and Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen who had been brought up with Herod the tetrarch, and Saul.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Now there were in the church that was at Antioch certain prophets and teachers; as Barnabas, and Simeon that was called Niger, and Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen, who had been brought up with Herod the tetrarch, and Saul.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Now there were in Antioch, in the assembly which was [there], prophets and teachers: Barnabas, and Simeon who was called Niger, and Lucius the Cyrenian, and Manaen, foster-brother of Herod the tetrarch, and Saul.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Now there were in Antioch, distributed through the existing assembly,—prophets and teachers: both Barnabas and Symeon who was called Niger, and Lucius the Cyrenian, Manaen also, Herod the tetrarch's foster-brother, and Saul.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And there were certain in Antioch, in the assembly there, prophets and teachers; both Barnabas, and Simeon who is called Niger, and Lucius the Cyrenian, Manaen also—Herod the tetrarch's foster-brother—and Saul;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Now there were in the church which was at Antioch prophets and doctors, among whom was Barnabas and Simon who was called Niger, and Lucius of Cyrene and Manahen who was the foster brother of Herod the tetrarch, and Saul.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Nowe there were in the Church that was at Antioch, certaine Prophets and teachers: as Barnabas, and Simeon that was called Niger, and Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen, which had bene brought vp with Herod the Tetrarch, and Saul.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— But there were in the church of Antiokia prophets and teachers, Bar Naba and Shemun who was called Niger, and Lukios who was from the city of Kyrene, and Manael, a fosterbrother of Herodes Tetrarka, and Shaol.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— Now there were in the church at Antioch, [several] prophets and teachers; Barnabas, and Simon called Niger, and Lucius who was from the city Cyrene, and Menaen, a son of the guardians of Herod the Tetrarch, and Saul.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Now 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
there were 2258
{2258} Prime
ἦν
en
{ane}
Imperfect of G1510; I (thou, etc.) was (wast or were).
z5713
<5713> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 532
in 2596
{2596} Prime
κατά
kata
{kat-ah'}
A primary particle; (preposition) down (in place or time), in varied relations (according to the case [genitive, dative or accusative] with which it is joined).
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
church 1577
{1577} Prime
ἐκκλησία
ekklesia
{ek-klay-see'-ah}
From a compound of G1537 and a derivative of G2564; a calling out, that is, (concretely) a popular meeting, especially a religious congregation (Jewish synagogue, or Christian community of members on earth or saints in heaven or both).
that was 5607
{5607} Prime
ὤν
on
{oan}
The feminine, the neuter and the present participle of G1510; being.
z5752
<5752> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 186
at 1722
{1722} Prime
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
Antioch 490
{0490} Prime
Ἀντιόχεια
Antiocheia
{an-tee-okh'-i-ah}
From Ἀντίοχος [[Antiochus]] (a Syrian king); Antiochia, a place in Syria.
certain 5100
{5100} Prime
τὶς
tis
{tis}
An enclitic indefinite pronoun; some or any person or object.
prophets 4396
{4396} Prime
προφήτης
prophetes
{prof-ay'-tace}
From a compound of G4253 and G5346; a foreteller ('prophet'); by analogy an inspired speaker; by extension a poet.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
teachers; 1320
{1320} Prime
διδάσκαλος
didaskalos
{did-as'-kal-os}
From G1321; an instructor (generally or specifically).
as 5037
{5037} Prime
τέ
te
{teh}
A primary particle (enclitic) of connection or addition; both or also (properly as a correlation of G2532).
x3739
(3739) Complement
ὅς
hos
{hos}
Probably a primary word (or perhaps a form of the article G3588); the relative (sometimes demonstrative) pronoun, who, which, what, that.
Barnabas, 921
{0921} Prime
Βαρναβᾶς
Barnabas
{bar-nab'-as}
Of Chaldee origin [H1247] and [H5029]; son of Nabas (that is, prophecy); Barnabas, an Israelite.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
Simeon 4826
{4826} Prime
Συμεών
Sumeon
{soom-eh-one'}
From the same as G4613; Symeon (that is, Shimon), the name of five Israelites.
that was called 2564
{2564} Prime
καλέω
kaleo
{kal-eh'-o}
Akin to the base of G2753; to 'call' (properly aloud, but used in a variety of applications, directly or otherwise).
z5746
<5746> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 360
Niger, 3526
{3526} Prime
Νίγερ
Niger
{neeg'-er}
Of Latin origin; black; Niger, a Christian.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
Lucius 3066
{3066} Prime
Λούκιος
Loukios
{loo'-kee-os}
Of Latin origin; illuminative; Lucius, a Christian.
of Cyrene, 2956
{2956} Prime
Κυρηναῖος
Kurenaios
{koo-ray-nah'-yos}
From G2957; a Cyrenaean, that is, inhabitant of Cyrene.
and 5037
{5037} Prime
τέ
te
{teh}
A primary particle (enclitic) of connection or addition; both or also (properly as a correlation of G2532).
Manaen, 3127
{3127} Prime
Μαναήν
Manaen
{man-ah-ane'}
Of uncertain origin; Manaen, a Christian.
which had been brought up y4939
[4939] Standard
σύντροφος
suntrophos
{soon'-trof-os}
From G4862 and G5162 (in a passive sense); a fellow nursling, that is, comrade.
with x4939
(4939) Complement
σύντροφος
suntrophos
{soon'-trof-os}
From G4862 and G5162 (in a passive sense); a fellow nursling, that is, comrade.
Herod 2264
{2264} Prime
Ἡρῴδης
Herodes
{hay-ro'-dace}
Compound of ἥρως [[heros]] (a 'hero') and G1491; heroic; Herodes, the name of four Jewish kings.
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
tetrarch, 5076
{5076} Prime
τετράρχης
tetrarches
{tet-rar'-khace}
From G5064 and G0757; the ruler of a fourth part of a country ('tetrarch').
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
Saul. 4569
{4569} Prime
Σαῦλος
Saulos
{sow'-los}
Of Hebrew origin, the same as G4549; Saulus (that is, Shaul), the Jewish name of Paul.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Acts 13:1

