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1 Corinthians 7:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Now concerning the things whereof ye wrote: It is good for a man not to touch a woman.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Now concerning the things whereof ye wrote unto me: [It is] good for a man not to touch a woman.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Now concerning the things about which you wrote, it is good for a man not to touch a woman.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Now concerning the things of which ye wrote to me: [It is] good for a man not to touch a woman.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— But concerning the things of which ye have written [to me]: [It is] good for a man not to touch a woman;
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Now, concerning the things whereof ye wrote, it were, good, for a man, not to touch, a woman;
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And concerning the things of which ye wrote to me: good [it is] for a man not to touch a woman,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Now concerning the things whereof you wrote to me: It is good for a man not to touch a woman.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Now cocerning the things wherof ye wrote vnto me, It is good for a man not to touch a woman.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— BUT concerning those (questions) of which you wrote to me, It is well for a man unto a woman not to come nigh;
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And concerning the things of which ye wrote to me, it is praiseworthy for a man not to approach a woman.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Now 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
concerning 4012
{4012} Prime
περί
peri
{per-ee'}
From the base of G4008; properly through (all over), that is, around; figuratively with respect to; used in various applications, of place, cause or time (with the genitive case denoting the subject or occasion or superlative point; with the accusative case the locality, circuit, matter, circumstance or general period).
the things whereof 3739
{3739} Prime
ὅς
hos
{hos}
Probably a primary word (or perhaps a form of the article G3588); the relative (sometimes demonstrative) pronoun, who, which, what, that.
ye wrote 1125
{1125} Prime
γράφω
grapho
{graf'-o}
A primary verb; to 'grave', especially to write; figuratively to describe.
z5656
<5656> Grammar
Tense - Aorist (See G5777)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 2319
unto me: 3427
{3427} Prime
μοί
moi
{moy}
The simpler form of G1698; to me.
[It is] good 2570
{2570} Prime
καλός
kalos
{kal-os'}
Of uncertain affinity; properly beautiful, but chiefly (figuratively) good (literally or morally), that is, valuable or virtuous (for appearance or use, and thus distinguished from G0018, which is properly intrinsic).
for a man 444
{0444} Prime
ἄνθρωπος
anthropos
{anth'-ro-pos}
From G0435 and ὤψ [[ops]] (the countenance; from G3700); manfaced, that is, a human being.
not 3361
{3361} Prime
μή
me
{may}
A primary particle of qualified negation (whereas G3756 expresses an absolute denial); (adverbially) not, (conjugationally) lest; also (as interrogitive implying a negative answer [whereas G3756 expects an affirmative one]); whether.
to touch 680
{0680} Prime
ἅπτομαι
haptomai
{hap'-tom-ahee}
Reflexive of G0681; properly to attach oneself to, that is, to touch (in many implied relations).
z5733
<5733> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle (See G5785)
Mood - Infinitive (See G5795)
Count - 30
a woman. 1135
{1135} Prime
γυνή
gune
{goo-nay'}
Probably from the base of G1096; a woman; specifically a wife.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

1 Corinthians 7:1

_ _ 1 Corinthians 7:1-40. Reply to their inquiries as to marriage; the general principle in other things is, abide in your station, for the time is short.

_ _ The Corinthians in their letter had probably asked questions which tended to disparage marriage, and had implied that it was better to break it off when contracted with an unbeliever.

_ _ good — that is, “expedient,” because of “the present distress”; that is, the unsettled state of the world, and the likelihood of persecutions tearing rudely asunder those bound by marriage ties. Hebrews 13:4, in opposition to ascetic and Romish notions of superior sanctity in celibacy, declares, “Marriage is HONORABLE IN ALL.” Another reason why in some cases celibacy may be a matter of Christian expediency is stated in 1 Corinthians 7:34, 1 Corinthians 7:35, “that ye may attend upon the Lord without distraction.” But these are exceptional cases, and in exceptional times, such as those of Paul.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

1 Corinthians 7:1-9

_ _ The apostle comes now, as a faithful and skilful casuist, to answer some cases of conscience which the Corinthians had proposed to him. Those were things whereof they wrote to him, 1 Corinthians 7:1. As the lips of ministers should keep knowledge, so the people should ask the law at their mouths. The apostle was as ready to resolve as they were to propose their doubts. In the former chapter, he warns them to avoid fornication; here he gives some directions about marriage, the remedy God had appointed for it. He tells them in general,

_ _ I. That it was good, in that juncture of time at least, to abstain from marriage altogether: It is good for a man not to touch a woman (not to take her to wife), by good here not understanding what is so conformable to the mind and will of God as if to do otherwise were sin, an extreme into which many of the ancients have run in favour of celibacy and virginity. Should the apostle be understood in this sense, he would contradict much of the rest of his discourse. But it is good, that is, either abstracting from circumstances there are many things in which the state of celibacy has the advantage above the marriage state; or else at this juncture, by reason of the distress of the Christian church, it would be a convenience for Christians to keep themselves single, provided they have the gift of continency, and at the same time can keep themselves chaste. The expression also may carry in it an intimation that Christians must avoid all occasions of this sin, and flee all fleshly lusts, and incentives to them; must neither look on nor touch a woman, so as to provoke lustful inclinations. Yet,

