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1 Timothy 2:9 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— In like manner, that women adorn themselves in modest apparel, with shamefastness and sobriety; not with braided hair, and gold or pearls or costly raiment;
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— In like manner also, that women adorn themselves in modest apparel, with shamefacedness and sobriety; not with broided hair, or gold, or pearls, or costly array;
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Likewise, [I want] women to adorn themselves with proper clothing, modestly and discreetly, not with braided hair and gold or pearls or costly garments,
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— In like manner also, that women adorn themselves in decent apparel, with modesty and sobriety; not with broidered hair, or gold, or pearls, or costly array,
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— In like manner also that the women in decent deportment and dress adorn themselves with modesty and discretion, not with plaited [hair] and gold, or pearls, or costly clothing,
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— In the same way, that, the women, in seemly attire, with modesty and sober-mindedness, be adorning themselves,—not with plaitings and ornamentation of gold, or with pearls, or with costly apparel,—
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— in like manner also the women, in becoming apparel, with modesty and sobriety to adorn themselves, not in braided hair, or gold, or pearls, or garments of great price,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— In like manner, women also in decent apparel: adorning themselves with modesty and sobriety, not with plaited hair, or gold, or pearls, or costly attire:
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— In like maner also, that women adorne themselues in modest apparell, with shamefastnesse and sobrietie, not with broided haire, or gold, or pearles, or costly aray,
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— So also let women with decorous simplicity of apparel, with modesty and with chastity, adorn themselves, not with braidings, and with gold, and with pearls, and with fine vestments,
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— So also, that women [appear] in a chaste fashion of dress; and that their adorning be with modesty and chastity; not with curls, or with gold, or with pearls, or with splendid robes;

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
In like manner 5615
{5615} Prime
ὡσαύτως
hosautos
{ho-sow'-toce}
From G5613 and an adverb from G0846; as thus, that is, in the same way.
also, 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
that women 1135
{1135} Prime
γυνή
gune
{goo-nay'}
Probably from the base of G1096; a woman; specifically a wife.
adorn 2885
{2885} Prime
κοσμέω
kosmeo
{kos-meh'-o}
From G2889; to put in proper order, that is, decorate (literally or figuratively); specifically to snuff (a wick).
z5721
<5721> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 647
themselves 1438
{1438} Prime
ἑαυτοῦ
heautou
{heh-ow-too'}
(Including all the other cases); from a reflexive pronoun otherwise obsolete and the genitive (dative or accusative) of G0846; him (her, it, them, also [in conjunction with the personal pronoun of the other persons] my, thy, our, your) -self (-selves), etc.
in 1722
{1722} Prime
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
modest 2887
{2887} Prime
κόσμιος
kosmios
{kos'-mee-os}
From G2889 (in its primary sense); orderly, that is, decorous.
apparel, 2689
{2689} Prime
καταστολή
katastole
{kat-as-tol-ay'}
From G2687; a deposit, that is, (specifically) costume.
with 3326
{3326} Prime
μετά
meta
{met-ah'}
A primary preposition (often used adverbially); properly denoting accompaniment; 'amid' (local or causal); modified variously according to the case (genitive case association, or accusative case succession) with which it is joined; occupying an intermediate position between G0575 or G1537 and G1519 or G4314; less intimate than G1722, and less close than G4862).
shamefacedness 127
{0127} Prime
αἰδώς
aidos
{ahee-doce'}
Perhaps from G0001 (as a negative particle) and G1492 (through the idea of downcast eyes); bashfulness, that is, (towards men), modesty or (towards God) awe.
and 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
sobriety; 4997
{4997} Prime
σωφροσύνη
sophrosune
{so-fros-oo'-nay}
From G4998; soundness of mind, that is, (literally) sanity or (figuratively) self control.
not 3361
{3361} Prime
μή
me
{may}
A primary particle of qualified negation (whereas G3756 expresses an absolute denial); (adverbially) not, (conjugationally) lest; also (as interrogitive implying a negative answer [whereas G3756 expects an affirmative one]); whether.
with 1722
{1722} Prime
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
broided hair, 4117
{4117} Prime
πλέγμα
plegma
{pleg'-mah}
From G4120; a plait (of hair).
or 2228
{2228} Prime

e
{ay}
A primary particle of distinction between two connected terms; disjunctive, or; comparative, than.
gold, 5557
{5557} Prime
χρυσός
chrusos
{khroo-sos'}
Perhaps from the base of G5530 (through the idea of the utility of the metal); gold; by extension a golden article, as an ornament or coin.
or 2228
{2228} Prime

e
{ay}
A primary particle of distinction between two connected terms; disjunctive, or; comparative, than.
pearls, 3135
{3135} Prime
μαργαρίτης
margarites
{mar-gar-ee'-tace}
From μάργαρος [[margaros]] (a pearl oyster); a pearl.
or 2228
{2228} Prime

e
{ay}
A primary particle of distinction between two connected terms; disjunctive, or; comparative, than.
costly 4185
{4185} Prime
πολυτελής
poluteles
{pol-oo-tel-ace'}
From G4183 and G5056; extremely expensive.
array; 2441
{2441} Prime
ἱματισμός
himatismos
{him-at-is-mos'}
From G2439; clothing.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

1 Timothy 2:9-10

_ _ The context requires that we understand these directions as to women, in relation to their deportment in public worship, though the rules will hold good on other occasions also.