_ _ Acts 13:1-14:28. Paul’s First Missionary Journey: in company with Barnabas.

_ _ Acts 13:1-3. Barnabas and Saul, divinely called to labor among the Gentiles, are set apart and sent forth by the church at Antioch.

_ _ The first seven chapters of this book might be entitled, The Church among the Jews; the next five (chapters eight through twelve), The Church in Transition from Jews to Gentiles; and the last sixteen (chapters thirteen through twenty-eight), The Church among the Gentiles [Baumgarten]. “Though Christianity had already spread beyond the limits of Palestine, still the Church continued a stranger to formal missionary effort. Casual occurrences, particularly the persecution at Jerusalem (Acts 8:2), had hitherto brought about the diffusion of the Gospel. It was from Antioch that teachers were first sent forth with the definite purpose of spreading Christianity, and organizing churches, with regular institutions (Acts 14:23)” [Olshausen].

_ _ there were ... certain prophets — (See on Acts 11:27).

_ _ and teachers; as Barnabas, etc. — implying that there were others there, besides; but, according to what appears the true reading, the meaning is simply that those here mentioned were in the Church at Antioch as prophets and teachers.

_ _ Simeon ... Niger — of whom nothing is known.

_ _ Lucius of Cyrene — (Acts 2:20). He is mentioned, in Romans 16:21, as one of Paul’s kinsmen.

_ _ Manaen — or Menahem, the name of one of the kings of Israel (2 Kings 15:14).

_ _ which had been brought up with — or, the foster brother of.

_ _ Herod the tetrarch — that is, Antipas, who was himself “brought up with a certain private person at Rome” [Josephus, Antiquities, 17.1, 3]. How differently did these two foster brothers turn out — the one, abandoned to a licentious life and stained with the blood of the most distinguished of God’s prophets, though not without his fits of reformation and seasons of remorse; the other, a devoted disciple of the Lord Jesus and prophet of the Church at Antioch! But this is only what may be seen in every age: “Even so, Father, for so it seemeth good in Thy sight.’ If the courtier, whose son, at the point of death, was healed by our Lord (John 4:46) was of Herod’s establishment, while Susanna’s husband was his steward (Luke 8:3), his foster brother’s becoming a Christian and a prophet is something remarkable.

_ _ and Saul — last of all, but soon to become first. Henceforward this book is almost exclusively occupied with him; and his impress on the New Testament, on Christendom, and on the world is paramount.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Acts 13:1-3

_ _ We have here a divine warrant and commission to Barnabas and Saul to go and preach the gospel among the Gentiles, and their ordination to that service by the imposition of hands, with fasting and prayer.

