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1 Corinthians 15:12 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Now if Christ is preached that he hath been raised from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead?
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead?
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Now if Christ is preached, that He has been raised from the dead, how do some among you say that there is no resurrection of the dead?
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Now if Christ is preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead?
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Now if Christ is preached that he is raised from among [the] dead, how say some among you that there is not a resurrection of [those that are] dead?
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Now, if, Christ is proclaimed, that, from among the dead, he hath been raised, how say some, among you—resurrection of the dead, there is none?
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And if Christ is preached, that out of the dead he hath risen, how say certain among you, that there is no rising again of dead persons?
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Now if Christ be preached, that he arose again from the dead, how do some among you say that there is no resurrection of the dead?
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you, that there is no resurrection of the dead?
John Etheridge Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1849)
— But if the Meshiha is proclaimed that he rose from the dead, how are there among you some who say that there is no life for the dead?
James Murdock Peshitta-Aramaic NT (1852)
— And if the Messiah is proclaimed, as rising from the dead; how is it that there are some among you, who say, There is no reviviscence of the dead?

Strong's Numbers & Red-LettersGreek New TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Now 1161
{1161} Prime
δέ
de
{deh}
A primary particle (adversative or continuative); but, and, etc.
if 1487
{1487} Prime
εἰ
ei
{i}
A primary particle of conditionality; if, whether, that, etc.
Christ 5547
{5547} Prime
Χριστός
Christos
{khris-tos'}
From G5548; anointed, that is, the Messiah, an epithet of Jesus.
be preached 2784
{2784} Prime
κηρύσσω
kerusso
{kay-roos'-so}
Of uncertain affinity; to herald (as a public crier), especially divine truth (the gospel).
z5743
<5743> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 271
that 3754
{3754} Prime
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
he rose 1453
{1453} Prime
ἐγείρω
egeiro
{eg-i'-ro}
Probably akin to the base of G0058 (through the idea of collecting one's faculties); to waken (transitively or intransitively), that is, rouse (literally from sleep, from sitting or lying, from disease, from death; or figuratively from obscurity, inactivity, ruins, nonexistence).
z5769
<5769> Grammar
Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
Voice - Passive (See G5786)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 215
from 1537
{1537} Prime
ἐκ
ek
{ek}
A primary preposition denoting origin (the point whence motion or action proceeds), from, out (of place, time or cause; literally or figuratively; direct or remote).
the dead, 3498
{3498} Prime
νεκρός
nekros
{nek-ros'}
From an apparently primary word νέκυς [[nekus]] (a corpse); dead (literally or figuratively; also as noun).
how 4459
{4459} Prime
πῶς
pos
{poce}
Adverb from the base of G4226; an interrogitive particle of manner; in what way? (sometimes the question is indirect, how?); also as exclamation, how much!.
say 3004
{3004} Prime
λέγω
lego
{leg'-o}
A primary verb; properly to 'lay' forth, that is, (figuratively) relate (in words [usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas G2036 and G5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while G4483 is properly to break silence merely, and G2980 means an extended or random harangue]); by implication to mean.
z5719
<5719> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - Active (See G5784)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 3019
some 5100
{5100} Prime
τὶς
tis
{tis}
An enclitic indefinite pronoun; some or any person or object.
among 1722
{1722} Prime
ἐν
en
{en}
A primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), that is, a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); 'in', at, (up-) on, by, etc.
you 5213
{5213} Prime
ὑμῖν
humin
{hoo-min'}
Irregular dative case of G5210; to (with or by) you.
that 3754
{3754} Prime
ὅτι
hoti
{hot'-ee}
Neuter of G3748 as conjugation; demonstrative that (sometimes redundant); causatively because.
there is 2076
{2076} Prime
ἐστί
esti
{es-tee'}
Third person singular present indicative of G1510; he (she or it) is; also (with neuter plural) they are.
z5748
<5748> Grammar
Tense - Present (See G5774)
Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
Mood - Indicative (See G5791)
Count - 1612
no 3756
{3756} Prime
οὐ
ou
{oo}
A primary word; the absolutely negative (compare G3361) adverb; no or not.
resurrection 386
{0386} Prime
ἀνάστασις
anastasis
{an-as'-tas-is}
From G0450; a standing up again, that is, (literally) a resurrection from death (individual, general or by implication (its author)), or (figuratively) a (moral) recovery (of spiritual truth).
of the dead? 3498
{3498} Prime
νεκρός
nekros
{nek-ros'}
From an apparently primary word νέκυς [[nekus]] (a corpse); dead (literally or figuratively; also as noun).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

1 Corinthians 15:12

_ _ if — Seeing that it is an admitted fact that Christ is announced by us eye-witnesses as having risen from the dead, how is it that some of you deny that which is a necessary consequence of Christ’s resurrection, namely, the general resurrection?

_ _ some — Gentile reasoners (Acts 17:32; Acts 26:8) who would not believe it because they did not see “how” it could be (1 Corinthians 15:35, 1 Corinthians 15:36).

