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2 Corinthians 11:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Would that ye could bear with me in a little foolishness: but indeed ye do bear with me.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Would to God ye could bear with me a little in [my] folly: and indeed bear with me.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— I wish that you would bear with me in a little foolishness; but indeed you are bearing with me.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— I earnestly wish ye could bear with me a little in [my] folly: and indeed bear with me.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Would that ye would bear with me [in] a little folly; but indeed bear with me.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— I could wish ye would bear with me as to some little foolishness,—Nay! do even bear with me!
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— O that ye were bearing with me a little of the folly, but ye also do bear with me:
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Would to God you could bear with some little of my folly! But do bear with me.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Would to God you could beare with mee a little in my folly, & in deede beare with me.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— BUT I could desire that you could tolerate me a little that I may speak foolishly. Nevertheless tolerate me,
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— I would that ye could bear with me a little, that I might talk foolishly: and indeed, bear ye with me.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Would to God 3785
{3785} Prime
ὄφελον
ophelon
{of'-el-on}
First person singular of a past tense of G3784; I ought (wish), that is, (interjectionally) oh that!.
ye could bear y430
[0430] Standard
ἀνέξομαι
anechomai
{an-ekh'-om-ahee}
Middle voice from G0303 and G2192; to hold oneself up against, that is, (figuratively) put up with.
z5711
<5711> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 184
with x430
(0430) Complement
ἀνέξομαι
anechomai
{an-ekh'-om-ahee}
Middle voice from G0303 and G2192; to hold oneself up against, that is, (figuratively) put up with.
me 3450
{3450} Prime
μοῦ
mou
{moo}
The simpler from of G1700; of me.
a little y3397
[3397] Standard
μικρόν
mikron
{mik-ron'}
Masculine or neuter singular of G3398 (as noun); a small space of time or degree.
x3398
(3398) Complement
μικρός
mikros
{mik-ros'}
Apparently a primary word, including the comparative (second form); small (in size, quantity, number or (figuratively) dignity).
in [my] folly: 877
{0877} Prime
ἀφροσύνη
aphrosune
{af-ros-oo'-nay}
From G0878; senselessness, that is, (euphemistically) egotism; (morally) recklessness.
and y2532
[2532] Standard
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
x235
(0235) Complement
ἀλλά
alla
{al-lah'}
Neuter plural of G0243; properly other things, that is, (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations).
indeed y235
[0235] Standard
ἀλλά
alla
{al-lah'}
Neuter plural of G0243; properly other things, that is, (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations).
x2532
(2532) Complement
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
bear y430
[0430] Standard
ἀνέξομαι
anechomai
{an-ekh'-om-ahee}
Middle voice from G0303 and G2192; to hold oneself up against, that is, (figuratively) put up with.
z5736
<5736> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 618
with x430
(0430) Complement
ἀνέξομαι
anechomai
{an-ekh'-om-ahee}
Middle voice from G0303 and G2192; to hold oneself up against, that is, (figuratively) put up with.
me. 3450
{3450} Prime
μοῦ
mou
{moo}
The simpler from of G1700; of me.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

2 Corinthians 11:1

_ _ 2 Corinthians 11:1-33. Through jealousy over the Corinthians, who made more account of the false apostles than of him, he is obliged to commend himself as in many respects superior.

_ _ Would to God — Translate as Greek, “I would that.”

_ _ bear with me — I may ask not unreasonably to be borne with; not so the false apostles (2 Corinthians 11:4, 2 Corinthians 11:20).

_ _ my — not in the oldest manuscripts.

_ _ folly — The Greek is a milder term than that for “foolishness” in 1 Corinthians 3:19; Matthew 5:22; Matthew 25:2. The Greek for “folly” here implies imprudence; the Greek for “foolishness” includes the idea of perversity and wickedness.

_ _ and indeed bear — A request (so 2 Corinthians 11:16). But the Greek and the sense favor the translation, “But indeed (I need not wish it, for) ye do bear with me”; still I wish you to bear with me further, while I enter at large into self-commendations.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

