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1 Corinthians 15:51 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Behold, I tell you a mystery: We all shall not sleep, but we shall all be changed,
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed,
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Behold, I tell you a mystery; we will not all sleep, but we will all be changed,
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Behold, I show you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed,
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Behold, I tell you a mystery: We shall not all fall asleep, but we shall all be changed,
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Lo! a sacred secret, unto you, do I declare:—we shall not, all, sleep, but we shall, all, be changed,—
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— lo, I tell you a secret; we indeed shall not all sleep, and we all shall be changed;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Behold, I tell you a mystery. We shall all indeed rise again: but we shall not all be changed.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Behold, I shew you a mysterie: we shall not all sleepe, but wee shall all be changed,
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— Behold, I tell you the mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we all shall be changed:
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— Lo, I tell you a mystery; we shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed,

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Behold, 2400
{2400} Prime
ἰδού
idou
{id-oo'}
Second person singular imperative middle voice of G1492; used as imperative lo!.
z5628
<5628> Grammar
Tense - Second Aorist (See G5780)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Imperative (See G5794)
Count - 459
I shew 3004
{3004} Prime
λέγω
lego
{leg'-o}
A primary verb; properly to 'lay' forth, that is, (figuratively) relate (in words [usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas G2036 and G5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while G4483 is properly to break silence merely, and G2980 means an extended or random harangue]); by implication to mean.
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
you 5213
{5213} Prime
ὑμῖν
humin
{hoo-min'}
Irregular dative case of G5210; to (with or by) you.
a mystery; 3466
{3466} Prime
μυστήριον
musterion
{moos-tay'-ree-on}
From a derivative of μύω [[muo]] (to shut the mouth); a secret or 'mystery' (through the idea of silence imposed by initiation into religious rites).
We shall y2837
[2837] Standard
κοιμάω
koimao
{koy-mah'-o}
From G2749; to put to sleep, that is, (passively or reflexively) to slumber; figuratively to decease.
z0
<0000> Grammar
The original word in the Greek or Hebrew is translated by more than one word in the English. The English translation is separated by one or more other words from the original.
not 3756
{3756} Prime
οὐ
ou
{oo}
A primary word; the absolutely negative (compare G3361) adverb; no or not.
all 3956
{3956} Prime
πᾶς
pas
{pas}
Including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole.
y3303
[3303] Standard
μέν
men
{men}
A primary particle; properly indicative of affirmation or concession (in fact); usually followed by a contrasted clause with G1161 (this one, the former, etc.
sleep, 2837
{2837} Prime
κοιμάω
koimao
{koy-mah'-o}
From G2749; to put to sleep, that is, (passively or reflexively) to slumber; figuratively to decease.
z5701
<5701> Grammar
Tense - Future (See G5776)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 251
but 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
we shall y236
[0236] Standard
ἀλλάσσω
allasso
{al-las'-so}
From G0243; to make different.
z0
<0000> Grammar
The original word in the Greek or Hebrew is translated by more than one word in the English. The English translation is separated by one or more other words from the original.
all 3956
{3956} Prime
πᾶς
pas
{pas}
Including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole.
be changed, 236
{0236} Prime
ἀλλάσσω
allasso
{al-las'-so}
From G0243; to make different.
z5691
<5691> Grammar
Tense - Second Future (See G5781)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 26
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

1 Corinthians 15:51

_ _ Behold — Calling attention to the “mystery” heretofore hidden in God’s purposes, but now revealed.

_ _ you — emphatical in the Greek; I show (Greek, “tell,” namely, by the word of the Lord, 1 Thessalonians 4:15) YOU, who think you have so much knowledge, “a mystery” (compare Romans 11:25) which your reason could never have discovered. Many of the old manuscripts and Fathers read, “We shall all sleep, but we shall not all be changed”; but this is plainly a corrupt reading, inconsistent with 1 Thessalonians 4:15, 1 Thessalonians 4:17, and with the apostle’s argument here, which is that a change is necessary (1 Corinthians 15:53). English Version is supported by some of the oldest manuscripts and Fathers. The Greek is literally “We all shall not sleep, but,” etc. The putting off of the corruptible body for an incorruptible by an instantaneous change will, in the case of “the quick,” stand as equivalent to death, appointed to all men (Hebrews 9:27); of this Enoch and Elijah are types and forerunners. The “we” implies that Christians in that age and every successive age since and hereafter were designed to stand waiting, as if Christ might come again in their time, and as if they might be found among “the quick.”

