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1 Corinthians 16:10 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Now if Timothy come, see that he be with you without fear; for he worketh the work of the Lord, as I also do:
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Now if Timotheus come, see that he may be with you without fear: for he worketh the work of the Lord, as I also [do].
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Now if Timothy comes, see that he is with you without cause to be afraid, for he is doing the Lord’s work, as I also am.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Now if Timothy come, see that he may be with you without fear: for he worketh the work of the Lord, as I also [do].
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Now if Timotheus come, see that he may be with you without fear; for he works the work of the Lord, even as I.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— But, if Timothy should come, see that, without fear, he be with you, for, in the work of the Lord, doth he labour, even as, I:
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And if Timotheus may come, see that he may become without fear with you, for the work of the Lord he doth work, even as I,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Now if Timothy come, see that he be with you without fear: for he worketh the work of the Lord, as I also do.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Now if Timotheus come, see that he may be with you without feare: for hee worketh the worke of the Lord, as I also doe.
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— But if Timotheos come among you, see that he may be with you without fear; for he doeth the work of the Lord, as I [do].
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And if Timothy come to you, see that he may be without fear among you; for he doeth the work of the Lord, as I do.

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Now 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
if 1437
{1437} Prime
ἐάν
ean
{eh-an'}
From G1487 and G0302; a conditional particle; in case that, provided, etc.; often used in connection with other particles to denote indefiniteness or uncertainty.
Timotheus 5095
{5095} Prime
Τιμόθεος
Timotheos
{tee-moth'-eh-os}
From G5092 and G2316; dear to God; Timotheus, a Christian.
come, 2064
{2064} Prime
ἔρχομαι
erchomai
{er'-khom-ahee}
Middle voice of a primary verb (used only in the present and imperfect tenses, the others being supplied by a kindred [middle voice] word, ἐλεύθομαι [[eleuthomai]], {el-yoo'-thom-ahee}; or [active] ἔλθω [[eltho]], {el'-tho}; which do not otherwise occur); to come or go (in a great variety of applications, literally and figuratively).
z5632
<5632> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 449
see 991
{0991} Prime
βλέπω
blepo
{blep'-o}
A primary verb; to look at (literally or figuratively).
z5720
<5720> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Imperative (See G5794)
Count - 592
that 2443
{2443} Prime
ἵνα
hina
{hin'-ah}
Probably from the same as the former part of G1438 (through the demonstrative idea; compare G3588); in order that (denoting the purpose or the result).
he may be 1096
{1096} Prime
γίνομαι
ginomai
{ghin'-om-ahee}
A prolonged and middle form of a primary verb; to cause to be ('gen' -erate), that is, (reflexively) to become (come into being), used with great latitude (literally, figuratively, intensively, etc.).
z5638
<5638> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Middle Deponent (See G5788)
Mood - Subjunctive (See G5792)
Count - 66
with 4314
{4314} Prime
πρός
pros
{pros}
A strengthened form of G4253; a preposition of direction; forward to, that is, toward (with the genitive case the side of, that is, pertaining to; with the dative case by the side of, that is, near to; usually with the accusative case the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, that is, whither or for which it is predicated).
you 5209
{5209} Prime
ὑμᾶς
humas
{hoo-mas'}
Accusative of G5210; you (as the object of a verb or preposition).
without fear: 870
{0870} Prime
ἀφόβως
aphobos
{af-ob'-oce}
Adveb from a compound of G0001 (as a negative particle) and G5401; fearlessly.
for 1063
{1063} Prime
γάρ
gar
{gar}
A primary particle; properly assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles).
he worketh 2038
{2038} Prime
ἐργάζομαι
ergazomai
{er-gad'-zom-ahee}
Middle voice from G2041; to toil (as a task, occupation, etc.), (by implication) effect, be engaged in or with, etc.
z5736
<5736> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 618
the x3588
(3588) Complement

ho
{ho}
The masculine, feminine (second) and neuter (third) forms, in all their inflections; the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom).
work 2041
{2041} Prime
ἔργον
ergon
{er'-gon}
From ἔργω [[ergo]] (a primary but obsolete word; to work); toil (as an effort or occupation); by implication an act.
of the Lord, 2962
{2962} Prime
κύριος
kurios
{koo'-ree-os}
From κῦρος [[kuros]] (supremacy); supreme in authority, that is, (as noun) controller; by implication Mr. (as a respectful title).
as 5613
{5613} Prime
ὡς
hos
{hoce}
Probably adverb of comparative from G3739; which how, that is, in that manner (very variously used as shown).
I 1473
{1473} Prime
ἐγώ
ego
{eg-o'}
A primary pronoun of the first person, 'I' (only expressed when emphatic).
also 2532
{2532} Prime
καί
kai
{kahee}
Apparently a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; and, also, even, so, then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words.
[do].
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

