Parallel Bible VersionsGreek Bible Study Tools

2 Corinthians 12:11 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— I am become foolish: ye compelled me; for I ought to have been commended of you: for in nothing was I behind the very chiefest apostles, though I am nothing.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— I am become a fool in glorying; ye have compelled me: for I ought to have been commended of you: for in nothing am I behind the very chiefest apostles, though I be nothing.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— I have become foolish; you yourselves compelled me. Actually I should have been commended by you, for in no respect was I inferior to the most eminent apostles, even though I am a nobody.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— I am become a fool in glorying; ye have compelled me: for I ought to have been commended by you: for in nothing am I behind the very greatest apostles, though I am nothing.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— I have become a fool; *ye* have compelled me; for *I* ought to have been commended by you; for I have been nothing behind those who were in surpassing degree apostles, if also I am nothing.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— I have become foolish,—ye, compelled me:—I, in fact, ought, by you, to have been commended; for, not a whit, have I come behind the exceeding overmuch apostles,—even if I am nothing:
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— I have become a fool—boasting; ye—ye did compel me; for I ought by you to have been commended, for in nothing was I behind the very chiefest apostles—even if I am nothing.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— I am become foolish. You have compelled me: for I ought to have been commended by you. For I have no way come short of them that are above measure apostles, although I be nothing.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— I am become a foole in glorying, ye haue compelled me. For I ought to haue beene commended of you: for in nothing am I behinde the very chiefest Apostles, though I be nothing.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— Behold, I have been deficient in mind in my boasting, because you have constrained me; for you were debtors to bear witness concerning me; because in nothing am I less than those apostles who are the most eminent, nevertheless I am not any thing.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— Behold, I have become foolish in my glorying, for ye compelled me. For ye ought to bear witness for me; because I was inferior in nothing to those legates who most excel, although I was nothing.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
I am become 1096
{1096} Prime
γίνομαι
ginomai
{ghin'-om-ahee}
A prolonged and middle form of a primary verb; to cause to be ('gen' -erate), that is, (reflexively) to become (come into being), used with great latitude (literally, figuratively, intensively, etc.).
z5754
<5754> Grammar
Tense - Second Perfect (See G5782)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 97
a fool 878
{0878} Prime
ἄφρων
aphron
{af'-rone}
From G0001 (as a negative particle) and G5424; properly mindless, that is, stupid, (by implication) ignorant, (specifically) egotistic, (practically) rash, or (morally) unbelieving.
in glorying; 2744
{2744} Prime
καυχάομαι
kauchaomai
{kow-khah'-om-ahee}
From some (obsolete) base akin to that of αὐχέω [[aucheo]] (to boast) and G2172; to vaunt (in a good or a bad sense).
z5740
<5740> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 544
ye 5210
{5210} Prime
ὑμεῖς
humeis
{hoo-mice'}
Irregular plural of G4771; you (as subject of verb).
have compelled 315
{0315} Prime
ἀναγκάζω
anagkazo
{an-ang-kad'-zo}
From G0318; to necessitate.
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
me: 3165
{3165} Prime
μέ
me
{meh}
A shorter (and probably original) form of G1691; me.
for 1063
{1063} Prime
γάρ
gar
{gar}
A primary particle; properly assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles).
I 1473
{1473} Prime
ἐγώ
ego
{eg-o'}
A primary pronoun of the first person, 'I' (only expressed when emphatic).
ought 3784
{3784} Prime
ὀφείλω
opheilo
{of-i'-lo}
Including its prolonged form (second form) used in certain tenses. Probably from the base of G3786 (through the idea of accruing); to owe (pecuniarily); figuratively to be under obligation (ought, must, should); morally to fail in duty.
z5707
<5707> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 855
to have been commended 4921
{4921} Prime
συνιστάω
sunistao
{soon-is-tah'-o}
From G4862 and G2476 (including its collateral forms); to set together, that is, (by implication) to introduce (favorably), or (figuratively) to exhibit; intransitively to stand near, or (figuratively) to constitute.
z5745
<5745> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 105
of 5259
{5259} Prime
ὑπό
hupo
{hoop-o'}
A primary preposition; under, that is, (with the genitive) of place (beneath), or with verbs (the agency or means, through); (with the accusative) of place (whither [underneath] or where [below]) or time (when [at]).
you: 5216
{5216} Prime
ὑμῶν
humon
{hoo-mone'}
Genitive case of G5210; of (from or concerning) you.
for 1063
{1063} Prime
γάρ
gar
{gar}
A primary particle; properly assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles).
in nothing 3762
{3762} Prime
οὐδείς
oudeis
{oo-dice'}
From G3761 and G1520; not even one (man, woman or thing), that is, none, nobody, nothing.
am I behind 5302
{5302} Prime
ὑστερέω
hustereo
{hoos-ter-eh'-o}
From G5306; to be later, that is, (by implication) to be inferior; genitively to fall short (be deficient).
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
very chiefest 3029
{3029} Prime
λίαν
lian
{lee'-an}
Of uncertain affinity; much (adverb).
x5228
(5228) Complement
ὑπέρ
huper
{hoop-er'}
A primary preposition; 'over', that is, (with the genitive case) of place, above, beyond, across, or causal, for the sake of, instead, regarding; with the accusative case superior to, more than. In compounds it retains many of the listed applications.
apostles, 652
{0652} Prime
ἀπόστολος
apostolos
{ap-os'-tol-os}
From G0649; a delegate; specifically an ambassador of the Gospel; officially a commissioner of Christ ('apostle'), (with miraculous powers).
y5228
[5228] Standard
ὑπέρ
huper
{hoop-er'}
A primary preposition; 'over', that is, (with the genitive case) of place, above, beyond, across, or causal, for the sake of, instead, regarding; with the accusative case superior to, more than. In compounds it retains many of the listed applications.
though 1499
{1499} Prime
εἰ καί
ei kai
{i kahee}
From G1487 and G2532; if also (or even).
I be 1510
{1510} Prime
εἰμί
eimi
{i-mee'}
First person singular present indicative; a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I exist (used only when emphatic).
z5748
<5748> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 1612
nothing. 3762
{3762} Prime
οὐδείς
oudeis
{oo-dice'}
From G3761 and G1520; not even one (man, woman or thing), that is, none, nobody, nothing.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

