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1 Peter 4:12 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial among you, which cometh upon you to prove you, as though a strange thing happened unto you:
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you:
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery ordeal among you, which comes upon you for your testing, as though some strange thing were happening to you;
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened to you:
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Beloved, take not [as] strange the fire [of persecution] which has taken place amongst you for [your] trial, as if a strange thing was happening to you;
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Beloved! be not held in surprise by the burning among you, which, for putting you to the proof, is befalling you, as though a, surprising, thing were happening unto you;
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— Beloved, think it not strange at the fiery suffering among you that is coming to try you, as if a strange thing were happening to you,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Dearly beloved, think not strange the burning heat which is to try you: as if some new thing happened to you.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Beloued, thinke it not strange concerning the fiery triall, which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened vnto you.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— My beloved, be not amazed at the temptations which you have, as that something strange happeneth to you, because for your probation they have been;
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— My beloved, be not dismayed at the trials that befall you, as if some strange thing had come upon you; for these things are for your probation.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Beloved, 27
{0027} Prime
ἀγαπητός
agapetos
{ag-ap-ay-tos'}
From G0025; beloved.
think it y3579
[3579] Standard
ξενίζω
xenizo
{xen-id'-zo}
From G3581; to be a host (passively a guest); by implication be (make, appear) strange.
z0
<0000> Grammar
The original word in the Greek or Hebrew is translated by more than one word in the English. The English translation is separated by one or more other words from the original.
not y3361
[3361] Standard
μή
me
{may}
A primary particle of qualified negation (whereas G3756 expresses an absolute denial); (adverbially) not, (conjugationally) lest; also (as interrogitive implying a negative answer [whereas G3756 expects an affirmative one]); whether.
strange 3579
{3579} Prime
ξενίζω
xenizo
{xen-id'-zo}
From G3581; to be a host (passively a guest); by implication be (make, appear) strange.
z5744
<5744> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Imperative (See G5794)
Count - 48
x3361
(3361) Complement
μή
me
{may}
A primary particle of qualified negation (whereas G3756 expresses an absolute denial); (adverbially) not, (conjugationally) lest; also (as interrogitive implying a negative answer [whereas G3756 expects an affirmative one]); whether.
concerning the y5213
[5213] Standard
ὑμῖν
humin
{hoo-min'}
Irregular dative case of G5210; to (with or by) you.
x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
fiery trial 4451
{4451} Prime
πύρωσις
purosis
{poo'-ro-sis}
From G4448; ignition, that is, (specifically) smelting (figuratively conflagration, calamity as a test).
which 1722
{1722} Prime
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
x5213
(5213) Complement
ὑμῖν
humin
{hoo-min'}
Irregular dative case of G5210; to (with or by) you.
is 1096
{1096} Prime
γίνομαι
ginomai
{ghin'-om-ahee}
A prolonged and middle form of a primary verb; to cause to be ('gen' -erate), that is, (reflexively) to become (come into being), used with great latitude (literally, figuratively, intensively, etc.).
z5740
<5740> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 544
to y4314
[4314] Standard
πρός
pros
{pros}
A strengthened form of G4253; a preposition of direction; forward to, that is, toward (with the genitive case the side of, that is, pertaining to; with the dative case by the side of, that is, near to; usually with the accusative case the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, that is, whither or for which it is predicated).
try 3986
{3986} Prime
πειρασμός
peirasmos
{pi-ras-mos'}
From G3985; a putting to proof (by experiment [of good], experience [of evil], solicitation, discipline or provocation); by implication adversity.
x4314
(4314) Complement
πρός
pros
{pros}
A strengthened form of G4253; a preposition of direction; forward to, that is, toward (with the genitive case the side of, that is, pertaining to; with the dative case by the side of, that is, near to; usually with the accusative case the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, that is, whither or for which it is predicated).
you, 5213
{5213} Prime
ὑμῖν
humin
{hoo-min'}
Irregular dative case of G5210; to (with or by) you.
as 5613
{5613} Prime
ὡς
hos
{hoce}
Probably adverb of comparative from G3739; which how, that is, in that manner (very variously used as shown).
though some strange thing 3581
{3581} Prime
ξένος
xenos
{xen'-os}
Apparently a primary word; foreign (literally alien, or figuratively novel); by implication a guest or (vice-versa) entertainer.
happened 4819
{4819} Prime
συμβαίνω
sumbaino
{soom-bah'-ee-no}
From G4862 and the base of G0939; to walk (figuratively transpire) together, that is, concur (take place).
z5723
<5723> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Participle (See G5796)
Count - 2549
unto you: 5213
{5213} Prime
ὑμῖν
humin
{hoo-min'}
Irregular dative case of G5210; to (with or by) you.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