1 Corinthians 16:10

_ _ Now — rather, “But.” Therefore Timothy was not the bearer of the Epistle; for it would not then be said, “IF Timothy come.” He must therefore have been sent by Paul from Ephesus before this Epistle was written, to accord with 1 Corinthians 4:17-19; and yet the passage here implies that Paul did not expect him to arrive at Corinth till after the letter was received. He tells them how to treat him “if” he should arrive. Acts 19:21, Acts 19:22 clears up the difficulty: Timothy, when sent from Ephesus, where this Epistle was written, did not proceed direct to Corinth, but went first to Macedonia; thus though sent before the letter, he might not reach Corinth till after it was received in that city. The undesigned coincidence between the Epistle and the history, and the clearing up of the meaning of the former (which does not mention the journey to Macedonia at all) by the latter, is a sure mark of genuineness [Paley, Horae Paulinae]. It is not certain that Timothy actually reached Corinth; for in Acts 19:22 only Macedonia is mentioned; but it does not follow that though Macedonia was the immediate object of his mission, Corinth was not the ultimate object. The “IF Timothy come,” implies uncertainty. 2 Corinthians 1:1 represents him with Paul in Macedonia; and 2 Corinthians 12:18, speaking of Titus and others sent to Corinth, does not mention Timothy, which it would have probably done, had one so closely connected with the apostle as Timothy was, stayed as his delegate at Corinth. The mission of Titus then took place, when it became uncertain whether Timothy could go forward from Macedonia to Corinth, Paul being anxious for immediate tidings of the state of the Corinthian Church. Alford argues that if so, Paul’s adversaries would have charged him with fickleness in this case also (2 Corinthians 1:17), as in the case of his own change of purpose. But Titus was sent directly to Corinth, so as to arrive there before Timothy could by the route through Macedonia. Titus’ presence would thus make amends for the disappointment as to the intended visit of Timothy and would disarm adversaries of a charge in this respect (2 Corinthians 7:6, 2 Corinthians 7:7).

_ _ without fear — Referring perhaps to a nervous timidity in Timothy’s character (1 Timothy 3:15; 1 Timothy 5:22, 1 Timothy 5:24). His youth would add to this feeling, as well as his country, Lystra, likely to be despised in refined Corinth.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

1 Corinthians 16:10-12

_ _ In this passage,

_ _ I. He recommends Timothy to them, in several particulars. As, 1. He bids them take care that he should be among them without feat, 1 Corinthians 16:10. Timothy was sent by the apostle to correct the abuses which had crept in among them; and not only to direct, but to blame, and censure, and reprove, those who were culpable. They were all in factions, and no doubt the mutual strife and hatred ran very high among them. There were some very rich, as it is probable; and many very proud, upon account both of their outward wealth and spiritual gifts. Proud spirits cannot easily bear reproof. It was reasonable therefore to think young Timothy might be roughly used; hence the apostle warns them against using him ill. Not but that he was prepared for the worst; but, whatever his firmness and prudence might be, it was their duty to behave themselves well towards him, and not discourage and dishearten him in his Lord's work. They should not fly out into resentment at his reproof. Note, Christians should bear faithful reproofs from their ministers, and not terrify and discourage them from doing their duty. 2. He warns them against despising him, 1 Corinthians 16:11. He was but a young man, and alone, as Ecumenius observes. He had no one to back him, and his own youthful face and years commanded but little reverence; and therefore the great pretenders to wisdom among them might be apt to entertain contemptuous thoughts of him. “Now,” says the apostle, “guard against this.” Not that he distrusted Timothy; he knew that Timothy would do nothing to bring contempt on his character, nothing to make his youth despicable. But pride was a reigning sin among the Corinthians, and such a caution was but too necessary. Note, Christians should be very careful not to pour contempt on any, but especially on ministers, the faithful ministers of Christ. These, whether young or old, are to be had in high esteem for their works sake. 3. He tells them they should give him all due encouragement, use him well while he was with them; and, as an evidence of this, they should send him away in friendship, and well prepared for his journey back again to Paul. This, as I have before observed, is the meaning of bringing him on his journey in peace, 1 Corinthians 16:11. Note, Faithful ministers are not only to be well received by a people among whom they may for a season minister, but are to be sent away with due respect.