_ _ in modest apparel — “in seemly guise” [Ellicott]. The adjective means properly. orderly, decorous, becoming; the noun in secular writings means conduct, bearing. But here “apparel.” Women are apt to love fine dress; and at Ephesus the riches of some (1 Timothy 6:17) would lead them to dress luxuriously. The Greek in Titus 2:3 is a more general term meaning “deportment.”

_ _ shamefacedness — Trench spells this word according to its true derivation, “shamefastness” (that which is made fast by an honorable shame); as “steadfastness” (compare 1 Timothy 2:11, 1 Timothy 2:12).

_ _ sobriety — “self-restraint” [Alford]. Habitual inner self-government [Trench]. I prefer Ellicott’s translation, “sober-mindedness”: the well-balanced state of mind arising from habitual self-restraint.

_ _ withGreek, “in.”

_ _ braided hair — literally, “plaits,” that is, plaited hair: probably with the “gold and pearls” intertwined (1 Peter 3:3). Such gaud is characteristic of the spiritual harlot (Revelation 17:4).

Matthew Henry's Commentary

1 Timothy 2:9-15

_ _ I. Here is a charge, that women who profess the Christian religion should be modest, sober, silent, and submissive, as becomes their place. 1. They must be very modest in their apparel, not affecting gaudiness, gaiety, or costliness (you may read the vanity of a person's mind in the gaiety and gaudiness of his habit), because they have better ornaments with which they should adorn themselves, with good works. Note, Good works are the best ornament; these are, in the sight of God, of great price. Those that profess godliness should, in their dress, as well as other things, act as becomes their profession; instead of laying out their money on fine clothes, they must lay it out in works of piety and charity, which are properly called good works. 2. Women must learn the principles of their religion, learn Christ, learn the scriptures; they must not think that their sex excuses them from that learning which is necessary to salvation. 3. They must be silent, submissive, and subject, and not usurp authority. The reason given is because Adam was first formed, then Eve out of him, to denote her subordination to him and dependence upon him; and that she was made for him, to be a help-meet for him. And as she was last in the creation, which is one reason for her subjection, so she was first in the transgression, and that is another reason. Adam was not deceived, that is, not first; the serpent did not immediately set upon him, but the woman was first in the transgression (2 Corinthians 11:3), and it was part of the sentence, Thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee, Genesis 3:16. But it is a word of comfort (1 Timothy 2:15) that those who continue in sobriety shall be saved in child-bearing, or with child-bearing — the Messiah, who was born of a woman, should break the serpent's head (Genesis 3:15); or the sentence which they are under for sin shall be no bar to their acceptance with Christ, if they continue in faith, and charity, and holiness, with sobriety.

_ _ II. Here observe, 1. The extensiveness of the rules of Christianity; they reach not only to men, but to women, not only to their persons, but also to their dress, which must be modest, like their sex; and to their outward deportment and behaviour, it must be in silence, with all subjection. 2. Women are to profess godliness as well as men; for they are baptized, and thereby stand engaged to exercise themselves to godliness; and, to their honour be it spoken, many of them were eminent professors of Christianity in the days of the apostles, as the book of Acts will inform us. 3. Women being more in danger of exceeding in their apparel, it was more necessary to caution them in this respect. 4. The best ornaments for professors of godliness are good works. 5. According to Paul, women must be learners, and are not allowed to be public teachers in the church; for teaching is an office of authority, and the woman must not usurp authority over the man, but is to be in silence. But, notwithstanding this prohibition, good women may and ought to teach their children at home the principles of religion. Timothy from a child had known the holy scriptures; and who should teach him but his mother and grandmother? 2 Timothy 3:15. Aquila and his wife Priscilla expounded unto Apollos the way of God more perfectly; but then they did it privately, for they took him unto them, Acts 18:26. 6. Here are two very good reasons given for the man's authority over the woman, and her subjection to the man, 1 Timothy 2:13, 1 Timothy 2:14. Adam was first formed, then Eve; she was created for the man, and not the man for the woman (1 Corinthians 11:9); then she was deceived, and brought the man into the transgression. 7. Though the difficulties and dangers of childbearing are many and great, as they are part of the punishment inflicted on the sex for Eve's transgression, yet here is much for her support and encouragement: Notwithstanding she shall be saved, etc. Though in sorrow, yet she shall bring forth, and be a living mother of living children; with this proviso, that they continue in faith, and charity, and holiness, with sobriety: and women, under the circumstance of child-bearing should by faith lay hold of this promise for their support in the needful time.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