1 Peter 4:12

_ _ strange — they might think it strange that God should allow His chosen children to be sore tried.

_ _ fiery trial — like the fire by which metals are tested and their dross removed. The Greek adds, “in your case.”

_ _ which is to try youGreek, “which is taking place for a trial to you.” Instead of its “happening to you” as some strange and untoward chance, it “is taking place” with the gracious design of trying you; God has a wise design in it — a consolatory reflection.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

1 Peter 4:12-19

_ _ The frequent repetition of counsel and comfort to Christians, considered as sufferers, in every chapter of this epistle, shows that the greatest danger these new converts were in arose from the persecutions to which their embracing Christianity exposed them. The good behaviour of Christians under sufferings is the most difficult part of their duty, but yet necessary both for the honour of Christ and their own comfort; and therefore the apostle, having extorted them in the former part of this chapter to the great duty of mortification, comes here to direct them in the necessary duty of patience under sufferings. An unmortified spirit is very unfit to bear trials. Observe,

_ _ I. The apostle's kind manner of address to these poor despised Christians: they were his beloved, 1 Peter 4:9.

_ _ II. His advice to them, relating to their sufferings, which is,

_ _ 1. That they should not think them strange, nor be surprised at them, as if some unexpected event befell them; for,

_ _ (1.) Though they be sharp and fiery, yet they are designed only to try, not to ruin them, to try their sincerity, strength, patience, and trust in God. On the contrary, they ought rather to rejoice under their sufferings, because theirs may properly be called Christ's sufferings. They are of the same kind, and for the same cause, that Christ suffered; they make us conformable to him; he suffers in them, and feels in our infirmities; and, if we be partakers of his sufferings, we shall also be make partakers of his glory, and shall meet him with exceeding joy at his great appearing to judge his enemies, and crown his faithful servants, 2 Thessalonians 1:7, etc. Learn, [1.] True Christians love and own the children of God in their lowest and most distressing circumstances. The apostle owns these poor afflicted Christians, and calls them his beloved. True Christians never look more amiable one to another than in their adversities. [2.] There is no reason for Christians to think strange, or to wonder, at the unkindnesses and persecutions of the world, because they are forewarned of them. Christ himself endured them; and forsaking all, denying ourselves, are the terms upon which Christ accepts of us to be his disciples. [3.] Christians ought not only to be patient, but to rejoice, in their sharpest sorest sufferings for Christ, because they are tokens of divine favour; they promote the gospel and prepare for glory. Those who rejoice in their sufferings for Christ shall eternally triumph and rejoice with him in glory.