_ _ II. He assigns the reasons why they should behave thus towards Timothy. 1. Because he was employed in the same work as Paul, and acted in it by the same authority, 1 Corinthians 16:10. He did not come on Paul's errand among them, nor to do his work, but the work of the Lord. Though he was not an apostle, he was assistant to one, and was sent upon this very business by a divine commission. And therefore to vex his spirit would be to grieve the Holy Spirit; to despise him would be to despise him that sent him, not Paul, but Paul's Lord and theirs. Note, Those who work the work of the Lord should be neither terrified nor despised, but treated with all tenderness and respect. Such are all the faithful ministers of the word, though not all in the same rank and degree. Pastors and teachers, as well as apostles and evangelists, while they are doing their duty, are to be treated with honour and respect. 2. Another reason is implied; as they were to esteem him for his work's sake, so also for Paul's sake, who had sent him to Corinth; not of his own errand indeed, but to work the work of the Lord: Conduct him forth in peace, that he may come to me, for I look for him with the brethren (1 Corinthians 16:11); or I with the brethren look for him (the original will bear either), ekdechomai gar auton meta tn adelphn — “I am expecting his return, and his report concerning you; and shall judge by your conduct towards him what your regard and respect for me will be. Look to it that you send him back with no evil report.” Paul might expect from the Corinthians, that a messenger from him, upon such an errand, should be regarded, and well treated. His services and success among them, his authority with them as an apostle, would challenge this at their hands. They would hardly dare to send back Timothy with a report that would grieve or provoke the apostle. “I and the brethren expect his return, wait for the report he is to make; and therefore do not use him ill, but respect him, regard his message, and let him return in peace.”

_ _ III. He informs them of Apollos's purpose to see them. 1. He himself had greatly desired him to come to them, 1 Corinthians 16:12. Though one party among them had declared for Apollos against Paul (if that passage is to be understood literally, vide 1 Corinthians 4:6), yet Paul did not hinder Apollos from going to Corinth in his own absence, nay, he pressed him to go thither. He had no suspicions of Apollos, as if he would lessen Paul's interest and respect among them, to the advancement of his own. Note, Faithful ministers are not apt to entertain jealousies of each other, nor suspect of such selfish designs. True charity and brotherly love think no evil. And where should these reign, if not in the breasts of the ministers of Christ? 2. Apollos could not be prevailed on for the present to come, but would at a more convenient season. Perhaps their feuds and factions might render the present season improper. He would not go to be set at the head of a party and countenance the dividing and contentious humour. When this had subsided, through Paul's epistle to them and Timothy's ministry among them, he might conclude a visit would be more proper. Apostles did not vie with each other, but consulted each other's comfort and usefulness. Paul intimates his great regard to the church of Corinth, when they had used him ill, by entreating Apollos to go to them; and Apollos shows his respect to Paul, and his concern to keep up his character and authority, by declining the journey till the Corinthians were in better temper. Note, It is very becoming the ministers of the gospel to have and manifest a concern for each other's reputation and usefulness.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

1 Corinthians 16:10

Without fear — Of any one's despising him for his youth. For he worketh the work of the Lord — The true ground of reverence to pastors. Those who do so, none ought to despise.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

1 Corinthians 16:10

Now if Timotheus come, see that he may be with you (e) without fear: for he worketh the work of the Lord, as I also [do].

(e) Without any just occasion of fear.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
if:

1 Corinthians 4:17 For this cause have I sent unto you Timotheus, who is my beloved son, and faithful in the Lord, who shall bring you into remembrance of my ways which be in Christ, as I teach every where in every church.
Acts 19:22 So he sent into Macedonia two of them that ministered unto him, Timotheus and Erastus; but he himself stayed in Asia for a season.

without:

1 Corinthians 16:11 Let no man therefore despise him: but conduct him forth in peace, that he may come unto me: for I look for him with the brethren.
1 Thessalonians 4:12 That ye may walk honestly toward them that are without, and [that] ye may have lack of nothing.

for:

1 Corinthians 15:58 Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.
Romans 16:21 Timotheus my workfellow, and Lucius, and Jason, and Sosipater, my kinsmen, salute you.
2 Corinthians 6:1 We then, [as] workers together [with him], beseech [you] also that ye receive not the grace of God in vain.
Philippians 2:19-22 But I trust in the Lord Jesus to send Timotheus shortly unto you, that I also may be of good comfort, when I know your state. ... But ye know the proof of him, that, as a son with the father, he hath served with me in the gospel.
1 Thessalonians 3:2 And sent Timotheus, our brother, and minister of God, and our fellowlabourer in the gospel of Christ, to establish you, and to comfort you concerning your faith:
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Chain-Reference Bible Search

Ac 19:22. Ro 16:21. 1Co 4:17; 15:58; 16:11. 2Co 6:1. Php 2:19. 1Th 3:2; 4:12.

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