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1 John 2:7 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Beloved, no new commandment write I unto you, but an old commandment which ye had from the beginning: the old commandment is the word which ye heard.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Brethren, I write no new commandment unto you, but an old commandment which ye had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word which ye have heard from the beginning.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Beloved, I am not writing a new commandment to you, but an old commandment which you have had from the beginning; the old commandment is the word which you have heard.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Brethren, I write no new commandment to you, but an old commandment which ye had from the beginning: The old commandment is the word which ye have heard from the beginning.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Beloved, I write no new commandment to you, but an old commandment, which ye have had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word which ye heard.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Beloved! no new commandment, am I writing unto you; but an old commandment, which ye have been holding from the beginning: The old commandment is the word which ye have heard.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— Brethren, a new command I write not to you, but an old command, that ye had from the beginning—the old command is the word that ye heard from the beginning;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Dearly beloved, I write not a new commandment to you, but an old commandment which you had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word which you have heard.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Brethren, I write no new commandement vnto you, but an olde commandement which ye had from the beginning: the old commandement is the word which ye haue heard from the beginning.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— MY beloved, a new commandment I write not to you, but the old commandment, that which was with you from the beginning; but the old commandment is the word which you have heard.
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— My beloved, I write no new commandment to you, but the old commandment which ye had from the beginning; and the old commandment is the word, which ye have heard.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Brethren, 80
{0080} Prime
ἀδελφός
adelphos
{ad-el-fos'}
From G0001 (as a connective particle) and δελφύς [[delphus]] (the womb); a brother (literally or figuratively) near or remote (much like [H0001]).
I write 1125
{1125} Prime
γράφω
grapho
{graf'-o}
A primary verb; to 'grave', especially to write; figuratively to describe.
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
no 3756
{3756} Prime
οὐ
ou
{oo}
A primary word; the absolutely negative (compare G3361) adverb; no or not.
new 2537
{2537} Prime
καινός
kainos
{kahee-nos'}
Of uncertain affinity; new (especially in freshness; while G3501 is properly so with respect to age).
commandment 1785
{1785} Prime
ἐντολή
entole
{en-tol-ay'}
From G1781; injunction, that is, an authoritative prescription.
unto you, 5213
{5213} Prime
ὑμῖν
humin
{hoo-min'}
Irregular dative case of G5210; to (with or by) you.
but 235
{0235} Prime
ἀλλά
alla
{al-lah'}
Neuter plural of G0243; properly other things, that is, (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations).
an old 3820
{3820} Prime
παλαιός
palaios
{pal-ah-yos'}
From G3819; antique, that is, not recent, worn out.
commandment 1785
{1785} Prime
ἐντολή
entole
{en-tol-ay'}
From G1781; injunction, that is, an authoritative prescription.
which 3739
{3739} Prime
ὅς
hos
{hos}
Probably a primary word (or perhaps a form of the article G3588); the relative (sometimes demonstrative) pronoun, who, which, what, that.
ye had 2192
{2192} Prime
ἔχω
echo
{ekh'-o}
A primary verb (including an alternate form σχέω [[scheo]], {skheh'-o}; used in certain tenses only); to hold (used in very various applications, literally or figuratively, direct or remote; such as possession, ability, contiguity, relation or condition).
z5707
<5707> Grammar
Tense - Imperfect (See G5775)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 855
from 575
{0575} Prime
ἀπό
apo
{ap-o'}
A primary particle; 'off', that is, away (from something near), in various senses (of place, time, or relation; literally or figuratively).
the beginning. 746
{0746} Prime
ἀρχή
arche
{ar-khay'}
From G0756; (properly abstract) a commencement, or (concrete) chief (in various applications of order, time, place or rank).
The x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
old 3820
{3820} Prime
παλαιός
palaios
{pal-ah-yos'}
From G3819; antique, that is, not recent, worn out.
commandment 1785
{1785} Prime
ἐντολή
entole
{en-tol-ay'}
From G1781; injunction, that is, an authoritative prescription.
is 2076
{2076} Prime
ἐστί
esti
{es-tee'}
Third person singular present indicative of G1510; he (she or it) is; also (with neuter plural) they are.
z5748
<5748> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 1612
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
word 3056
{3056} Prime
λόγος
logos
{log'-os}
From G3004; something said (including the thought); by implication a topic (subject of discourse), also reasoning (the mental faculty) or motive; by extension a computation; specifically (with the article in John) the Divine Expression (that is, Christ).
which 3739
{3739} Prime
ὅς
hos
{hos}
Probably a primary word (or perhaps a form of the article G3588); the relative (sometimes demonstrative) pronoun, who, which, what, that.
ye have heard 191
{0191} Prime
ἀκούω
akouo
{ak-oo'-o}
A primary verb; to hear (in various senses).
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
from 575
{0575} Prime
ἀπό
apo
{ap-o'}
A primary particle; 'off', that is, away (from something near), in various senses (of place, time, or relation; literally or figuratively).
the beginning. 746
{0746} Prime
ἀρχή
arche
{ar-khay'}
From G0756; (properly abstract) a commencement, or (concrete) chief (in various applications of order, time, place or rank).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