_ _ (2.) From the fiery trial the apostle descends to a lower degree of persecution — that of the tongue by slander and reproach, 1 Peter 4:14. He supposes that this sort of suffering would fall to their lot: they would be reviled, evil-spoken of, and slandered for the name or sake of Christ. In such case he asserts, Happy are you, the reason of which is, “Because you have the spirit of God with you, to fortify and comfort you; and the Spirit of God is also the Spirit of glory, that will carry you through all, bring you off gloriously, and prepare and seal you up for eternal glory. This glorious Spirit resteth upon you, resideth with you, dwelleth in you, supporteth you, and is pleased with you; and is not this an unspeakable privilege? By your patience and fortitude in suffering, by your dependence upon the promises of God, and adhering to the word which the Holy Spirit hath revealed, he is on your part glorified; but by the contempt and reproaches cast upon you the Spirit itself is evil-spoken of and blasphemed.” Learn, [1.] The best men and the best things usually meet with reproaches in the world. Jesus Christ and his followers, the Spirit of God and the gospel, are all evil-spoken of. [2.] The happiness of good people not only consists with, but even flows from their afflictions: Happy are you. [3.] That man who hath the Spirit of God resting upon him cannot be miserable, let his afflictions be ever so great: Happy are you; for the Spirit of God, etc. [4.] The blasphemies and reproaches which evil men cast upon good people are taken by the Spirit of God as cast upon himself: On their part he is evil-spoken of. [5.] When good people are vilified for the name of Christ his Holy Spirit is glorified in them.

_ _ 2. That they should take care they did not suffer justly, as evil-doers, 1 Peter 4:15. One would think such a caution as this needless to such an excellent set of Christians as these were. But their enemies charged them with these and other foul crimes: therefore the apostle, when he was settling the rules of the Christian religion, thought these cautions necessary, forbidding every one of them to hurt the life or the estate and property of any one, or to do any sort of evil, or, without call and necessity, to play the bishop in another man's charge, or busy himself in other men's matters. To this caution he adds a direction, that if any man suffer for the cause of Christianity, and with a patient Christian spirit, he ought not to account it a shame, but an honour to him; and ought to glorify God who hath thus dignified him, 1 Peter 4:16. Learn, (1.) The best of men need to be warned against the worst of sins. (2.) There is very little comfort in sufferings when we bring them upon ourselves by our own sin and folly. It is not the suffering, but the cause, that makes the martyr. (3.) We have reason to thank God for the honour if he calls us out to suffer for his truth and gospel, for our adherence to any of the doctrines or duties of Christianity.

_ _ 3. That their trials were now at hand, and they should stand prepared accordingly, 1 Peter 4:17, 1 Peter 4:18.

_ _ (1.) He tells them that the time had come when judgment must begin at the house of God. The usual method of Providence has been this: When God brings great calamities and sore judgments upon whole nations, he generally begins with his own people, Isaiah 10:12; Jeremiah 25:29; Ezekiel 9:6. “Such a time of universal calamity is now at hand, which was foretold by our Saviour, Matthew 24:9, Matthew 24:10. This renders all the foregoing exhortations to patience necessary for you. And you have two considerations to support you.” [1.] “That these judgments will but begin with you that are God's house and family, and will soon be over: your trials and corrections will not last long.” [2.] “Your troubles will be but light and short, in comparison of what shall befall the wicked world, your own countrymen the Jews, and the infidels and idolatrous people among whom you live: What shall the end be of those who obey not the gospel of God?” Learn, First, The best of God's servants, his own household, have so much amiss in them as renders it fit and necessary that God should sometimes correct and punish them with his judgments: Judgment begins at the house of God. Secondly, Those who are the family of God have their worst things in this life. Their worst condition is tolerable, and will soon be over. Thirdly, Such persons or societies of men as disobey the gospel of God are not of his church and household, though possibly they may make the loudest pretensions. The apostle distinguishes the disobedient from the house of God. Fourthly, The sufferings of good people in this life are demonstrations of the unspeakable torments that are coming upon the disobedient and unbelieving: What shall the end be of those that obey not the gospel? Who can express or say how dreadful their end will be?