_ _ I. Here is an account of the present state of the church at Antioch, which was planted, Acts 11:20.

_ _ 1. How well furnished it was with good ministers; there were there certain prophets and teachers (Acts 13:1), men that were eminent for gifts, graces, and usefulness. Christ, when he ascended on high, gave some prophets and some teachers (Ephesians 4:11); these were both. Agabus seems to have been a prophet and not a teacher, and many were teachers who were not prophets; but those here mentioned were at times divinely inspired, and had instructions immediately from heaven upon special occasions, which gave them the title of prophets; and withal they were stated teachers of the church in their religious assemblies, expounded the scriptures, and opened the doctrine of Christ with suitable applications. These were the prophets, and scribes, or teachers, which Christ promised to send (Matthew 23:34), such as were every way qualified for the service of the Christian church. Antioch was a great city, and the Christians there were many, so that they could not all meet in one place; it was therefore requisite they should have many teachers, to preside in their respective assemblies, and to deliver God's mind to them. Barnabas is first named, probably because he was the eldest, and Saul last, probably because he was the youngest; but afterwards the last became first, and Saul more eminent in the church. Three others are mentioned. (1.) Simeon, or Simon, who for distinction-sake was called Niger, Simon the Black, from the color of his hair; like him that with us was surnamed the Black Prince. (2.) Lucius of Cyrene, who some think (and Dr. Lightfoot inclines to it) was the same with this Luke that wrote the Acts, originally a Cyrenian, and educated in the Cyrenian college or synagogue at Jerusalem, and there first receiving the gospel. (3.) Manaen, a person of some quality, as it should seem, for he was brought up with Herod the tetrarch, either nursed of the same milk, or bred at the same school, or pupil to the same tutor, or rather one that was his constant colleague and companion — that in every part of his education was his comrade and intimate, which gave him a fair prospect of preferment at court, and yet for Christ's sake he quitted all the hopes of it; like Moses, who, when he had come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter. Had he joined in with Herod, with whom he was brought up, he might have had Blastus's place, and have been his chamberlain; but it is better to be fellow-sufferer with a saint than fellow-persecutor with a tetrarch.

_ _ 2. How well employed they were (Acts 13:2): They ministered to the Lord, and fasted. Observe, (1.) Diligent faithful teachers do truly minister unto the Lord. Those that instruct Christians serve Christ; they really do him honour, and carry on the interest of his kingdom. Those that minister to the church in praying and preaching (both which are included here), minister unto the Lord, for they are the church's servants for Christ's sake; to him they must have an eye in their ministrations, and from him they shall have their recompence. (2.) Ministering to the Lord, in one way or other, ought to be the stated business of churches and their teachers; to this work time ought to be set apart, nay, it is set apart, and in this work we ought to spend some part of every day. What have we to do as Christians and ministers but to serve the Lord Christ? Colossians 3:24; Romans 14:18. (3.) Religious fasting is of use in our ministering to the Lord, both as a sign of our humiliation and a means of our mortification. Though it was not so much practised by the disciples of Christ, while the bridegroom was with them, as it was by the disciples of John and of the Pharisees; yet, after the bridegroom was taken away, they abounded in it, as those that had well learned to deny themselves and to endure hardness.

_ _ II. The orders given by the Holy Ghost for the setting apart of Barnabas and Saul, while they were engaged in public exercises, the ministers of the several congregations in the city joining in one solemn fast or day of prayer: The Holy Ghost said, either by a voice from heaven, or by a strong impulse on the minds of those of them that were prophets, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them. He does not specify the work, but refers to a former call of which they themselves knew the meaning, whether others did or no: as for Saul, he was particularly told that he must bear Christ's name to the Gentiles (Acts 9:15), that he must be sent to the Gentiles (Acts 22:21); the matter was settled between them at Jerusalem before this, that as Peter, James, and John laid out themselves among those of the circumcision, so Paul and Barnabas should go to the heathen, Galatians 2:7-9. Barnabas, it is likely, knew himself designed for this service as well as Paul. Yet they would not thrust themselves into this harvest, though it appeared plenteous, till they received their orders from the Lord of the harvest: Thrust in thy sickle for the harvest is ripe, Revelation 14:15. The orders were, Separate me Barnabas and Saul. Observe here, 1. Christ by his Spirit has the nomination of his ministers; for it is by the Spirit of Christ that they are qualified in some measure for his services, inclined to it, and taken off from other cares inconsistent with it. There are some whom the Holy Ghost has separated for the service of Christ, has distinguished from others as men that are offered and that willingly offer themselves to the temple service; and concerning them directions are given to those who are competent judges of the sufficiency of the abilities and the sincerity of the inclination: Separate them. 2. Christ's ministers are separated to him and to the Holy Ghost: Separate them to me; they are to be employed in Christ's work and under the Spirit's guidance, to the glory of God the Father. 3. All that are separated to Christ as his ministers are separated to work; Christ keeps no servants to be idle. If any man desires the office of a bishop, he desires a good work; that is what he is separated to, to labour in the word and doctrine. They are separated to take pains, not to take state. 4. The work of Christ's ministers, to which they are to be separated, is work that is already settled, and that which all Christ's ministers hitherto have been called to, and which they themselves have first been, by an external call, directed to and have chosen.

