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1 Peter 3:8 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Finally, [be] ye all likeminded, compassionate, loving as brethren, tenderhearted, humbleminded:
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Finally, [be ye] all of one mind, having compassion one of another, love as brethren, [be] pitiful, [be] courteous:
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— To sum up, all of you be harmonious, sympathetic, brotherly, kindhearted, and humble in spirit;
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Finally, [be ye] all of one mind, having compassion one of another; love as brethren, [be] pitiful, [be] courteous:
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Finally, [be] all of one mind, sympathising, full of brotherly love, tender hearted, humble minded;
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And, finally, all, being of one mind, having fellow—feeling, attached to the brethren, of tender affection, of lowly mind:
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And finally, being all of one mind, having fellow-feeling, loving as brethren, compassionate, courteous,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And in fine, be ye all of one mind, having compassion one of another, being lovers of the brotherhood, merciful, modest, humble:
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Finally [be ye] all of one minde, hauing compassion one of another, loue as brethren, be pitifull, be courteous,
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— But, finally be all unanimous, and suffer with those who suffer, and love one another, and be merciful and gentle;
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— The summing up, is, that ye all be in harmony, that ye be sympathetic with them who suffer, and affectionate one to another, and be merciful and kind.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Finally, 5056
{5056} Prime
τέλος
telos
{tel'-os}
From a primary word τέλλω [[tello]] (to set out for a definite point or goal); properly the point aimed at as a limit, that is, (by implication) the conclusion of an act or state (termination [literally, figuratively or indefinitely], result [immediate, ultimate or prophetic], purpose); specifically an impost or levy (as paid).
y1161
[1161] Standard
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
[be ye] all 3956
{3956} Prime
πᾶς
pas
{pas}
Including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole.
of one mind, 3675
{3675} Prime
ὁμόφρων
homophron
{hom-of'-rone}
From the base of G3674 and G5424; like minded, that is, harmonious.
having compassion one of another, 4835
{4835} Prime
συμπαθής
sumpathes
{soom-path-ace'}
From G4841; having a fellow feeling ('sympathetic'), that is, (by implication) mutually commiserative.
love as brethren, 5361
{5361} Prime
φιλάδελφος
philadelphos
{fil-ad'-el-fos}
From G5384 and G0080; fond of brethren, that is, fraternal.
[be] pitiful, 2155
{2155} Prime
εὔσπλαγχνος
eusplagchnos
{yoo'-splangkh-nos}
From G2095 and G4698; well compassioned, that is, sympathetic.
[be] courteous: 5391
{5391} Prime
φιλόφρων
philophron
{fil-of'-rone}
From G5384 and G5424; friendly of mind, that is, kind.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

1 Peter 3:8

_ _ General summary of relative duty, after having detailed particular duties from 1 Peter 2:18.

_ _ of one mind — as to the faith.

_ _ having compassion one of anotherGreek, “sympathizing” in the joy and sorrow of others.

_ _ love as brethrenGreek, “loving the brethren.”

_ _ pitiful — towards the afflicted.

_ _ courteous — genuine Christian politeness; not the tinsel of the world’s politeness; stamped with unfeigned love on one side, and humility on the other. But the oldest manuscripts read, “humble-minded.” It is slightly different from “humble,” in that it marks a conscious effort to be truly humble.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

1 Peter 3:8-15

_ _ The apostle here passes from special to more general exhortations.

_ _ I. He teaches us how Christians and friends should treat one another. He advises Christians to be all of one mind, to be unanimous in the belief of the same faith, and the practice of the same duties of religion; and, whereas the Christians at that time were many of them in a suffering condition, he charges them to have compassion one of another, to love as brethren, to pity those who were in distress, and to be courteous to all. Hence learn, 1. Christians should endeavour to be all of one mind in the great points of faith, in real affection, and in Christian practice; they should be like-minded one to another, according to Christ Jesus (Romans 15:5), not according to man's pleasure, but God's word. 2. Though Christians cannot be exactly of the same mind, yet they should have compassion one for another, and love as brethren; they ought not to persecute or hate one another, but love one another with more than common affection; they should love as brethren. 3. Christianity requires pity to the distressed, and civility to all. He must be a flagrant sinner, or a vile apostate, who is not a proper object of civil courtesy, 1 Corinthians 5:11; 2 John 1:10-11.