2 Corinthians 11:1-4

_ _ Here we may observe, 1. The apology the apostle makes for going about to commend himself. He is loth to enter upon this subject of self-commendation: Would to God you could bear with me a little in my folly, 2 Corinthians 11:1. He calls this folly, because too often it is really no better. In his case it was necessary; yet, seeing others might apprehend it to be folly in him, he desires them to bear with it. Note, As much against the grain as it is with a proud man to acknowledge his infirmities, so much is it against the grain with a humble man to speak in his own praise. It is no pleasure to a good man to speak well of himself, yet in some cases it is lawful, namely, when it is for the advantage of others, or for our own necessary vindication; as thus it was here. For, 2. We have the reasons for what the apostle did. (1.) To preserve the Corinthians from being corrupted by the insinuations of the false apostles, 2 Corinthians 11:2, 2 Corinthians 11:3. He tells them he was jealous over them with godly jealousy; he was afraid lest their faith should be weakened by hearkening to such suggestions as tended to lessen their regard to his ministry, by which they were brought to the Christian faith. He had espoused them to one husband, that is, converted them to Christianity (and the conversion of a soul is its marriage to the Lord Jesus); and he was desirous to present them as a chaste virgin — pure, and spotless, and faithful, not having their minds corrupted with false doctrines by false teachers, as Eve was beguiled by the subtlety of the serpent. This godly jealousy in the apostle was a mixture of love and fear; and faithful ministers cannot but be afraid and concerned for their people, lest they should lose that which they have received, and turn from what they have embraced, especially when deceivers have gone abroad, or have crept in among them. (2.) To vindicate himself against the false apostles, forasmuch as they could not pretend they had another Jesus, or another Spirit, or another gospel, to preach to them, 2 Corinthians 11:4. If this had been the case, there would have been some colour of reason to bear with them, or to hearken to them. But seeing there is but one Jesus, one Spirit, and one gospel, that is, or at least that ought to be, preached to them and received by them, what reason could there be why the Corinthians should be prejudiced against him, who first converted them to the faith, by the artifices of any adversary? It was a just occasion of jealousy that such persons designed to preach another Jesus, another Spirit, and another gospel.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

2 Corinthians 11:1

I wish ye would bear — So does he pave the way for what might otherwise have given offence. With my folly — Of commending myself; which to many may appear folly; and really would be so, were it not on this occasion absolutely necessary.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

2 Corinthians 11:1

Would (1) to God ye could bear with me a little in [my] folly: and indeed bear with me.

(1) He grants that in a way he is playing the fool in this exalting of things, but he adds that he does it against his will for their profit, because he sees them deceived by certain vain and crafty men, through the craft and subtilty of Satan.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
Would:

Numbers 11:29 And Moses said unto him, Enviest thou for my sake? would God that all the LORD'S people were prophets, [and] that the LORD would put his spirit upon them!
Joshua 7:7 And Joshua said, Alas, O Lord GOD, wherefore hast thou at all brought this people over Jordan, to deliver us into the hand of the Amorites, to destroy us? would to God we had been content, and dwelt on the other side Jordan!
2 Kings 5:3 And she said unto her mistress, Would God my lord [were] with the prophet that [is] in Samaria! for he would recover him of his leprosy.
Acts 26:29 And Paul said, I would to God, that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day, were both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds.
1 Corinthians 4:8 Now ye are full, now ye are rich, ye have reigned as kings without us: and I would to God ye did reign, that we also might reign with you.

bear with me a:

2 Corinthians 11:4 For if he that cometh preacheth another Jesus, whom we have not preached, or [if] ye receive another spirit, which ye have not received, or another gospel, which ye have not accepted, ye might well bear with [him].
Acts 18:14 And when Paul was now about to open [his] mouth, Gallio said unto the Jews, If it were a matter of wrong or wicked lewdness, O [ye] Jews, reason would that I should bear with you:
Hebrews 5:2 Who can have compassion on the ignorant, and on them that are out of the way; for that he himself also is compassed with infirmity.

in:

2 Corinthians 11:16-17 I say again, Let no man think me a fool; if otherwise, yet as a fool receive me, that I may boast myself a little. ... That which I speak, I speak [it] not after the Lord, but as it were foolishly, in this confidence of boasting.
2 Corinthians 11:19 For ye suffer fools gladly, seeing ye [yourselves] are wise.
2 Corinthians 11:21 I speak as concerning reproach, as though we had been weak. Howbeit whereinsoever any is bold, (I speak foolishly,) I am bold also.
2 Corinthians 5:13 For whether we be beside ourselves, [it is] to God: or whether we be sober, [it is] for your cause.
2 Corinthians 12:11 I am become a fool in glorying; ye have compelled me: for I ought to have been commended of you: for in nothing am I behind the very chiefest apostles, though I be nothing.
1 Corinthians 1:21 For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe.
1 Corinthians 3:18 Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you seemeth to be wise in this world, let him become a fool, that he may be wise.
1 Corinthians 4:10 We [are] fools for Christ's sake, but ye [are] wise in Christ; we [are] weak, but ye [are] strong; ye [are] honourable, but we [are] despised.

bear with me:
or, ye do bear with me
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Chain-Reference Bible Search

Nu 11:29. Jsh 7:7. 2K 5:3. Ac 18:14; 26:29. 1Co 1:21; 3:18; 4:8, 10. 2Co 5:13; 11:4, 16, 19, 21; 12:11. He 5:2.

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