1 John 2:7

_ _ Brethren — The oldest manuscripts and versions read instead, “Beloved,” appropriate to the subject here, love.

_ _ no new commandment — namely, love, the main principle of walking as Christ walked (1 John 2:6), and that commandment, of which one exemplification is presently given, 1 John 2:9, 1 John 2:10, the love of brethren.

_ _ ye had from the beginning — from the time that ye first heard the Gospel word preached.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

1 John 2:7-11

_ _ The seventh verse may be supposed either to look backward to what immediately preceded (and then it is walking as Christ walked that is here represented as no new, but an old commandment; it is that which the apostles would certainly inculcate wherever they brought Christ's gospel), or to look forward to what the apostle is now going to recommend, and that is the law of fraternal love; this is the message heard from the beginning (1 John 3:11), and the old commandment, 2 John 1:5. Now, while the apostle addresses himself to the recommendation of such a practice, he is ready to give an instance thereof in his affectionate appellation: “Brethren, you who are dear to me in the bond of that love to which I would solicit you;” and so the precept of fraternal love is recommended,

_ _ I. As an old one: I write no new commandment unto you, but an old commandment, which you had from the beginning, 1 John 2:7. The precept of love must be as old as human nature; but it might admit divers enactions, enforcements, and motives. In the state of innocence, had human nature then been propagated, men must have loved one another as being of one blood, made to dwell on the earth, as being God's offspring, and bearing his image. In the state of sin and promised recovery, they must love one another as related to God their Maker, as related to each other by blood, and as partners in the same hope. When the Hebrews were peculiarly incorporated, they must accordingly love each other, as being the privileged people, whose were the covenants and the adoption, and of whose race the Messiah and head of the church must spring; and the law of love must be conveyed with new obligations to the new Israel of God, to the gospel church, and so it is the old commandment, or the word which the children of the gospel Israel have heard from the beginning, 1 John 2:7.