_ _ II. He instructs us how to behave towards enemies. The apostle knew that Christians would be hated and evil-entreated of all men for Christ's sake; therefore,

_ _ 1. He warns them not to return evil for evil, nor railing for railing; but, on the contrary, “when they rail at you, do you bless them; when they give you evil words, do you give them good ones; for Christ has both by his word and example called you to bless those that curse you, and has settled a blessing on you as your everlasting inheritance, though you were unworthy.” To bear evils patiently, and to bless your enemies, is the way to obtain this blessing of God. Learn, (1.) To render evil for evil, or railing for railing, is a sinful unchristian practice; the magistrate may punish evil-doers, and private men may seek a legal remedy when they are wronged; but private revenge by duelling, scolding, or secret mischief, is forbidden Proverbs 20:22; Luke 6:27; Romans 12:17; 1 Thessalonians 5:15. To rail is to revile another in bitter, fierce, and reproachful terms; but for ministers to rebuke sharply, and to preach earnestly against the sins of the times, is not railing; all the prophets and apostles practised it, Isaiah 56:10; Zephaniah 3:3; Acts 20:29. (2.) The laws of Christ oblige us to return blessing for railing. Matthew 5:44, “Love your enemies, bless those that curse you, do good to those that hate you, and pray for those that persecute you. You must not justify them in their sin, but you must do for your enemies all that justice requires or charity commands.” We must pity, pray for, and love those who rail at us. (3.) A Christian's calling, as it invests him with glorious privileges, so it obliges him to difficult duties. (4.) All the true servants of God shall infallibly inherit a blessing; they have it already in a great degree, but the full possession of it is reserved to another state and world.

_ _ 2. He gives an excellent prescription for a comfortable happy life in this quarrelsome ill-natured world (1 Peter 3:10): it is quoted from Psalms 34:12-14. “If you earnestly desire that your life should be long, and your days peaceable and prosperous, keep your tongue from reviling, evil-speaking, and slandering, and your lips from lying, deceit, and dissimulation. Avoid doing any real damage or hurt to your neighbour, but be ever ready to do good, and to overcome evil with good; seek peace with all men, and pursue it, though it retire from you. This will be the best way to dispose people to speak well of you, and live peaceably with you.” Learn, (1.) Good people under the Old and new Testament were obliged to the same moral duties; to refrain the tongue from evil, and the lips from guile, was a duty in David's time as well as now. (2.) It is lawful to consider temporal advantages as motives and encouragements to religion. (3.) The practice of religion, particularly the right government of the tongue, is the best way to make this life comfortable and prosperous; a sincere, inoffensive, discreet tongue, is a singular means to pass us peaceably and comfortably through the world. (4.) The avoiding of evil, and doing of good, is the way to contentment and happiness both here and hereafter. (5.) It is the duty of Christians not only to embrace peace when it is offered, but to seek and pursue it when it is denied: peace with societies, as well as peace with particular persons, in opposition to division and contention, is what is here intended.

_ _ 3. He shows that Christians need not fear that such patient inoffensive behaviour as is prescribed will invite and encourage the cruelty of their enemies, for God will thereby be engaged on their side: For the eyes of the Lord are over the righteous (1 Peter 3:12); he takes special notice of them, exercises a providential constant government over them, and bears a special respect and affection to them. His ears are open to their prayers; so that if any injuries be offered to them they have this remedy, they may complain of it to their heavenly Father, whose ears are always attentive to the prayers of his servants in their distresses, and who will certainly aid them against their unrighteous enemies. But the face of the Lord is against those that do evil; his anger, and displeasure, and revenge, will pursue them; for he is more an enemy to wicked persecutors than men are. Observe, (1.) We must not in all cases adhere to the express words of scripture, but study the sense and meaning of them, otherwise we shall be led into blasphemous errors and absurdities: we must not imagine that God hath eyes, and ears, and face, though these are the express words of the scripture. (2.) God hath a special care and paternal affection towards all his righteous people. (3.) God doth always hear the prayers of the faithful, John 4:31; 1 John 5:14; Hebrews 4:16. (4.) Though God is infinitely good, yet he abhors impenitent sinners, and will pour out his wrath upon those that do evil. He will do himself right, and do all the world justice; and his goodness is no obstruction to his doing so.