_ _ (2.) He intimates the irremediable doom of the wicked: If the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and sinner appear, 1 Peter 4:18. This whole verse is taken from Proverbs 11:31, Behold the righteous shall be recompensed in the earth; how much more the wicked and the sinner? This the Septuagint translates exactly as the apostle here quotes it. Hence we may learn, [1.] The grievous sufferings of good people in this world are sad presages of much heavier judgments coming upon impenitent sinners. But, if we take the salvation here in the highest sense, then we may learn, [2.] It is as much as the best can do to secure the salvation of their souls; there are so many sufferings, temptations, and difficulties to be overcome, so many sins to be mortified, the gate is so strait and the way so narrow, that it is as much as the righteous can do to be saved. Let the absolute necessity of salvation balance the difficulty of it. Consider, Your difficulties are greatest at first; God offers his grace and help; the contest will not last long; be but faithful to the death, and God will give you the crown of life, Revelation 2:10. [3.] The ungodly and the sinner are unquestionably in a state of damnation. Where shall they appear? How will they stand before their Judge? Where can they show their heads? If the righteous scarcely be saved, the wicked must certainly perish.

_ _ 4. That when called to suffer, according to the will of God, they should look chiefly to the safety of their souls, which are put into hazard by affliction, and cannot be kept secure otherwise than by committing them to God, who will undertake the charge, if we commit them to him in well-doing; for he is their Creator, and has out of mere grace made many kind promises to them of eternal salvation, in which he will show himself faithful and true, 1 Peter 4:19. Learn, (1.) All the sufferings that befall good people come upon them according to the will of God. (2.) It is the duty of Christians, in all their distresses, to look more to the keeping of their souls than to the preserving of their bodies. The soul is of greatest value, and yet in most danger. If suffering from without raise uneasiness, vexation, and other sinful and tormenting passions within, the soul is then the greatest sufferer. If the soul be not well kept, persecution will drive people to apostasy, Psalms 125:3. (3.) The only way to keep the soul well is to commit it to God, in well-doing. Commit your souls to God by solemn dedication, prayer, and patient perseverance in well-doing, Romans 2:7. (4.) Good people, when they are in affliction, have great encouragement to commit their souls to God, because he is their Creator, and faithful in all his promises.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

1 Peter 4:12

Wonder not at the burning which is among you — This is the literal meaning of the expression. It seems to include both martyrdom itself, which so frequently was by fire, and all the other sufferings joined with, or previous to, it; which is permitted by the wisdom of God for your trial. Be not surprised at this.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

1 Peter 4:12

(11) Beloved, think it not (d) strange (12) concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you:

(11) Because that cross is joined with the sincere profession of religion, the apostle fitly repeats what he touched on before, warning us not to be troubled at persecutions and afflictions, as at a new and strange thing.

(d) As though some new thing had befallen you, which you never thought of before.

(12) The first reason: because the Lord does not mean to confuse us with his fire (as it were) but to purge us of our impurities and make us perfect.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
think:

1 Peter 4:4 Wherein they think it strange that ye run not with [them] to the same excess of riot, speaking evil of [you]:
Isaiah 28:21 For the LORD shall rise up as [in] mount Perazim, he shall be wroth as [in] the valley of Gibeon, that he may do his work, his strange work; and bring to pass his act, his strange act.

the fiery:

1 Peter 1:7 That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unto praise and honour and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ:
Daniel 11:35 And [some] of them of understanding shall fall, to try them, and to purge, and to make [them] white, [even] to the time of the end: because [it is] yet for a time appointed.
1 Corinthians 3:13 Every man's work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man's work of what sort it is.

as:

1 Peter 5:9 Whom resist stedfast in the faith, knowing that the same afflictions are accomplished in your brethren that are in the world.
1 Corinthians 10:13 There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God [is] faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear [it].
1 Thessalonians 3:2-4 And sent Timotheus, our brother, and minister of God, and our fellowlabourer in the gospel of Christ, to establish you, and to comfort you concerning your faith: ... For verily, when we were with you, we told you before that we should suffer tribulation; even as it came to pass, and ye know.
2 Timothy 3:12 Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.
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Is 28:21. Dn 11:35. 1Co 3:13; 10:13. 1Th 3:2. 2Ti 3:12. 1P 1:7; 4:4; 5:9.

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