Matthew Henry's Commentary

1 Corinthians 15:51-57

_ _ To confirm what he had said of this change,

_ _ I. He here tells them what had been concealed from or unknown to them till then — that all the saints would not die, but all would be changed. Those that are alive at our Lord's coming will be caught up into the clouds, without dying, 1 Thessalonians 4:11. But it is plain from this passage that it will not be without changing from corruption to incorruption. The frame of their living bodies shall be thus altered, as well as those that are dead; and this in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, 1 Corinthians 15:52. What cannot almighty power effect? That power that calls the dead into life can surely thus soon and suddenly change the living; for changed they must be as well as the dead, because flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God. This is the mystery which the apostle shows the Corinthians: Behold, I show you a mystery; or bring into open light a truth dark and unknown before. Note, There are many mysteries shown to us in the gospel; many truths that before were utterly unknown are there made known; many truths that were but dark and obscure before are there brought into open day, and plainly revealed; and many things are in part revealed that will never be fully known, nor perhaps clearly understood. The apostle here makes known a truth unknown before, which is that the saints living at our Lord's second coming will not die, but be changed, that this change will be made in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, and at the sound of the last trump; for, as he tells us elsewhere, the Lord himself shall descend with a shout, with a voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God (1 Thessalonians 4:16), so here, the trumpet must sound. It is the loud summons of all the living and all the dead, to come and appear at the tribunal of Christ. At this summons the graves shall open, the dead saints shall rise incorruptible, and the living saints be changed to the same incorruptible state, 1 Corinthians 15:52.

_ _ II. He assigns the reason of this change (1 Corinthians 15:53): For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. How otherwise could the man be a fit inhabitant of the incorruptible regions, or be fitted to possess the eternal inheritance? How can that which is corruptible and mortal enjoy what is incorruptible, permanent, and immortal? This corruptible body must be made incorruptible, this mortal body must be changed into immortal, that the man may be capable of enjoying the happiness designed for him. Note, It is this corruptible that must put on incorruption; the demolished fabric that must be reared again. What is sown must be quickened. Saints will come in their own bodies (1 Corinthians 15:38), not in other bodies.

_ _ III. He lets us know what will follow upon this change of the living and dead in Christ: Then shall be brought to pass that saying, Death is swallowed up in victory; or, He will swallow up death in victory. Isaiah 25:8. For mortality shall be then swallowed up of life (2 Corinthians 5:4), and death perfectly subdued and conquered, and saints for ever delivered from its power. Such a conquest shall be obtained over it that it shall for ever disappear in those regions to which our Lord will bear his risen saints. And therefore will the saints hereupon sing their epinikion, their song of triumph. Then, when this mortal shall have put on immortality, will death be swallowed up, for ever swallowed up, eis nikos. Christ hinders it from swallowing his saints when they die; but, when they rise again, death shall, as to them, be swallowed for ever. And upon this destruction of death will they break out into a song of triumph.

_ _ 1. They will glory over death as a vanquished enemy, and insult this great and terrible destroyer: “O death! where is thy sting? Where is now thy sting, thy power to hurt? What mischief hast thou done us? We are dead; but behold we live again, and shall die no more. Thou art vanquished and disarmed, and we are out of the reach of thy deadly dart. Where now is thy fatal artillery? Where are thy stores of death? We fear no further mischiefs from thee, nor heed thy weapons, but defy thy power, and despise thy wrath. And, O grave! where is thy victory? Where now is thy victory? What has become of it? Where are the spoils and trophies of it? Once we were thy prisoners, but the prison-doors are burst open, the locks and bolts have been forced to give way, our shackles are knocked off, and we are for ever released. Captivity is taken captive. The imaginary victor is conquered, and forced to resign his conquest and release his captives. Thy triumphs, grave, are at an end. The bonds of death are loosed, and we are at liberty, and are never more to be hurt by death, nor imprisoned in the grave.” In a moment, the power of death, and the conquests and spoils of the grave, are gone; and, as to the saints, the very signs of them will not remain. Where are they? Thus will they raise themselves, when they become immortal, to the honour of their Saviour and the praise of divine grace: they shall glory over vanquished death.