_ _ 4. This patient humble behaviour of Christians is further recommended and urged from two considerations: — (1.) This will be the best and surest way to prevent suffering; for who is he that will harm you? 1 Peter 3:13. This, I suppose, is spoken of Christians in an ordinary condition, not in the heat of persecution. “Ordinarily, there will be but few so diabolical and impious as to harm those who live so innocently and usefully as you do.”(2.) This is the way to improve sufferings. “If you be followers of that which is good, and yet suffer, this is suffering for righteousness; sake (1 Peter 3:14), and will be your glory and your happiness, as it entitles you to the blessing promised by Christ” (Matthew 5:10); therefore, [1.] “You need not be afraid of any thing they can do to strike you with terror, neither be much troubled nor concerned about the rage or force of your enemies.” Learn, First, to follow always that which is good is the best course we can take to keep out of harm's way. Secondly, To suffer for righteousness sake is the honour and happiness of a Christian; to suffer for the cause of truth, a good conscience, or any part of a Christian's duty, is a great honour; the delight of it is greater than the torment, the honour more than the disgrace, and the gain much greater than the loss. Thirdly, Christians have no reason to be afraid of the threats or rage of any of their enemies. “Your enemies are God's enemies, his face is against them, his power is above them, they are the objects of his curse, and can do nothing to you but by his permission; therefore trouble not yourselves about them.” [2.] Instead of terrifying yourselves with the fear of men, be sure to sanctify the Lord God in your hearts (1 Peter 3:15); let him be your fear, and let him be your dread, Isaiah 8:12, Isaiah 8:13. Fear not those that can only kill the body, but fear him that can destroy body and soul, Luke 12:4, Luke 12:5. We sanctify the Lord God in our hearts when we with sincerity and fervency adore him, when our thoughts of him are awful and reverend, when we rely upon his power, trust to his faithfulness, submit to his wisdom, imitate his holiness, and give him the glory due to his most illustrious perfections. We sanctify God before others when our deportment is such as invites and encourages others to glorify and honour him; both are required, Leviticus 10:3. “When this principle is laid deeply into your hearts, the next thing, as to men, is to be always ready, that is, able and willing, to give an answer, or make an apology or defence, of the faith you profess, and that to every man that asketh a reason of your hope, what sort of hope you have, or which you suffer such hardships in the world.” Learn, First, An awful sense of the divine perfections is the best antidote against the fear of sufferings; did we fear God more, we should certainly fear men less. Secondly, The hope and faith of a Christian are defensible against all the world. There may be a good reason given for religion; it is not a fancy but a rational scheme revealed from heaven, suited to all the necessities of miserable sinners, and centering entirely in the glory of God through Jesus Christ. Thirdly, Every Christian is bound to answer and apologize for the hope that is in him. Christians should have a reason ready for their Christianity, that it may appear they are not actuated either by folly or fancy. This defence may be necessary more than once or twice, so that Christians should be always prepared to make it, either to the magistrate, if he demand it, or to any inquisitive Christian, who desires to know it for his information or improvement. Fourthly, These confessions of our faith ought to be made with meekness and fear; apologies for our religion ought to be made with modesty and meekness, in the fear of God, with jealousy over ourselves, and reverence to our superiors.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

1 Peter 3:8

Finally — This part of the epistle reaches to 1 Peter 4:11. The apostle seems to have added the rest afterwards. Sympathizing — Rejoicing and sorrowing together. Love all believers as brethren. Be pitiful — Toward the afflicted. Be courteous — To all men. Courtesy is such a behaviour toward equals and inferiors as shows respect mixed with love.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