1 Timothy 2:9

With sobriety — Which, in St. Paul's sense, is the virtue which governs our whole life according to true wisdom. Not with curled hair, not with gold — Worn by way of ornament. Not with pearls — Jewels of any kind: a part is put for the whole. Not with costly raiment — These four are expressly forbidden by name to all women (here is no exception) professing godliness, and no art of man can reconcile with the Christian profession the wilful violation of an express command.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

1 Timothy 2:9

(7) In like manner also, that women adorn themselves in modest apparel, with shamefacedness and sobriety; not with broided hair, or gold, or pearls, or costly array;

(7) Thirdly, he appoints women to learn in the public assemblies with silence and modesty, being dressed pleasantly, without any overindulgence or excess in their clothing.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
that:

1 Peter 3:3-5 Whose adorning let it not be that outward [adorning] of plaiting the hair, and of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel; ... For after this manner in the old time the holy women also, who trusted in God, adorned themselves, being in subjection unto their own husbands:

with shamefacedness:

Proverbs 7:10 And, behold, there met him a woman [with] the attire of an harlot, and subtil of heart.
Isaiah 3:16 Moreover the LORD saith, Because the daughters of Zion are haughty, and walk with stretched forth necks and wanton eyes, walking and mincing [as] they go, and making a tinkling with their feet:
Titus 2:3-5 The aged women likewise, that [they be] in behaviour as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things; ... [To be] discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed.

not:

Genesis 24:53 And the servant brought forth jewels of silver, and jewels of gold, and raiment, and gave [them] to Rebekah: he gave also to her brother and to her mother precious things.
Exodus 35:22-23 And they came, both men and women, as many as were willing hearted, [and] brought bracelets, and earrings, and rings, and tablets, all jewels of gold: and every man that offered [offered] an offering of gold unto the LORD. ... And every man, with whom was found blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine linen, and goats' [hair], and red skins of rams, and badgers' skins, brought [them].
2 Kings 9:30 And when Jehu was come to Jezreel, Jezebel heard [of it]; and she painted her face, and tired her head, and looked out at a window.
Esther 5:1 Now it came to pass on the third day, that Esther put on [her] royal [apparel], and stood in the inner court of the king's house, over against the king's house: and the king sat upon his royal throne in the royal house, over against the gate of the house.
Psalms 45:13-14 The king's daughter [is] all glorious within: her clothing [is] of wrought gold. ... She shall be brought unto the king in raiment of needlework: the virgins her companions that follow her shall be brought unto thee.
Psalms 149:4 For the LORD taketh pleasure in his people: he will beautify the meek with salvation.
Proverbs 31:22 She maketh herself coverings of tapestry; her clothing [is] silk and purple.
Isaiah 3:18-24 In that day the Lord will take away the bravery of [their] tinkling ornaments [about their feet], and [their] cauls, and [their] round tires like the moon, ... And it shall come to pass, [that] instead of sweet smell there shall be stink; and instead of a girdle a rent; and instead of well set hair baldness; and instead of a stomacher a girding of sackcloth; [and] burning instead of beauty.
Isaiah 61:4 And they shall build the old wastes, they shall raise up the former desolations, and they shall repair the waste cities, the desolations of many generations.
Jeremiah 2:32 Can a maid forget her ornaments, [or] a bride her attire? yet my people have forgotten me days without number.
Jeremiah 4:30 And [when] thou [art] spoiled, what wilt thou do? Though thou clothest thyself with crimson, though thou deckest thee with ornaments of gold, though thou rentest thy face with painting, in vain shalt thou make thyself fair; [thy] lovers will despise thee, they will seek thy life.
Ezekiel 16:9-16 Then washed I thee with water; yea, I throughly washed away thy blood from thee, and I anointed thee with oil. ... And of thy garments thou didst take, and deckedst thy high places with divers colours, and playedst the harlot thereupon: [the like things] shall not come, neither shall it be [so].
Matthew 6:28 And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:
Matthew 6:29 And yet I say unto you, That even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.
Matthew 11:8 But what went ye out for to see? A man clothed in soft raiment? behold, they that wear soft [clothing] are in kings' houses.

broided:
or, plaited,
1 Peter 3:3 Whose adorning let it not be that outward [adorning] of plaiting the hair, and of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel;
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Gn 24:53. Ex 35:22. 2K 9:30. Es 5:1. Ps 45:13; 149:4. Pv 7:10; 31:22. Is 3:16, 18; 61:4. Jr 2:32; 4:30. Ezk 16:9. Mt 6:28, 29; 11:8. Tit 2:3. 1P 3:3.

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