_ _ 2. The foundation for this triumph is here intimated, (1.) In the account given whence death had its power to hurt: The sting of death is sin. This gives venom to his dart: this alone puts it into the power of death to hurt and kill. Sin unpardoned, and nothing else, can keep any under his power. And the strength of sin is the law; it is the divine threatening against the transgressors of the law, the curse there denounced, that gives power to sin. Note, Sin is the parent of death, and gives it all its hurtful power. By one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin, Romans 5:12. It is its cursed progeny and offspring. (2.) In the account given of the victory saints obtain over it through Jesus Christ, 1 Corinthians 15:56. The sting of death is sin; but Christ, by dying, has taken out this sting. He has made atonement for sin; he has obtained remission of it. It may hiss therefore, but it cannot hurt. The strength of sin is the law; but the curse of the law is removed by our Redeemer's becoming a curse for us. So that sin is deprived of its strength and sting, through Christ, that is, by his incarnation, suffering, and death. Death may seize a believer, but cannot sting him, cannot hold him in his power. There is a day coming when the grave shall open, the bands of death be loosed, the dead saints revive, and become incorruptible and immortal, and put out of the reach of death for ever. And then will it plainly appear that, as to them, death will have lost its strength and sting; and all by the mediation of Christ, by his dying in their room. By dying, he conquered death, and spoiled the grave; and, through faith in him, believers become sharers in his conquests. They often rejoice beforehand, in the hope of this victory; and, when they arise glorious from the grave, they will boldly triumph over death. Note, It is altogether owing to the grace of God in Christ that sin is pardoned and death disarmed. The law puts arms into the hand of death, to destroy the sinner; but pardon of sin takes away this power from the law, and deprives death of its strength and sting. It is by the grace of God, through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus, that we are freely justified, Romans 3:24. It is no wonder, therefore, (3.) If this triumph of the saints over death should issue in thanksgiving to God: Thanks be to God, who giveth us the victory through Christ Jesus, our Lord, 1 Corinthians 15:57. The way to sanctify all our joy is to make it tributary to the praise of God. Then only do we enjoy our blessings and honours in a holy manner when God has his revenue of glory out of it, and we are free to pay it to him. And this really improves and exalts our satisfaction. We are conscious at once of having done our duty and enjoyed our pleasure. And what can be more joyous in itself than the saints' triumph over death, when they shall rise again? And shall they not then rejoice in the Lord, and be glad in the God of their salvation? Shall not their souls magnify the Lord? When he shows such wonders to the dead, shall they not arise and praise him? Psalms 88:10. Those who remain under the power of death can have no heart to praise; but such conquests and triumphs will certainly tune the tongues of the saints to thankfulness and praise — praise for the victory (it is great and glorious in itself), and for the means whereby it is obtained (it is given of God through Christ Jesus), a victory obtained not by our power, but the power of God; not given because we are worthy, but because Christ is so, and has by dying obtained this conquest for us. Must not this circumstance endear the victory to us, and heighten our praise to God? Note, How many springs of joy to the saints and thanksgiving to God are opened by the death and resurrection, the sufferings and conquests, of our Redeemer! With what acclamations will saints rising from the dead applaud him! How will the heaven of heavens resound his praises for ever! Thanks be to God will be the burden of their song; and angels will join the chorus, and declare their consent with a loud Amen, Hallelujah.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

1 Corinthians 15:51

A mystery — A truth hitherto unknown; and not yet fully known to any of the sons of men. We — Christians. The Apostle considers them all as one, in their succeeding generations. Shall not all die — Suffer a separation of soul and body. But we shall all — Who do not die, be changed — So that this animal body shall become spiritual.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

1 Corinthians 15:51

(29) Behold, I shew you a (d) mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed,

(29) He goes further, declaring that it will come to pass that those who will be found alive in the latter day will not descend into that corruption of the grave, but will be renewed with a sudden change, which change is very necessary. And he further states that the certain enjoying of the benefit and victory of Christ, is deferred to that latter time.

(d) A thing that has been hid, and never known before now, and therefore worthy that you give good care to it.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
I show:

1 Corinthians 2:7 But we speak the wisdom of God in a mystery, [even] the hidden [wisdom], which God ordained before the world unto our glory:
1 Corinthians 4:1 Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God.
1 Corinthians 13:2 And though I have [the gift of] prophecy, and understand all mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing.
Ephesians 1:9 Having made known unto us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure which he hath purposed in himself:
Ephesians 3:3 How that by revelation he made known unto me the mystery; (as I wrote afore in few words,
Ephesians 5:32 This is a great mystery: but I speak concerning Christ and the church.

We shall not:

1 Corinthians 15:6 After that, he was seen of above five hundred brethren at once; of whom the greater part remain unto this present, but some are fallen asleep.
1 Corinthians 15:18 Then they also which are fallen asleep in Christ are perished.
1 Corinthians 15:20 But now is Christ risen from the dead, [and] become the firstfruits of them that slept.
1 Thessalonians 4:14-17 For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him. ... Then we which are alive [and] remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord.

changed:

Philippians 3:21 Who shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body, according to the working whereby he is able even to subdue all things unto himself.
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1Co 2:7; 4:1; 13:2; 15:6, 18, 20. Ep 1:9; 3:3; 5:32. Php 3:21. 1Th 4:14.

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