1 Peter 3:8

(10) Finally, [be ye] all of one mind, having compassion one of another, love as brethren, [be] pitiful, [be] courteous:

(10) He turns to common exhortations, and commends harmony and whatever things pertain to the maintenance of peace and mutual love.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
be:

Acts 2:1 And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they were all with one accord in one place.
Acts 4:32 And the multitude of them that believed were of one heart and of one soul: neither said any [of them] that ought of the things which he possessed was his own; but they had all things common.
Romans 12:16 [Be] of the same mind one toward another. Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate. Be not wise in your own conceits.
Romans 15:5 Now the God of patience and consolation grant you to be likeminded one toward another according to Christ Jesus:
1 Corinthians 1:10 Now I beseech you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that ye all speak the same thing, and [that] there be no divisions among you; but [that] ye be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgment.
Philippians 3:16 Nevertheless, whereto we have already attained, let us walk by the same rule, let us mind the same thing.

having:

Zechariah 7:9 Thus speaketh the LORD of hosts, saying, Execute true judgment, and shew mercy and compassions every man to his brother:
Matthew 18:33 Shouldest not thou also have had compassion on thy fellowservant, even as I had pity on thee?
Luke 10:33 But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion [on him],
Romans 12:15 Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them that weep.
1 Corinthians 12:26 And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.
James 2:13 For he shall have judgment without mercy, that hath shewed no mercy; and mercy rejoiceth against judgment.
James 3:17 But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, [and] easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.

love as brethren:
or, loving to the brethren,
1 Peter 1:22 Seeing ye have purified your souls in obeying the truth through the Spirit unto unfeigned love of the brethren, [see that ye] love one another with a pure heart fervently:
1 Peter 2:17 Honour all [men]. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honour the king.
Romans 12:10 [Be] kindly affectioned one to another with brotherly love; in honour preferring one another;
Hebrews 13:1 Let brotherly love continue.
2 Peter 1:7 And to godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness charity.
1 John 3:14 We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not [his] brother abideth in death.
1 John 3:18-19 My little children, let us not love in word, neither in tongue; but in deed and in truth. ... And hereby we know that we are of the truth, and shall assure our hearts before him.

pitiful:

Psalms 103:13 Like as a father pitieth [his] children, [so] the LORD pitieth them that fear him.
Proverbs 28:8 He that by usury and unjust gain increaseth his substance, he shall gather it for him that will pity the poor.
Matthew 18:33 Shouldest not thou also have had compassion on thy fellowservant, even as I had pity on thee?
James 5:11 Behold, we count them happy which endure. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy.

courteous:

Acts 27:3 And the next [day] we touched at Sidon. And Julius courteously entreated Paul, and gave [him] liberty to go unto his friends to refresh himself.
Acts 28:7 In the same quarters were possessions of the chief man of the island, whose name was Publius; who received us, and lodged us three days courteously.
Ephesians 4:31-32 Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice: ... And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ's sake hath forgiven you.
Ephesians 5:1-2 Be ye therefore followers of God, as dear children; ... And walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweetsmelling savour.
Philippians 4:8-9 Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things [are] honest, whatsoever things [are] just, whatsoever things [are] pure, whatsoever things [are] lovely, whatsoever things [are] of good report; if [there be] any virtue, and if [there be] any praise, think on these things. ... Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you.
Colossians 3:12 Put on therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of mercies, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, longsuffering;
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Ps 103:13. Pv 28:8. Zc 7:9. Mt 18:33. Lk 10:33. Ac 2:1; 4:32; 27:3; 28:7. Ro 12:10, 15, 16; 15:5. 1Co 1:10; 12:26. Ep 4:31; 5:1. Php 3:16; 4:8. Col 3:12. He 13:1. Jm 2:13; 3:17; 5:11. 1P 1:22; 2:17. 2P 1:7. 1Jn 3:14, 18.

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