_ _ II. As a new one: “Again, to constrain you to this duty the more, a new commandment I write unto you, the law of the new society, the Christian corporation, which thing is true in him, the matter of which was first true in and concerning the head of it; the truth of it was first and was abundantly in him; he loved the church, and gave himself for it: and it is true in you; this law is in some measure written upon your hearts; you are taught of God to love one another, and that because” (or since, or forasmuch as) “the darkness is past, the darkness of your prejudiced unconverted (whether Jewish or Gentile) minds, your deplorable ignorance of God and of Christ is now past, and the true light now shineth (1 John 2:8); the light of evangelical revelation hath shone with life and efficacy into your hearts; hence you have seen the excellency of Christian love, and the fundamental obligation thereto.” Hence we see that the fundamentals (and particularly the fundamental precepts) of the Christian religion may be represented either as new or old; the reformed doctrine, or doctrine of religion in the reformed churches, is new and old — new, as taught after long darkness, by the lights of the reformation, new as purged from the adulterations of Rome; but old as having been taught and heard from the beginning. We should see that that grace or virtue which was true in Christ be true also in us; we should be conformable to our head. The more our darkness is past, and gospel light shines unto us, the deeper should our subjection be to the commandments of our Lord, whether considered as old or new. Light should produce a suitable heat. Accordingly, here is another trial of our Christian light; before, it was to be approved by obedience to God; here by Christian love. 1. He who wants such love in vain pretends his light: He that saith he is in the light, and hateth his brother, is in darkness even unto now, 1 John 2:9. It is proper for sincere Christians to acknowledge what God has done for their souls; but in the visible church there are often those who assume to themselves more than is true, there are those who say they are in the light, the divine revelation has made its impression upon their minds and spirits, and yet they walk in hatred and enmity towards their Christian brethren; these cannot be swayed by the sense of the love of Christ to their brethren, and therefore remain in their dark state, notwithstanding their pretended conversion to the Christian religion. 2. He who is governed by such love approves his light to be good and genuine: He that loveth his brother (as his brother in Christ) abideth in the light, 1 John 2:10. He sees the foundation and reason of Christian love; he discerns the weight and value of the Christian redemption; he sees how meet it is that we should love those whom Christ hath loved; and then the consequence will be that there is no occasion of stumbling in him (1 John 2:10); he will be no scandal, no stumbling-block, to his brother; he will conscientiously beware that he neither induce his brother to sin nor turn him out of the way of religion, Christian love teaches us highly to value our brother's soul, and to dread every thing that will be injurious to his innocence and peace. 3. Hatred is a sign of spiritual darkness: But he that hateth his brother is in darkness, 1 John 2:11. Spiritual light is instilled by the Spirit of grace, and one of the first-fruits of that Spirit is love; he then who is possessed with malignity towards a Christian brother must needs be destitute of spiritual light; consequently he walks in darkness (1 John 2:11); his life is agreeable to a dark mind and conscience, and he knows not whither he goes; he sees not whither this dark spirit carries him, and particularly that it will carry him to the world of utter darkness, because darkness hath blinded his eyes, 1 John 2:11. The darkness of regeneracy, evidenced by a malignant spirit, is contrary to the light of life; where that darkness dwells, the mind, the judgment, and the conscience will be darkened, and so will mistake the way to heavenly endless life. Here we may observe how effectually our apostle is now cured of his once hot and flaming spirit. Time was when he was for calling for fire from heaven upon poor ignorant Samaritans who received them not, Luke 9:54. But his Lord had shown him that he knew not his own spirit, nor whither it led him. Having now imbibed more of the Spirit of Christ, he breathes out good-will to man, and love to all the brethren. It is the Lord Jesus that is the great Master of love: it is his school (his own church) that is the school of love. His disciples are the disciples of love, and his family must be the family of love.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

1 John 2:7

When I speak of keeping his word, I write not a new commandment — I do not speak of any new one. But the old commandment, which ye had — Even from your forefathers.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

1 John 2:7

(6) Brethren, I write no new commandment unto you, but an old commandment which ye had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word which ye have heard from the beginning.

(6) The apostle expounding the commandment of charity towards one another, tells first that when he urges holiness, he brings no new idea of life (as they use to do who devise traditions one after another) but reminds them of that same law which God gave in the beginning, that is, by Moses, at the time that God began to make laws for his people.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
I write:

1 John 3:11 For this is the message that ye heard from the beginning, that we should love one another.
Acts 17:19 And they took him, and brought him unto Areopagus, saying, May we know what this new doctrine, whereof thou speakest, [is]?
2 John 1:5 And now I beseech thee, lady, not as though I wrote a new commandment unto thee, but that which we had from the beginning, that we love one another.

but:

Leviticus 19:18 Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I [am] the LORD.
Leviticus 19:34 [But] the stranger that dwelleth with you shall be unto you as one born among you, and thou shalt love him as thyself; for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt: I [am] the LORD your God.
Deuteronomy 6:5 And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might.
Matthew 5:43 Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy.
Matthew 22:37-40 Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. ... On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.
Mark 12:29-34 And Jesus answered him, The first of all the commandments [is], Hear, O Israel; The Lord our God is one Lord: ... And when Jesus saw that he answered discreetly, he said unto him, Thou art not far from the kingdom of God. And no man after that durst ask him [any question].
Romans 13:8-10 Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law. ... Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love [is] the fulfilling of the law.
Galatians 5:13-14 For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only [use] not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another. ... For all the law is fulfilled in one word, [even] in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
James 2:8-12 If ye fulfil the royal law according to the scripture, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself, ye do well: ... So speak ye, and so do, as they that shall be judged by the law of liberty.
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Chain-Reference Bible Search

Lv 19:18, 34. Dt 6:5. Mt 5:43; 22:37. Mk 12:29. Ac 17:19. Ro 13:8. Ga 5:13. Jm 2:8. 1Jn 3:11. 2Jn 1:5.

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