_ _ II. He informs them that marriage, and the comforts and satisfactions of that state, are by divine wisdom prescribed for preventing fornication (1 Corinthians 7:2), PorneiasFornications, all sorts of lawless lust. To avoid these, Let every man, says he, have his own wife, and every woman her own husband; that is, marry, and confine themselves to their own mates. And, when they are married, let each render the other due benevolence (1 Corinthians 7:3), consider the disposition and exigency of each other, and render conjugal duty, which is owing to each other. For, as the apostle argues (1 Corinthians 7:4), in the married state neither person has power over his own body, but has delivered it into the power of the other, the wife hers into the power of the husband, the husband his into the power of the wife. Note, Polygamy, or the marriage of more persons than one, as well as adultery, must be a breach of marriage-covenants, and a violation of the partner's rights. And therefore they should not defraud one another of the use of their bodies, nor any other of the comforts of the conjugal state, appointed of God for keeping the vessel in sanctification and honour, and preventing the lusts of uncleanness, except it be with mutual consent (1 Corinthians 7:5) and for a time only, while they employ themselves in some extraordinary duties of religion, or give themselves to fasting and prayer. Note, Seasons of deep humiliation require abstinence from lawful pleasures. But this separation between husband and wife must not be for a continuance, lest they expose themselves to Satan's temptations, by reason of their incontinence, or inability to contain. Note, Persons expose themselves to great danger by attempting to perform what is above their strength, and at the same time not bound upon them by any law of God. If they abstain from lawful enjoyments, they may be ensnared into unlawful ones. The remedies God hath provided against sinful inclinations are certainly best.

_ _ III. The apostle limits what he had said about every man's having his own wife, etc. (1 Corinthians 7:2): I speak this by permission, not of command. He did not lay it as an injunction upon every man to marry without exception. Any man might marry. No law of God prohibited the thing. But, on the other hand, not law bound a man to marry so that he sinned if he did not; I mean, unless his circumstances required it for preventing the lust of uncleanness. It was a thing in which men, by the laws of God, were in a great measure left at liberty. And therefore Paul did not bind every man to marry, though every man had an allowance. No, he could wish all men were as himself (1 Corinthians 7:7), that is, single, and capable of living continently in that state. There were several conveniences in it, which at that season, if not at others, made it more eligible in itself. Note, It is a mark of true goodness to wish all men as happy as ourselves. But it did not answer the intentions of divine Providence as well for all men to have as much command of this appetite as Paul had. It was a gift vouchsafed to such persons as Infinite Wisdom thought proper: Every one hath his proper gift of God, one after this manner and another after that. Natural constitutions vary; and, where there may not be much difference in the constitution, different degrees of grace are vouchsafed, which may give some a greater victory over natural inclination than others. Note, The gifts of God, both in nature and grace, are variously distributed. Some have them after this manner and some after that. Paul could wish all men were as himself, but all men cannot receive such a saying, save those to whom it is given, Matthew 19:11.

_ _ IV. He sums up his sense on this head (1 Corinthians 7:9, 1 Corinthians 7:10): I say therefore to the unmarried and widows, to those in a state of virginity or widowhood, It is good for them if they abide even as I. There are many conveniences, and especially at this juncture, in a single state, to render it preferable to a married one. It is convenient therefore that the unmarried abide as I, which plainly implies that Paul was at that time unmarried. But, if they cannot contain, let them marry; for it is better to marry than to burn. This is God's remedy for lust. The fire may be quenched by the means he has appointed. And marriage, with all its inconveniences, is much better than to burn with impure and lustful desires. Marriage is honourable in all; but it is a duty in those who cannot contain nor conquer those inclinations.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

1 Corinthians 7:1

It is good for a man — Who is master of himself. Not to touch a women — That is, not to marry. So great and many are the advantages of a single life.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

1 Corinthians 7:1

Now (1) concerning the things (a) whereof ye wrote unto me: [It is] (b) good for a man not to touch a woman.

(1) He teaches concerning marriage that although a single life has its advantages, which he will declare afterwards, yet that marriage is necessary for the avoiding of fornication. But so that neither one man may have many wives, nor any wife many husbands.

(a) Concerning those matters about which you wrote to me.

(b) Commodious, and (as we say) expedient. For marriage brings many griefs with it, and that by reason of the corruption of our first estate.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
good:

1 Corinthians 7:8 I say therefore to the unmarried and widows, It is good for them if they abide even as I.
1 Corinthians 7:26-27 I suppose therefore that this is good for the present distress, [I say], that [it is] good for a man so to be. ... Art thou bound unto a wife? seek not to be loosed. Art thou loosed from a wife? seek not a wife.
1 Corinthians 7:37-38 Nevertheless he that standeth stedfast in his heart, having no necessity, but hath power over his own will, and hath so decreed in his heart that he will keep his virgin, doeth well. ... So then he that giveth [her] in marriage doeth well; but he that giveth [her] not in marriage doeth better.
Matthew 19:10-11 His disciples say unto him, If the case of the man be so with [his] wife, it is not good to marry. ... But he said unto them, All [men] cannot receive this saying, save [they] to whom it is given.

touch:

Genesis 20:6 And God said unto him in a dream, Yea, I know that thou didst this in the integrity of thy heart; for I also withheld thee from sinning against me: therefore suffered I thee not to touch her.
Ruth 2:9 [Let] thine eyes [be] on the field that they do reap, and go thou after them: have I not charged the young men that they shall not touch thee? and when thou art athirst, go unto the vessels, and drink of [that] which the young men have drawn.
Proverbs 6:29 So he that goeth in to his neighbour's wife; whosoever toucheth her shall not be innocent.
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Gn 20:6. Ru 2:9. Pv 6:29. Mt 19:10. 1Co 7:8, 26, 37.

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