_ _ III. Their ordination, pursuant to these orders: not to the ministry in general (Barnabas and Saul had both of them been ministers long before this), but to a particular service in the ministry, which had something peculiar in it, and which required a fresh commission, which commission God saw fit at this time to transmit by the hands of these prophets and teachers, for the giving of this direction to the church, that teachers should ordain teachers (for prophets we are not now any longer to expect), and that those who have the dispensing of the oracles of Christ committed to them should, for the benefit of posterity, commit the same to faithful men, who shall be able also to teach others, 2 Timothy 2:2. So here, Simeon, and Lucius, and Manaen, faithful teachers at this time in the church of Antioch, when they had fasted and prayed, laid their hands on Barnabas and Saul, and sent them away (Acts 13:3), according to the directions received. Observe, 1. They prayed for them. When good men are going forth about good work, they ought to be solemnly and particularly prayed for, especially by their brethren that are their fellow-labourers and fellow-soldiers. 2. They joined fasting with their prayers, as they did in their other ministrations, Acts 13:3. Christ has taught us this by his abstaining from sleep (a night-fast, if I may so call it) the night before he sent forth his apostles, that he might spend it in prayer. 3. They laid their hands on them. Hereby, (1.) They gave them their manumission, dismission, or discharge from the present service they were engaged in, in the church of Antioch, acknowledging that they went off not only fairly and with consent, but honourably and with a good report. (2.) They implored a blessing upon them in their present undertaking, begged that God would be with them, and give them success; and, in order to this, that they might be filled with the Holy Ghost in their work. This very thing is explained Acts 14:26, where it is said, concerning Paul and Barnabas, that from Antioch they had been recommended to the grace of God for the work which they fulfilled. As it was an instance of the humility of Barnabas and Saul that they submitted to the imposition of the hands of those that were their equals, or rather their inferiors; so it was of the good disposition of the other teachers that they did not envy Barnabas and Saul the honour to which they were preferred, but cheerfully committed it to them, with hearty prayers for them; and they sent them away with all expedition, out of a concern for those countries where they were to break up fallow ground.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Acts 13:1

Manaen, who had been brought up with Herod — His foster brother, now freed from the temptations of a court.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Acts 13:1

Now (1) there were in the church that was at Antioch certain prophets and teachers; as Barnabas, and Simeon that was called Niger, and Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen, which had been brought up with (a) Herod the tetrarch, and Saul.

(1) Paul with Barnabas is again the second time appointed apostle of the Gentiles, not of man, neither by man, but by an extraordinary commandment of the Holy Spirit.

(a) This was the same Antipas who put John the Baptist to death.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
Cir, am 4049, ad 45

in the:

Acts 11:22-24 Then tidings of these things came unto the ears of the church which was in Jerusalem: and they sent forth Barnabas, that he should go as far as Antioch. ... For he was a good man, and full of the Holy Ghost and of faith: and much people was added unto the Lord.
Acts 14:26-27 And thence sailed to Antioch, from whence they had been recommended to the grace of God for the work which they fulfilled. ... And when they were come, and had gathered the church together, they rehearsed all that God had done with them, and how he had opened the door of faith unto the Gentiles.

prophets:

Acts 11:25-27 Then departed Barnabas to Tarsus, for to seek Saul: ... And in these days came prophets from Jerusalem unto Antioch.
Acts 15:35 Paul also and Barnabas continued in Antioch, teaching and preaching the word of the Lord, with many others also.
Romans 12:6-7 Having then gifts differing according to the grace that is given to us, whether prophecy, [let us prophesy] according to the proportion of faith; ... Or ministry, [let us wait] on [our] ministering: or he that teacheth, on teaching;
1 Corinthians 12:28-29 And God hath set some in the church, first apostles, secondarily prophets, thirdly teachers, after that miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, governments, diversities of tongues. ... [Are] all apostles? [are] all prophets? [are] all teachers? [are] all workers of miracles?
1 Corinthians 14:24-25 But if all prophesy, and there come in one that believeth not, or [one] unlearned, he is convinced of all, he is judged of all: ... And thus are the secrets of his heart made manifest; and so falling down on [his] face he will worship God, and report that God is in you of a truth.
Ephesians 4:11 And he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers;
1 Thessalonians 5:20 Despise not prophesyings.

Barnabas:

Acts 4:36 And Joses, who by the apostles was surnamed Barnabas, (which is, being interpreted, The son of consolation,) a Levite, [and] of the country of Cyprus,
Acts 11:22-26 Then tidings of these things came unto the ears of the church which was in Jerusalem: and they sent forth Barnabas, that he should go as far as Antioch. ... And when he had found him, he brought him unto Antioch. And it came to pass, that a whole year they assembled themselves with the church, and taught much people. And the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch.
Acts 11:30 Which also they did, and sent it to the elders by the hands of Barnabas and Saul.
Acts 12:25 And Barnabas and Saul returned from Jerusalem, when they had fulfilled [their] ministry, and took with them John, whose surname was Mark.
1 Corinthians 9:6 Or I only and Barnabas, have not we power to forbear working?
Galatians 2:9 And when James, Cephas, and John, who seemed to be pillars, perceived the grace that was given unto me, they gave to me and Barnabas the right hands of fellowship; that we [should go] unto the heathen, and they unto the circumcision.
Galatians 2:13 And the other Jews dissembled likewise with him; insomuch that Barnabas also was carried away with their dissimulation.

Lucius:

Acts 11:20 And some of them were men of Cyprus and Cyrene, which, when they were come to Antioch, spake unto the Grecians, preaching the Lord Jesus.
Romans 16:21 Timotheus my workfellow, and Lucius, and Jason, and Sosipater, my kinsmen, salute you.

which:
etc. or, Herod's foster brother

Herod:

Matthew 14:1-10 At that time Herod the tetrarch heard of the fame of Jesus, ... And he sent, and beheaded John in the prison.
Luke 3:1 Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene,
Luke 3:19-20 But Herod the tetrarch, being reproved by him for Herodias his brother Philip's wife, and for all the evils which Herod had done, ... Added yet this above all, that he shut up John in prison.
Luke 13:31-32 The same day there came certain of the Pharisees, saying unto him, Get thee out, and depart hence: for Herod will kill thee. ... And he said unto them, Go ye, and tell that fox, Behold, I cast out devils, and I do cures to day and to morrow, and the third [day] I shall be perfected.
Luke 23:7-11 And as soon as he knew that he belonged unto Herod's jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod, who himself also was at Jerusalem at that time. ... And Herod with his men of war set him at nought, and mocked [him], and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate.
Philippians 4:22 All the saints salute you, chiefly they that are of Caesar's household.

and Saul:

Acts 13:9 Then Saul, (who also [is called] Paul,) filled with the Holy Ghost, set his eyes on him,
Acts 8:1-3 And Saul was consenting unto his death. And at that time there was a great persecution against the church which was at Jerusalem; and they were all scattered abroad throughout the regions of Judaea and Samaria, except the apostles. ... As for Saul, he made havock of the church, entering into every house, and haling men and women committed [them] to prison.
Acts 9:1 And Saul, yet breathing out threatenings and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, went unto the high priest,
Random Bible VersesNew Quotes



Chain-Reference Bible Search

Mt 14:1. Lk 3:1, 19; 13:31; 23:7. Ac 4:36; 8:1; 9:1; 11:20, 22, 25, 30; 12:25; 13:9; 14:26; 15:35. Ro 12:6; 16:21. 1Co 9:6; 12:28; 14:24. Ga 2:9, 13. Ep 4:11. Php 4:22. 1Th 5:20.

Newest Chat Bible Comment
Comment HereComplete Biblical ResearchComplete Chat Bible Commentary
Please post your comment on Acts 13:1.
Name:

WWW Chat Bible Commentary

User-Posted Comments on Acts 13:1


Recent Chat Bible Comments