2 Corinthians 12:11

_ _ in glorying — omitted in the oldest manuscripts. “I am become a fool.” He sounds a retreat [Bengel].

_ _ ye — emphatic. “It is YE who have compelled me; for I ought to have been commended by you,” instead of having to commend myself.

_ _ am I behind — rather as Greek, “was I behind” when I was with you?

_ _ the very chiefest — rather, as in 2 Corinthians 11:5, “those overmuch apostles.”

_ _ though I be nothing — in myself (1 Corinthians 15:9, 1 Corinthians 15:10).

Matthew Henry's Commentary

2 Corinthians 12:11-21

_ _ In these verses the apostle addresses himself to the Corinthians two ways: —

_ _ I. He blames them for what was faulty in them; namely, that they had not stood up in his defence as they ought to have done, and so made it the more needful for him to insist so much on his own vindication. They in manner compelled him to commend himself, who ought to have been commended of them 2 Corinthians 12:11. And had they, or some among them, not failed on their part, it would have been less needful for him to have said so much on his own behalf. He tells them further that they in particular had good reason to speak well of him, as being in nothing behind the very chief apostles, because he had given them full proof and evidence of his apostleship; for the signs of an apostle were wrought among them in all patience, in signs, and wonders, and mighty deeds. Note, 1. It is a debt we owe to good men to stand up in the defence of their reputation; and we are under special obligations to those we have received benefit by, especially spiritual benefit, to own them as instruments in God's hand of good to us, and to vindicate them when they are calumniated by others. 2. How much soever we are, or ought to be, esteemed by others, we ought always to think humbly of ourselves. See an example of this in this great apostle, who thought himself to be nothing, though in truth he was not behind the greatest apostles — so far was he from seeking praise from men, though he tells them their duty to vindicate his reputation — so far was he from applauding himself, when he was forced to insist upon his own necessary self-defence.