Matthew Henry's Commentary

1 Corinthians 15:12-19

_ _ Having confirmed the truth of our Saviour's resurrection, the apostle goes on to refute those among the Corinthians who said there would be none: If Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead? 1 Corinthians 15:12. It seems from this passage, and the course of the argument, there were some among the Corinthians who thought the resurrection an impossibility. This was a common sentiment among the heathens. But against this the apostle produces an incontestable fact, namely, the resurrection of Christ; and he goes on to argue against them from the absurdities that must follow from their principle. As,

_ _ I. If there be (can be) no resurrection of the dead, then Christ has not risen (1 Corinthians 15:13); and again, “If the dead rise not, cannot be raised or recovered to life, then is Christ not raised, 1 Corinthians 15:16. And yet it was foretold in ancient prophecies that he should rise; and it has been proved by multitudes of eye-witnesses that he had risen. And will you say, will any among you dare to say, that is not, cannot be, which God long ago said should be, and which is now undoubted matter of fact?”

_ _ II. It would follow hereupon that the preaching and faith of the gospel would be vain: If Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith vain, 1 Corinthians 15:14. This supposition admitted, would destroy the principal evidence of Christianity; and so, 1. Make preaching vain. “We apostles should be found false witnesses of God; we pretend to be God's witnesses for truth, and to work miracles by his power in confirmation of it, and are all the while deceivers, liars for God, if in his name, and by power received from him, we go forth, and publish and assert a thing false in fact, and impossible to be true. And does not this make us the vainest men in the world, and our office and ministry the vainest and most useless thing in the world? What end could we propose to ourselves in undertaking this hard and hazardous service, if we knew our religion stood on no better foundation, nay, if we were not well assured of the contrary? What should we preach for? Would not our labour be wholly in vain? We can have no very favourable expectations in this life; and we could have none beyond it. If Christ be not raised, the gospel is a jest; it is chaff and emptiness.” 2. This supposition would make the faith of Christians vain, as well as the labours of ministers: If Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; you are yet in your sins (1 Corinthians 15:17), yet under the guilt and condemnation of sin, because it is through his death and sacrifice for sin alone that forgiveness is to be had. We have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, Ephesians 1:7. No remission of sins is to be had but through the shedding of his blood. And had his blood been shed, and his life taken away, without ever being restored, what evidence could we have had that through him we should have justification and eternal life? Had he remained under the power of death, how could he have delivered us from its power? And how vain a thing is faith in him, upon this supposition! He must rise for our justification who was delivered for our sins, or in vain we look for any such benefit by him. There had been no justification nor salvation if Christ had not risen. And must not faith in Christ be vain, and of no signification, if he be still among the dead?

_ _ III. Another absurdity following from this supposition is that those who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. if there be no resurrection, they cannot rise, and therefore are lost, even those who have died in the Christian faith, and for it. It is plain from this that those among the Corinthians who denied the resurrection meant thereby a state of future retribution, and not merely the revival of the flesh; they took death to be the destruction and extinction of the man, and not merely of the bodily life; for otherwise the apostle could not infer the utter loss of those who slept in Jesus, from the supposition that they would never rise more or that they had no hopes in Christ after life; for they might have hope of happiness for their minds if these survived their bodies, and this would prevent the limiting of their hopes in Christ to this life only. “Upon supposition there is no resurrection in your sense, no after-state and life, then dead Christians are quite lost. How vain a thing were our faith and religion upon this supposition!” And this,

_ _ IV. Would infer that Christ's ministers and servants were of all men most miserable, as having hope in him in this life only (1 Corinthians 15:19), which is another absurdity that would follow from asserting no resurrection. Their condition who hope in Christ would be worse than that of other men. Who hope in Christ. Note, All who believe in Christ have hope in him; all who believe in him as a Redeemer hope for redemption and salvation by him; but if there be no resurrection, or state of future recompence (which was intended by those who denied the resurrection at Corinth), their hope in him must be limited to this life: and, if all their hopes in Christ lie within the compass of this life, they are in a much worse condition than the rest of mankind, especially at that time, and under those circumstances, in which the apostles wrote; for then they had no countenance nor protection from the rulers of the world, but were hated and persecuted by all men. Preachers and private Christians therefore had a hard lot if in this life only they had hope in Christ. Better be any thing than a Christian upon these terms; for in this world they are hated, and hunted, and abused, stripped of all worldly comforts and exposed to all manner of sufferings: they fare much harder than other men in this life, and yet have no further nor better hopes. And is it not absurd for one who believes in Christ to admit a principle that involves so absurd an inference? Can that man have faith in Christ who can believe concerning him that he will leave his faithful servants, whether ministers or others, in a worse state than his enemies? Note, It were a gross absurdity in a Christian to admit the supposition of no resurrection or future state. It would leave no hope beyond this world, and would frequently make his condition the worst in the world. Indeed, the Christian is by his religion crucified to this world, and taught to live upon the hope of another. Carnal pleasures are insipid to him in a great degree; and spiritual and heavenly pleasures are those which he affects and pants after. How sad is his case indeed, if he must be dead to worldly pleasures and yet never hope for any better!

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

1 Corinthians 15:12

How say some — Who probably had been heathen philosophers.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

1 Corinthians 15:12

(3) Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead?

(3) The first argument to prove that there is a resurrection from the dead: Christ is risen again, therefore the dead will rise again.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
if:

1 Corinthians 15:4 And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:

how:

1 Corinthians 15:13-19 But if there be no resurrection of the dead, then is Christ not risen: ... If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable.
Acts 26:8 Why should it be thought a thing incredible with you, that God should raise the dead?
2 Thessalonians 2:17 Comfort your hearts, and stablish you in every good word and work.
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Ac 26:8. 1Co 15:4, 13. 2Th 2:17.

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