_ _ II. He gives a large account of his behaviour and kind intentions towards them, in which we may observe the character of a faithful minister of the gospel. 1. He was not willing to be burdensome to them, nor did he seek theirs, but them. He says (2 Corinthians 12:13) he had not been burdensome to them, for the time past, and tells them (2 Corinthians 12:14) he would not be burdensome to them for the time to come, when he should come to them. He spared their purses, and did not covet their money: I seek not yours but you. He sought not to enrich himself, but to save their souls: he did not desire to make a property of them to himself, but to gain them over to Christ, whose servant he was. Note, Those who aim at clothing themselves with the fleece of the flock, and take no care of the sheep, are hirelings, and not good shepherds. 2. He would gladly spend and be spent for them (2 Corinthians 12:15); that is, he was willing to take pains and to suffer loss for their good. He would spend his time, his parts, his strength, his interest, his all, to do them service; nay, so spend as to be spent, and be like a candle, which consumes itself to give light to others. 3. He did not abate in his love to them, notwithstanding their unkindness and ingratitude to him; and therefore was contented and glad to take pains with them, though the more abundantly he loved them the less he was loved, 2 Corinthians 12:15. This is applicable to other relations: if others be wanting in their duty to us it does not follow therefore that we may neglect our duty to them. 4. He was careful not only that he himself should not be burdensome, but that none he employed should. This seems to be the meaning of what we read, 2 Corinthians 12:16-18. If it should be objected by any that though he did not himself burden them, yet, being crafty, he caught them with guile, that is, he sent those among them who pillaged them, and afterwards he shared with them in the profit: “This was not so,” says the apostle; “I did not make a gain of you myself, nor by any of those whom I sent; nor did Titus, nor any others — We walked by the same spirit and in the same steps.” They all agreed in this matter to do them all the good they could, without being burdensome to them, to promote the gospel among them and make it as easy to them as possible. Or, this may be read with an interrogation, as utterly disclaiming any guile in himself and others towards them. 5. He was a man who did all things for edifying, 2 Corinthians 12:19. This was his great aim and design, to do good, to lay the foundation well, and then with care and diligence to build the superstructure. 6. He would not shrink from his duty for fear of displeasing them, though he was so careful to make himself easy to them. Therefore he was resolved to be faithful in reproving sin, though he was therein found to be such as they would not, 2 Corinthians 12:20. The apostle here mentions several sins that are too commonly found among professors of religion, and are very reprovable: debates, envyings, wraths, strifes, backbitings, whisperings, swellings, tumults; and, though those who are guilty of these sins can hardly bear to be reproved for them, yet faithful ministers must not fear offending the guilty by sharp reproofs, as they are needful, in public and in private. 7. He was grieved at the apprehension that he should find scandalous sins among them not duly repented of. This, he tells them, would be the cause of great humiliation and lamentation. Note, (1.) The falls and miscarriages of professors cannot but be a humbling consideration to a good minister; and God sometimes takes this way to humble those who might be under temptation to be lifted up: I fear lest my God will humble me among you. (2.) We have reason to bewail those who sin and do not repent, to bewail many that have sinned, and have not repented, 2 Corinthians 12:21. If these have not, as yet, grace to mourn and lament their own case, their case is the more lamentable; and those who love God, and love them, should mourn for them.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

2 Corinthians 12:11

Though I am nothing — Of myself.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

2 Corinthians 12:11

I am become a fool in glorying; ye have compelled me: (5) for I ought to have been commended of you: for in nothing am I behind the very chiefest apostles, though I be nothing.

(5) Again he makes the Corinthians witnesses of those things by which God had sealed his apostleship among them, and again he declares by certain arguments how far he is from all covetousness, and also how he is affectionate towards them.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
become:

2 Corinthians 1:6 And whether we be afflicted, [it is] for your consolation and salvation, which is effectual in the enduring of the same sufferings which we also suffer: or whether we be comforted, [it is] for your consolation and salvation.
2 Corinthians 11:1 Would to God ye could bear with me a little in [my] folly: and indeed bear with me.
2 Corinthians 11:16-17 I say again, Let no man think me a fool; if otherwise, yet as a fool receive me, that I may boast myself a little. ... That which I speak, I speak [it] not after the Lord, but as it were foolishly, in this confidence of boasting.

for in:

2 Corinthians 12:12 Truly the signs of an apostle were wrought among you in all patience, in signs, and wonders, and mighty deeds.
2 Corinthians 11:5 For I suppose I was not a whit behind the very chiefest apostles.
1 Corinthians 3:4-7 For while one saith, I am of Paul; and another, I [am] of Apollos; are ye not carnal? ... So then neither is he that planteth any thing, neither he that watereth; but God that giveth the increase.
1 Corinthians 3:22 Whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come; all are yours;
Galatians 2:6-14 But of these who seemed to be somewhat, (whatsoever they were, it maketh no matter to me: God accepteth no man's person:) for they who seemed [to be somewhat] in conference added nothing to me: ... But when I saw that they walked not uprightly according to the truth of the gospel, I said unto Peter before [them] all, If thou, being a Jew, livest after the manner of Gentiles, and not as do the Jews, why compellest thou the Gentiles to live as do the Jews?

though:

Luke 17:10 So likewise ye, when ye shall have done all those things which are commanded you, say, We are unprofitable servants: we have done that which was our duty to do.
1 Corinthians 3:7 So then neither is he that planteth any thing, neither he that watereth; but God that giveth the increase.
1 Corinthians 15:8-10 And last of all he was seen of me also, as of one born out of due time. ... But by the grace of God I am what I am: and his grace which [was bestowed] upon me was not in vain; but I laboured more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.
Ephesians 3:8 Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this grace given, that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ;
Random Bible VersesNew Quotes



Chain-Reference Bible Search

Lk 17:10. 1Co 3:4, 7, 22; 15:8. 2Co 1:6; 11:1, 5, 16; 12:12. Ga 2:6. Ep 3:8.

Newest Chat Bible Comment
Comment HereComplete Biblical ResearchComplete Chat Bible Commentary
Please post your comment on 2 Corinthians 12:11.
Name:

WWW Chat Bible Commentary

User-Posted Comments on 2 Corinthians 12:11


Recent Chat Bible Comments